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dc.contributor.authorBetts, Lucy R.
dc.contributor.authorGkimitzoudis, Athanasios
dc.contributor.authorSpenser, Karin A.
dc.contributor.authorBaguley, Thom
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-23T15:04:55Z
dc.date.available2016-11-23T15:04:55Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-14
dc.identifier.citationBetts, et al (2016) 'Examining the roles young people fulfill in five types of cyber bullying', Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 34(7), pp. 1080-1098.en
dc.identifier.issn02654075
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0265407516668585
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621046en
dc.description.abstractThe roles that young people fulfill in face-to-face bullying have been well documented and there is some evidence that young people take on similar roles in cyber bullying. A person-centered analytical approach was adopted to identify the roles that young people fulfill across five different types of cyber bullying assessed for up to nine media. Four hundred and forty (281 females and 154 males) 16- to 19-year-olds completed measures to assess their involvement in various types of cyber bullying and across the various media. Cluster analysis identified four distinct groups: “not involved,” “rarely victim and bully,” “typically victim,” and “retaliator.” Two thirds of the sample reported some involvement in cyber bullying. Distinct patterns emerged for each group according to the type of cyber bullying. The lack of a clear bully group and the presence of the retaliator group strengthen the growing evidence base that young people may cyber bully others as a mechanism of retaliation when they are the victim of cyber bullying.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://spr.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0265407516668585en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Social and Personal Relationshipsen
dc.subjectCyberbulyingen
dc.subjectBullyingen
dc.subjectMediaen
dc.subjectRetaliatiionen
dc.subjectVictimsen
dc.titleExamining the roles young people fulfill in five types of cyber bullyingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1460-3608
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Social and Personal Relationshipsen
html.description.abstractThe roles that young people fulfill in face-to-face bullying have been well documented and there is some evidence that young people take on similar roles in cyber bullying. A person-centered analytical approach was adopted to identify the roles that young people fulfill across five different types of cyber bullying assessed for up to nine media. Four hundred and forty (281 females and 154 males) 16- to 19-year-olds completed measures to assess their involvement in various types of cyber bullying and across the various media. Cluster analysis identified four distinct groups: “not involved,” “rarely victim and bully,” “typically victim,” and “retaliator.” Two thirds of the sample reported some involvement in cyber bullying. Distinct patterns emerged for each group according to the type of cyber bullying. The lack of a clear bully group and the presence of the retaliator group strengthen the growing evidence base that young people may cyber bully others as a mechanism of retaliation when they are the victim of cyber bullying.


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