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dc.contributor.authorAbdelhadi, A.
dc.contributor.authorWhysall, P.
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Carley
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-09T12:52:21Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-22T16:38:01Z
dc.date.available2016-11-22T16:38:01Z
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationABDELHADI, A., WHYSALL, P and FOSTER, C., 2011. Does software piracy always represent consumer misbehaviour? In: 16th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution, University of Palma, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, June 2011.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620730
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620972
dc.description.abstractThis study aims to explore whether or not software piracy is perceived as consumer misbehaviour in Libya. Both qualitative and quantitative methods have been used; data were collected by interviewing 10 marketers and through a questionnaire surveying 219 Libyan consumers. The study found that almost all of the software in the Libyan market is copied in ways that would be considered illegal in Western societies but the marketers interviewed did not consider this as misbehaviour. Instead, some of them were actively encouraging consumers to adopt this pattern of behaviour. Also, nearly half (49.4%) of the sample had positive attitudes toward software piracy and 43% had an intention to conduct this behaviour. Furthermore, only 34% of consumers thought that software piracy is illegal, despite laws existing that protect intellectual property rights.
dc.relation.urlhttp://irep.ntu.ac.uk/1447/en
dc.titleDoes software piracy always represent consumer misbehaviour?en
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen
dc.conference.dateJun-11en
dc.conference.name16th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distributionen
dc.conference.locationUniversity of Palma, Palma de Mallorca, Spain,en
html.description.abstractThis study aims to explore whether or not software piracy is perceived as consumer misbehaviour in Libya. Both qualitative and quantitative methods have been used; data were collected by interviewing 10 marketers and through a questionnaire surveying 219 Libyan consumers. The study found that almost all of the software in the Libyan market is copied in ways that would be considered illegal in Western societies but the marketers interviewed did not consider this as misbehaviour. Instead, some of them were actively encouraging consumers to adopt this pattern of behaviour. Also, nearly half (49.4%) of the sample had positive attitudes toward software piracy and 43% had an intention to conduct this behaviour. Furthermore, only 34% of consumers thought that software piracy is illegal, despite laws existing that protect intellectual property rights.


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