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dc.contributor.authorLarcombe, Peter J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-16T13:55:07Z
dc.date.available2016-11-16T13:55:07Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.citationLarcombe, P. J. (2016) 'A short monograph on exposition and the emotive nature of research and publishing', Mathematics Today, 52 (2), pp. 86-91en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620864
dc.description.abstractNot altogether surprisingly – given that mathematicians are humans first and foremost, with as much variety in personality, inspiration, energy and temperament as found in any other societal grouping – within our own internal ranks there will always be a degree of discord and divisions of opinion on such things as the relative merits of ‘pure’ versus ‘applied’ mathematics, research versus instruction, rigorous versus heuristic arguments, theoretical versus practical work, conceptual versus computational analysis, problem-solvers versus theory-builders, anonymous versus declared refereeing, solo versus collaborative efforts, and so on. Overlaying most of these, the very essence of research and publishing raises separate sources of emotive contention, as does the virtue of writing expositively which is discussed here based partly as a result of some recent survey work by the author that also forms a starting point for the piece.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ima.org.uk/activities/publications/mathematics_today.cfm.htmlen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectOpinion pieceen
dc.subjectAcademic publishingen
dc.titleA short monograph on exposition and the emotive nature of research and publishingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalMathematics Todayen
html.description.abstractNot altogether surprisingly – given that mathematicians are humans first and foremost, with as much variety in personality, inspiration, energy and temperament as found in any other societal grouping – within our own internal ranks there will always be a degree of discord and divisions of opinion on such things as the relative merits of ‘pure’ versus ‘applied’ mathematics, research versus instruction, rigorous versus heuristic arguments, theoretical versus practical work, conceptual versus computational analysis, problem-solvers versus theory-builders, anonymous versus declared refereeing, solo versus collaborative efforts, and so on. Overlaying most of these, the very essence of research and publishing raises separate sources of emotive contention, as does the virtue of writing expositively which is discussed here based partly as a result of some recent survey work by the author that also forms a starting point for the piece.


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