• Causality between energy consumption and GDP in the U.S.: evidence from wavelet analysis.

      Aslan, Alper; Apergis, Nicholas; Yildirim, Selim; Nevsehir University; University of Piraeus; Anadolu University (Springer, 2013-12-02)
      This study investigates the dynamic causal relationship between energy consumption and economic growth in the U.S. at different time scales. The main novelty of the study is that this paper complements the existing studies on the nexus between energy consumption and economic growth by employing the wavelet transformation to obtain different time scales in order to investigate causality between energy consumption and economic growth. This method is first developed by Ramsey and Lampart. Their approach consists of first decomposing the series into time scales by wavelet filters and testing causality of each time scale with the pertinent time scale of the other series separately. The data span from 1973q1 to 2012q1 on a quarterly basis. The main empirical insight is that the causal relationship is stronger at finer time scales, whereas the relationship is less and less apparent at longer time horizons. The results indicate that energy consumption causes economic growth, while the reverse is not true at the original frequency of the data. At the very finest scale the same result arises. However, at coarser scales feedback is observed. In particular, at intermediate time scales the evidence indicates that energy consumption causes economic growth, while the reverse is also true. These empirical findings are expected to be of high importance in terms of the effective design and implementation of energy and environmental policies, especially when a number of countries in the pursuit of high economic growth targets do not pay any serious attention on environmental issues.
    • CO2 emissions, energy usage, and output in Central America

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University (Elsevier, 2009-08)
      This study extends the recent work of Ang (2007) [Ang, J.B., 2007. CO2 emissions, energy consumption, and output in France. Energy Policy 35, 4772–4778] in examining the causal relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, energy consumption, and output within a panel vector error correction model for six Central American countries over the period 1971–2004. In long-run equilibrium energy consumption has a positive and statistically significant impact on emissions while real output exhibits the inverted U-shape pattern associated with the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis. The short-run dynamics indicate unidirectional causality from energy consumption and real output, respectively, to emissions along with bidirectional causality between energy consumption and real output. In the long-run there appears to be bidirectional causality between energy consumption and emissions.
    • Coal consumption and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of OECD countries

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University (Elsevier, 2010-03)
      This study examines the relationship between coal consumption and economic growth for 25 OECD countries within a multivariate panel framework over period 1980–2005. The Larsson et al. (2001) panel cointegration test indicates there is a long-run equilibrium relationship between real GDP, coal consumption, real gross fixed capital formation, and the labor force. The respective coefficients for real gross fixed capital formation and the labor force are positive and statistically significant whereas the coefficient for coal consumption is negative and statistically significant. The results of the panel vector error correction model reveal bidirectional causality between coal consumption and economic growth in both the short- and long-run; however, the bidirectional causality in the short-run is negative.
    • The oil curse, institutional quality, and growth in MENA countries: Evidence from time-varying cointegration

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Georgia College & State University (Elsevier, 2014-09-16)
      This study re-examines the impact of oil abundance on economic growth in a number of MENA (Middle East and North African) countries for the period 1990–2013. Given the number of economic and institutional reforms undertaken by these countries in recent years, we incorporate measures of institutional quality to evaluate if oil abundance impacts economic growth differently. The results from time-varying cointegration reveal that better institutional quality reduces the unfavorable effect of oil reserves on the performance of the real economy.
    • On the causal dynamics between emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and economic growth

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; Menyah, Kojo; Wolde-Rufael, Yemane; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University; London Metropolitan University; Private (Elsevier, 2010-09-15)
      This paper examines the causal relationship between CO2 emissions, nuclear energy consumption, renewable energy consumption, and economic growth for a group of 19 developed and developing countries for the period 1984–2007 using a panel error correction model. The long-run estimates indicate that there is a statistically significant negative association between nuclear energy consumption and emissions, but a statistically significant positive relationship between emissions and renewable energy consumption. The results from the panel Granger causality tests suggest that in the short-run nuclear energy consumption plays an important role in reducing CO2 emissions whereas renewable energy consumption does not contribute to reductions in emissions. This may be due to the lack of adequate storage technology to overcome intermittent supply problems as a result electricity producers have to rely on emission generating energy sources to meet peak load demand.
    • Renewable energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of OECD countries

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University (Elsevier, 2010-01)
      This study examines the relationship between renewable energy consumption and economic growth for a panel of twenty OECD countries over the period 1985–2005 within a multivariate framework. Given the relatively short span of the time series data, a panel cointegration and error correction model is employed to infer the causal relationship. The heterogeneous panel cointegration test reveals a long-run equilibrium relationship between real GDP, renewable energy consumption, real gross fixed capital formation, and the labor force with the respective coefficients positive and statistically significant. The Granger-causality results indicate bidirectional causality between renewable energy consumption and economic growth in both the short- and long-run.