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dc.contributor.authorPoon, Joanna
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-08T11:17:17Z
dc.date.available2016-12-08T11:17:17Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationPoon, J 2014, 'Do real estate courses sufficiently develop their graduates’ employability skills? Perspectives from multiple stakeholders' , Education and Training, 56 (6) , pp. 562-581.en
dc.identifier.issn1463-578X
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JPIF-12-2013-0068
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621129
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accredited real estate courses in the UK have equipped real estate graduates with sufficient relevant employability skills to embark on a career in the profession. This paper considers the perspectives of four stakeholders – employers, human resource managers, graduates and course directors of RICS-accredited real estate courses – in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: The results of a mixed-methods study, involving two online surveys with real estate employers and recent graduates of RICS-accredited real estate courses, and two sets of interviews with human resource managers of real estate surveying firms and course directors of RICS-accredited real estate courses, are presented. Findings: The employers and graduates of the RICS-accredited real estate courses do not think the courses sufficiently equip graduates’ with employability skills. On the other hand, the human resource managers are very impressed with graduates’ technical skills but have concerns about their soft skills and attributes. Human resource managers and course directors of RICS real estate courses commented that commercial awareness is an important employability skill but graduates are not well developed in this area. Course directors also noted that practical experience is vital to employability, commenting that students can only obtain real-life practical experience if employers offer them opportunities. Originality/value: This paper makes an original contribution to the existing literature on employability skills for real estate graduates. It describes pioneering research considering the perspectives of four types of stakeholders and evaluates whether real estate courses sufficiently develop graduates’ employability skills.
dc.description.sponsorshipNon funded researchen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://usir.salford.ac.uk/34823/en
dc.titleDo real estate courses sufficiently develop their graduates’ employability skills? Perspectives from multiple stakeholdersen
dc.typearticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Salforden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Property Investment and Financeen
dc.identifier.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JPIF-12-2013-0068
html.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accredited real estate courses in the UK have equipped real estate graduates with sufficient relevant employability skills to embark on a career in the profession. This paper considers the perspectives of four stakeholders – employers, human resource managers, graduates and course directors of RICS-accredited real estate courses – in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: The results of a mixed-methods study, involving two online surveys with real estate employers and recent graduates of RICS-accredited real estate courses, and two sets of interviews with human resource managers of real estate surveying firms and course directors of RICS-accredited real estate courses, are presented. Findings: The employers and graduates of the RICS-accredited real estate courses do not think the courses sufficiently equip graduates’ with employability skills. On the other hand, the human resource managers are very impressed with graduates’ technical skills but have concerns about their soft skills and attributes. Human resource managers and course directors of RICS real estate courses commented that commercial awareness is an important employability skill but graduates are not well developed in this area. Course directors also noted that practical experience is vital to employability, commenting that students can only obtain real-life practical experience if employers offer them opportunities. Originality/value: This paper makes an original contribution to the existing literature on employability skills for real estate graduates. It describes pioneering research considering the perspectives of four types of stakeholders and evaluates whether real estate courses sufficiently develop graduates’ employability skills.


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