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dc.contributor.authorPaulo, Rui M.
dc.contributor.authorAlbuquerque, Pedro B.
dc.contributor.authorSaraiva, Magda
dc.contributor.authorBull, Ray
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T16:00:15Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T16:00:15Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-23
dc.identifier.citationPaulo, R., Albuquerque, P., Saraiva, M, Bull, R. (2015) 'The Enhanced Cognitive Interview: Testing Appropriateness Perception, Memory Capacity and Error Estimate Relation with Report Quality' Applied Cognitive Psychology 29 (4):536en
dc.identifier.issn08884080
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/acp.3132
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620692
dc.description.abstractThe Enhanced Cognitive Interview (ECI) has been widely studied. However, research has overlooked witnesses’ attitudes toward the interview and how error estimate and memory capacity relate to report quality. Participants watched a mock robbery video and were interviewed 48 hours later with either the Portuguese version of the ECI or a Structured Interview (SI). Participants interviewed with the ECI provided more information without compromising accuracy, particularly in free recall. Report accuracy was stable across interview phases and information categories. A higher perception of interview appropriateness (how witnesses evaluate the appropriateness of the interview procedure used) was linked with more detailed reports and more interest in being an interviewee. Participants over-estimated their error rate, and their memory capacity was not related to witnesses’ recall. It is essential to take into account their perception of interview appropriateness and use alternative methods to evaluate report quality. Major implications for real-life investigations are discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3132en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Applied Cognitive Psychologyen
dc.subjectCognitive psychologyen
dc.subjectInterviewen
dc.subjectCriminologyen
dc.subjectCriminal psychologyen
dc.titleThe enhanced cognitive interview: Testing appropriateness perception, memory capacity and error estimate relation with report qualityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Cognitive Psychologyen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Psychology; University of Minho; Campus de Gualtar Braga Portugal
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Psychology; University of Minho; Campus de Gualtar Braga Portugal
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Psychology; University of Minho; Campus de Gualtar Braga Portugal
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; University of Portsmouth; Portsmouth United Kingdom
dc.internal.reviewer-noteThis jnl does not allow submission of publisher's pdfs. Author will need to be contacted. SER 6/7/16en
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-03-17
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T14:52:04Z
html.description.abstractThe Enhanced Cognitive Interview (ECI) has been widely studied. However, research has overlooked witnesses’ attitudes toward the interview and how error estimate and memory capacity relate to report quality. Participants watched a mock robbery video and were interviewed 48 hours later with either the Portuguese version of the ECI or a Structured Interview (SI). Participants interviewed with the ECI provided more information without compromising accuracy, particularly in free recall. Report accuracy was stable across interview phases and information categories. A higher perception of interview appropriateness (how witnesses evaluate the appropriateness of the interview procedure used) was linked with more detailed reports and more interest in being an interviewee. Participants over-estimated their error rate, and their memory capacity was not related to witnesses’ recall. It is essential to take into account their perception of interview appropriateness and use alternative methods to evaluate report quality. Major implications for real-life investigations are discussed.


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