• Value co-creation in temporary, independent retailing: a study of customer value perceptions of pop-up stores

      Foster, Carley; Brindley, Clare; Ghosh, Biswaraj; Armannsdottir, Guja; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (2017-07-05)
    • Variations in retail employment characteristics and travel-to-work and their implications for retail-led regeneration

      Whysall, P.; Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (2008)
    • What opportunity cost of holding real balances? The case of Greece 1978–1993.

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Macedonia (Taylor & Francis, 2006-11-02)
      In this paper cointegration techniques have been applied to identify the role of opportunity cost in the demand for real balances in the Greek case and covering the period 1978–93. The results reveal that it is the simultaneous presence of nominal interest rates, the expected inflation and the expected depreciation variables that must be used as proxies for the opportunity cost.
    • What's it like to work in retailing?

      Foster, Carley; Whysall, P.; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (2006)
    • Women in marketing: a European exploration

      Foster, Carley; Brindley, Clare; Wheatley, Dan; Nottingham Trent University (2011)
    • Women in retail face barriers to progression for working part-time

      Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Whysall, P.; Nottingham Trent University (Chartered Institute of Personnel and DevelopmentLondon, 2006)
    • Women in the marketing profession: an exploration

      Foster, Carley; Wheatley, Dan; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (Wiley, 2014-06-25)
      Hunt (2002:305) expounded that a key "recurring theme" in marketing is the gap between the academic discipline and those practising it. When this debate is extrapolated to the issue of marketing careers, then a further side of the prism is exposed, namely what is the gap between what the academic discipline promises in terms of careers and the reality that practice offers. Indeed the debate about whether marketing is a profession (Brown et al, 2005; Enright, 2006) further complicates the topic. A useful starting point is Hagberg and Kjellberg (2010:1036) work which calls for "a broader understanding of marketing practice." It is to this "heterogeneity of marketing practitioners" (Hagberg and Kjellberg,2010:1036) that we subscribe to when undertaking our research. Marketing is considered to be a feminised industry yet there is little knowledge about the careers these women have in the profession. Typically research in the field has focused on the planning and implementation of marketing rather than the experiences of those doing the marketing. Drawing on an analysis of the UK Labour Force Survey this paper argues that women working in marketing are younger and more highly qualified than in other sectors but are less likely to be in senior decision-making roles. A proportion of older women in the industry are also self-employed suggesting that marketing talent may be being lost to corporate marketing but not necessarily to the industry. The paper presents a picture of the employment of women in marketing in the UK and discusses reasons for this and also attempts to contextualise these findings in the profession from a European perspective. Suggestions for future research directions are also given.
    • Women's careers in marketing: self-employment in Europe

      Wheatley, Dan; Foster, Carley; Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (2011)
      Marketing is considered to be a feminised industry yet there is little knowledge about the careers women have in this sector, especially the self-employed. This paper focuses on women in the marketing sector in six countries from the 2009 EU LFS sample, where countries were selected for analysis on the basis of the Economic Intelligence Unit’s Overall Women’s Economic Opportunity rankings. The analysis builds upon prior work conducted using the UK LFS, to present a picture of the employment of women in marketing within the EU. The EU6 selected are: Belgium, Finland, Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the UK. Our analysis suggests that women working in marketing are younger and more highly qualified than in other sectors but are less likely to be in senior decision-making roles. A number of older and often highly educated women in the industry, many of which report being married and having dependent children, are self-employed suggesting that marketing talent may be being lost to corporate marketing but not necessarily to the industry. In addition, many of these women report secondary employment, suggesting that this talent may retain close connections with corporate marketing. Overall patterns among self-employed women in marketing are comparable across the EU6 suggesting women face similar working patterns across Europe, but with some important and statistically significant variations. The overall picture is one of women in marketing pursuing self-employment when they reach a particular life and/or career stage for the added flexibility this offers, often driven by caring responsibilities.
    • Working in East Midlands retailing - a preliminary analysis of the opinions of employees

      Foster, Carley; Whysall, P.; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (2005)