• Gendered perceptions of sales staff in DIY retailing

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (2004)
    • Gendered retailing: a study of customer perceptions of front line staff in the DIY sector

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald, 2004)
      This paper reports findings from a small scale study exploring the role gender plays in the interactions between customers and front-line staff in DIY retailing. Drawing on materials gathered through observations, informal discussions with staff and focus groups, this study suggests that “maleness” pervades many aspects of DIY retailing. For the respondents the image of the case retailer, B&Q, and the products sold had male connotations. Furthermore, male customers perceived male customer-facing staff to have better knowledge of technical DIY than female employees, even though this was not always the case. Given the rising interest from women in home improvements, it would appear that measures need to be put in place to create a more “inclusive” DIY store environment for female customers, and one that challenges the stereotypical assumptions held by many male home improvement customers.
    • Gendered retailing: a study of customer perceptions of front line staff in the DIY sector

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald, 2004)
      This paper reports findings from a small scale study exploring the role gender plays in the interactions between customers and front-line staff in DIY retailing. Drawing on materials gathered through observations, informal discussions with staff and focus groups, this study suggests that “maleness” pervades many aspects of DIY retailing. For the respondents the image of the case retailer, B&Q, and the products sold had male connotations. Furthermore, male customers perceived male customer-facing staff to have better knowledge of technical DIY than female employees, even though this was not always the case. Given the rising interest from women in home improvements, it would appear that measures need to be put in place to create a more “inclusive” DIY store environment for female customers, and one that challenges the stereotypical assumptions held by many male home improvement customers.
    • Global HR IT development teams as liminal teams

      Tansley, Carole; Williams, Hazel; Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (2008)
    • Globalisation, economic growth and energy consumption in the BRICS region: the importance of asymmetries.

      Shahbaz, Muhammad; Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain; Alam, Shaista; Apergis, Nicholas; Montpelier Business School; COMSATS Institute of InformationTechnology; University of Karachi; University of Piraeus (Taylor & Francis, 2018-06-19)
      This paper examines the asymmetric impact of globalisation and economic growth on energy consumption in BRICS countries, applying the NARDL bounds approach to explore the presence of asymmetric cointegration across variables. The empirical results reveals that energy consumption is positively and negatively affected by the positive and negative globalisation shocks, respectively. A positive shock in economic growth promotes energy consumption, while a negative shock reduces energy consumption.
    • Good volatility, bad volatility: what drives the asymmetric connectedness of Australian electricity markets?

      Apergis, Nicholas; Baruník, Jozef; Lau, Chi Keung Marco; University of Piraeus; Charles University; Northumbria University (Elsevier, 2017-06-22)
      Efficient delivery of network services and the electricity infrastructure to meet the long-term consumer's interests are the main objectives and the strategies of a national electricity market, while the main interests of generators are to maximize their profit through pricing strategies. Therefore, the objective of this study is to explore whether electricity prices across the four Australian States display symmetric price volatility connectedness. The study is the first attempt in the literature to make use of intraday 5-min Australian dispatch electricity prices, spanning the period December 8th, 1998 to May 5th, 2016 to quantify asymmetries in volatility connectedness emerging from good, and bad volatility. The results provide supportive evidence that the Australian electricity markets are connected asymmetrically implying the presence of some degree of market power that is exercised by generators across regional electricity markets.
    • Green human resource management and environmental cooperation: An ability-motivation-opportunity and contingency perspective

      Yu, Wantao; Chavez, Roberto; Feng, Mengying; Wong, Chee Yew; Fynes, Brian; University of Roehampton; winburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, 3122, Australia; Chongqing Jiaotong University Xufu Dadao, Nanan District, Chongqing, China; University of Leeds; University College Dublin (Elsevier, 2019-06-18)
      This study examines the value of green human resource management (GHRM) in supporting environmental cooperation with customers and suppliers, and the moderating roles of internal green supply chain management (GSCM). A survey of 126 automobile manufacturers in China is analysed using moderated regression analysis, based on a proposed conceptual model grounded in ability–motivation–opportunity (AMO) theory and contingency theory (CT). The results reveal that GHRM is significantly and positively related to environmental cooperation with customers and suppliers, and that the relationships are significantly moderated by internal GSCM. HRM practitioners are advised to develop GHRM practices that provide training (ability), incentive (motivation), and conductive environment (opportunity) to help implement environmental collaboration, while SCM practitioners may improve internal GSCM to strengthen the effects of GHRM. This study clarifies key GHRM practices that contribute to GSCM, and advances related research by developing and testing an overarching model to explain such synergies and the moderating role of internal GSCM.
    • Greenhouse gas emissions convergence in Spain: Evidence from the club clustering approach

