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dc.contributor.authorSnook, Brent
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Dianna
dc.contributor.authorBull, Ray
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T16:13:26Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T16:13:26Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-21
dc.identifier.citationBrent, S., Brooks, D., Bull, R. (2015) A Lesson on Interrogations From Detainees: Predicting Self-Reported Confessions and Cooperation, Criminal Justice and Behavior, 42 (12):1243en
dc.identifier.issn0093-8548
dc.identifier.issn1552-3594
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0093854815604179
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620693
dc.description.abstractThe ability to predict confessions and cooperation from the elements of an interrogation was examined. Incarcerated men (N = 100) completed a 50-item questionnaire about their most recent police interrogation, and regression analyses were performed on self-reported decisions to confess and cooperate. Results showed that the likelihood of an interrogation resulting in a confession was greatest when evidence strength and score on a humanitarian interviewing scale were high, and when the detainee had few previous convictions or did not seek legal advice. We also found that the level of cooperation was greatest when the humanitarian interviewing score was high, and when previous convictions were low. The implications of the findings for interrogation practices are discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://cjb.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0093854815604179en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Criminal Justice and Behavioren
dc.subjectInterrogation techniquesen
dc.subjectDetaineesen
dc.subjectPoliceen
dc.subjectSuspectsen
dc.subjectRegressionen
dc.subjectOffendersen
dc.titleA lesson on interrogations from detainees: Predicting self-reported confessions and cooperationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalCriminal Justice and Behavioren
dc.internal.reviewer-noteThis jnl does not allow submission of publisher's pdfs. Author will need to be contacted. SER 6/7/16en
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T14:52:10Z
html.description.abstractThe ability to predict confessions and cooperation from the elements of an interrogation was examined. Incarcerated men (N = 100) completed a 50-item questionnaire about their most recent police interrogation, and regression analyses were performed on self-reported decisions to confess and cooperate. Results showed that the likelihood of an interrogation resulting in a confession was greatest when evidence strength and score on a humanitarian interviewing scale were high, and when the detainee had few previous convictions or did not seek legal advice. We also found that the level of cooperation was greatest when the humanitarian interviewing score was high, and when previous convictions were low. The implications of the findings for interrogation practices are discussed.


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