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dc.contributor.authorFoster, Carley
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-09T12:52:22Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-22T16:38:01Z
dc.date.available2016-11-22T16:38:01Z
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationFOSTER, C., 2011. Using scenarios to explore employee attitudes in retailing. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 39 (3), pp. 218-228.en
dc.identifier.issn1758-6690en
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09590551111115042en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620733
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620975
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of the paper is to explore how hypothetical scenarios can be used to study individual employee attitudes towards diversity and equality initiatives in retailing. Design/methodology/approach: Forty semi-structured interviews were conducted with a range of staff working in three business units belonging to a UK retailer. As part of the interviews, respondents were asked to comment on four work based scenarios exploring customer and employee diversity issues. Findings: The paper proposes that scenarios can be a useful method for exploring the hidden meanings retail employees have towards ethical issues such as diversity management. However, they may not always be useful for furthering knowledge of the area. This is because responses to the scenarios in this study frequently contradicted the respondent’s real-life work experiences explored in the rest of the interview. This suggests that, when commenting on the scenarios, interviewees did not always ground their responses so that they reflected their role in the retailer and their own diversity. Originality/Value: The study argues that hypothetical scenarios, if used in retail research or for retail training and development purposes, should have ecological validity. In order to obtain an accurate picture of individual attitudes and to tease out what an individual might do (the rhetoric) from what they have actually experienced (the reality), those researching in the retail industry should use a range of qualitative methods to study the same issue.
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://irep.ntu.ac.uk/6028/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09590551111115042en
dc.titleUsing scenarios to explore employee attitudes in retailingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Retail & Distribution Managementen
dc.publisher.placeBingleyen
dc.identifier.volume39en
dc.identifier.issue3en
dc.identifier.pages218-228en
html.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of the paper is to explore how hypothetical scenarios can be used to study individual employee attitudes towards diversity and equality initiatives in retailing. Design/methodology/approach: Forty semi-structured interviews were conducted with a range of staff working in three business units belonging to a UK retailer. As part of the interviews, respondents were asked to comment on four work based scenarios exploring customer and employee diversity issues. Findings: The paper proposes that scenarios can be a useful method for exploring the hidden meanings retail employees have towards ethical issues such as diversity management. However, they may not always be useful for furthering knowledge of the area. This is because responses to the scenarios in this study frequently contradicted the respondent’s real-life work experiences explored in the rest of the interview. This suggests that, when commenting on the scenarios, interviewees did not always ground their responses so that they reflected their role in the retailer and their own diversity. Originality/Value: The study argues that hypothetical scenarios, if used in retail research or for retail training and development purposes, should have ecological validity. In order to obtain an accurate picture of individual attitudes and to tease out what an individual might do (the rhetoric) from what they have actually experienced (the reality), those researching in the retail industry should use a range of qualitative methods to study the same issue.


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