      Apergis, Nicholas; Garzón, Antonio; University of Derby; University of Seville (Springer, 2020-07-05)
      This study examines the convergence of greenhouse gas emissions per capita across the 19 Spanish regions using the Phillips-Sul club convergence approach over the period spanning from 1990 to 2017. The results indicate the existence of 3 clubs which converge to different equilibria and correspond to the same convergence clubs in terms of income per capita. These findings suggest that mitigation policies should take into account the existence of different clubs of regions with different convergence paths in terms of emissions.
    • Health behaviour convergence: evidence from fractional (long memory) convergence and British microdata.

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Wiley, 2017-03-05)
      This paper uses a fractional methodology to assess convergence in terms of differences in health quality measures, based on six primary criteria, across the English regions. Hence, it uses the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing database and the retrospective interviews from 16,894 participants, aged 50+, with data from three waves–2004/5, 2006/7 and 2008/9, to establish that health quality is characterized by divergences across six health quality criteria. When the overall sample is differentiated through income, education and employment, the evidence favors convergence, indicating that certain socioeconomic factors impose a uniform behavioral attitude of the population toward health quality criteria.
    • Health care expenditure and environmental pollution: a cross-country comparison across different income groups

      Apergis, Nicholas; Bhattacharya, Mita; Hadhri, Walid; University of Derby; Monash University; UAQUAP, Higher Institute of Management (Springer, 2020-01-03)
      This paper investigates the long-run dynamics between health care expenditure and environmental pollution across four global income groups. The analysis uses data from 178 countries, spanning the period 1995–2017. Panel estimations are employed with unobserved heterogeneity, temporal persistence, and cross-sectional dependence using a model with common correlated effects. The findings document that the health care expenditure is a necessity for all sub-groups. We established that a 1% increase in national income increased health expenditure by 7.2% in the full sample, and 9.3%, 8.6%, 6.8% and 2.9% for low, low-middle, upper-middle and high-income groups, respectively, while a 1% increase in CO2 emissions increased health expenditure by 2.5% in the full sample, and 2.9%, 1.2%, 2.3% and 2.6% across these four income groups. We recommend that coordinated approach is needed in setting policy goals both in energy and health sectors in mitigating the negative effects of pollution. Our findings indicate that low-carbon emissions and energy efficient health care services will significantly reduce future health care expenses.
    • Health expenses and economic growth: convergence dynamics across the Indian States

      Apergis, Nicholas; Padhi, Puja; University of Piraeus; IIT Bombay (Springer, 2013-11)
      In this paper we explore convergence of real per capita output and health expenses across the Indian States. The new panel convergence methodology, developed by Phillips and Sul (Econometrica 75:1771–1855, 2007), is employed. The empirical findings suggest that these States form distinct convergent clubs, exhibiting considerable heterogeneity in the underlying growth and health expenses factors. These findings should help policy makers in designing appropriate growth-oriented and/or health sector programs and setting priorities in their implementation.
    • How deviations from FOMC’s monetary policy decisions from a benchmark monetary policy rule affect bank profitability: evidence from U.S. banks

      Apergis, Nicholas; Lau, Chi Keung Marco; University of Piraeus; Northumbria University (Emerald, 2017-05-22)
      This paper aims to provide fresh empirical evidence on how Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) monetary policy decisions from a benchmark monetary policy rule affect the profitability of US banking institutions. It thereby provides a link between the literature on central bank monetary policy implementation through monetary rules and banks’ profitability. It uses a novel data set from 11,894 US banks, spanning the period 1990 to 2013. The empirical findings show that deviations of FOMC monetary policy decisions from a number of benchmark linear and non-linear monetary (Taylor type) rules exert a negative and statistically significant impact on banks’ profitability.
    • HRIS project teams skills and knowledge: a human capital analysis

      Williams, Hazel; Tansley, Carole; Foster, Carley; Bondarouk, T; Nottingham Trent University (IGI GlobalHershey, PA, 2009)
    • Identity ambiguity and the promises and practices of hybrid e-HRM project teams

