• On the dynamics of poverty and income inequality in US states

      Apergis, Nicholas; Dincer, Oguzhan; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University; Illinois State University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011)
      This study seeks to provide answers to the following questions: Is there a relationship between poverty and income inequality in the short run/long run? Is the relationship unidirectional from income inequality to poverty as the previous studies assume, or is it bidirectional? The paper investigates the causality between income inequality and poverty within a multivariate framework using a panel data set of 50 US states over the period 1980 to 2004. The results reveal that a bidirectional relationship exists between poverty and income inequality both in the short run and in the long run. With respect to the short‐run dynamics associated with poverty, both income inequality and the unemployment rate have a positive and statistically significant impact on poverty, a negative and statistically significant impact for real per capita personal income and level of education, while corruption is insignificant. In terms of the short‐run dynamics associated with income inequality, poverty, the unemployment rate, real per capita personal income, and the level of education have a positive and statistically significant impact, while corruption has a statistically insignificant impact on income inequality. With regard to the long‐run dynamics, the statistically significant error correction terms indicate the presence of a feedback relationship between poverty and income inequality.
    • US political corruption: identifying the channels of bribes for firms' financial policies.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Apergis, Emmanuel; University of Kent; University of Piraeus (Elsevier, 2017-09-28)
      This paper presents first-time evidence on ‘channel-based’ firm corruption in the US, spanning the period 2000–2010. By employing conviction, type of bribery, ethnicity firm-level data, and two alternative panel econometric approaches for robustness, the empirical analysis documents first, that the cash payment channel dominates bribery activities in relevance to the firms' financial policies, while ethnicity groups do matter in exemplifying the role of those channels, with the Anglo-Saxon group dominating such activities. The results could be of substantial importance for regulators in developing venues to capture corruption activities.