• Professional doctorate curriculum design: A resource dependency analysis of DBA stakeholders

      Foster, Carley; Kirk, Susan; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (British Academy of Management, 2016-09-07)
      Interest in Professional Doctorates (ProfDs), including the Doctorate in Business Administration (DBA) programme, has increased significantly over recent years (Mellors-Bourne et al., 2016). Wildly et al (2015:p762) suggest that this is because globally, there is interest in research degrees which are ‘…more relevant, field-based doctoral studies incorporating applied rather than pure research…’. In comparison to a PhD, a Professional Doctorate adopts a more structured approach to learning and typically attracts industry professionals who wish to investigate a work-based problem through doctoral level research (Costley and Lester, 2012; Chiteng Kot and Hendel, 2011). Furthermore, according to Lester (2004:p767) ProfDs aim to be ‘…academically robust and directly relevant to professional practitioners who are concerned with leading practice and initiating change rather than being researchers.’ The DBA in particular has proven to be a popular Professional Doctorate, representing a natural progression from the MBA.
    • The role of value co-creation in SME pop-up retail space: a supply-side relational stakeholder perspective.

      Foster, Carley; Brindley, Clare; Oxborrow, Lynn; Armannsdottir, Guja; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (2017-07-05)
      Pop-ups are regarded as temporary retail space providing an experiential experience to customers, a solution to filling empty retail units and a way for SME retailers to market test products and services. Studies exploring the pop-up phenomenon have focused upon the vale co-creation between the customer and pop-up owner. However, this paper argues that the inter-organisational relationships the pop-up has with other supply-side stakeholders can also be a source of value co-creation for the pop-up. The paper argues that inter-organisational interactions are a source of value creation helping to improve the managerial capabilities and business model of the pop-up. This in turn improves the final offering to the end consumer. The study draws upon interview data collected from landlords, local authorities, shopping centres, community representatives and pop-owners across 6 sites in the UK, Iceland and the Netherlands.