      Tansley, Carole; Huang, J.; Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Elsevier, 2013)
      The role of IS project team identity work in the enactment of day-to-day relationships with their internal clients is under-researched. We address this gap by examining the identity work undertaken by an electronic human resource management (e-HRM) 'hybrid' project team engaged in an enterprise-wide IS implementation for their multi-national organisation. Utilising social identity theory, we identify three distinctive, interrelated dimensions of project team identity work (project team management, team 'value propositions' (promises) and the team's 'knowledge practice'). We reveal how dissonance between two perspectives of e-HRM project identity work (clients' expected norms of project team's service and project team's expected norms of themselves) results in identity ambiguity. Our research contributions are to identity studies in the IS project management, HR and hybrid literatures and to managerial practice by challenging the assumption that hybrid experts are the panacea for problems associated with IS projects.
    • The impact of fracking activities on Oklahoma’s housing prices: a panel cointegration analysis.

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Elsevier., 2019-01-08)
      Fracking drilling has opened a discussion on the role of technological developments in economies engaged in shale oil and gas formations. Oil and natural gas production opened new possibilities for employment benefits and housing prices decreases. This paper explores, for the first time, the impact of fracking on housing prices across Oklahoma’s counties, spanning the period 2000-2015. Through panel methods, the findings show a positive effect on housing prices, while this positive effect gains statistical significance only over the period after the 2006 fracking boom. The results survive a robustness check that explicitly considers distance and groundwater-dependency issues.
    • The impact of greenhouse gas emissions on personal well-being: evidence from a panel of 58 countries and aggregate and regional country samples.

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Springer, 2016-10-14)
      This study investigates the link between personal well-being and per capita greenhouse gas emissions by considering a panel data methodological approach. The empirical findings illustrate that there is a significant effect of those emissions on personal well-being through the aggregate country sample. A robust finding is that similar results hold across regional samples, with the strongest effect being displayed in the case of the European regional component. The empirical findings are expected to carry important implications for consumers, corporations, and economic policy makers who all must take explicitly into consideration the impact of their economic decisions on the sustainability of economic growth plans.
    • Implementing diversity management in retailing: exploring the role of organisational context

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), 2005)
      Diversity management is a means of managing customer and employee differences for the benefit of the organisation. This qualitative study considers how contextual factors influence diversity management implementation in different retailing environments. Exploratory research was conducted in three SBUs of a UK retailing group: the UK high street SBU, the US operations and the online SBU. Despite different cultural, legal and historical differences between the UK and US, these factors did not lead to significantly different ways of dealing with diversity in the UK high street and US businesses. Instead the extent to which individual differences were recognised was influenced by the selling environment and the retailer’s size and structure. The paper recommends that retailer’s need to develop a ‘home-grown’ approach to diversity management that acknowledges their organisational context.
    • Implementing diversity management in retailing: exploring the role of organisational context

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), 2005)
      Diversity management is a means of managing customer and employee differences for the benefit of the organisation. This qualitative study considers how contextual factors influence diversity management implementation in different retailing environments. Exploratory research was conducted in three SBUs of a UK retailing group: the UK high street SBU, the US operations and the online SBU. Despite different cultural, legal and historical differences between the UK and US, these factors did not lead to significantly different ways of dealing with diversity in the UK high street and US businesses. Instead the extent to which individual differences were recognised was influenced by the selling environment and the retailer’s size and structure. The paper recommends that retailer’s need to develop a ‘home-grown’ approach to diversity management that acknowledges their organisational context.
    • Improving the position of women in the labour market - a study of retailing

      Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Whysall, P.; Nottingham Trent University (European Social Fund, 2006)
    • Inflation and Uncertainty: Does the EMS P a rticipation Play Any Role?

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Macedonia (Sejong University, 1998-12)
      This paper examines whether European Monetary System (EMS) member - ship has affected the link between inflation and inflation uncertainty. ARCH measures of conditional inflation volatility and Granger-causality tests for nine OECD countries over the period 1980-1994 indicate that in non-EMS coun - tries -in these countries a monetary target seems to have been closely followedinflation seems to determine the behaviour of inflation uncert a i n t y. By con - trast, in EMS countries – these countries have geared their monetary policies to an exchange rate target – inflation seems to have no impact on inflation uncertainty. This finding is probably due first, to the absence of any institution - al restriction that characterises non-EMS membership, on the manner the monetary policy is pursued, and second, to the fact that under a monetary rule, any institutional or regulatory changes in the monetary sector are expected to fall more adversely upon inflation as well as inflation uncertainty.