Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCayli, Baris
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-10T13:32:36Z
dc.date.available2016-10-10T13:32:36Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-21
dc.identifier.citationCayli, B. (2016) 'The zones of fragility: outlaws and the forms of violence in the Ottoman Empire', Journal of Historical Sociology, DOI: 10.1111/johs.12137.en
dc.identifier.issn1467-6443
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/johs.12137en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620537en
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the relationship between violence and power through examining the archival documents about the outlaws in the Ottoman Empire from 1852 to 1876. I argue that the outlaws and the use of violence in the public sphere defied the power of the Ottoman Empire. Thereof, the present study agrees with the main thesis of Hannah Arendt about the destructive influence of violence on power. However, I take Hannah Arendt's argument on violence one step further by claiming that the form of violence -whether political or non-political- loses its significance when both public safety and state sovereignty are under great threats at the same time in the zones of fragility.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe British Academyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/johs.12137/fullen
dc.subjectSociology of violenceen
dc.subjectCrimeen
dc.subjectOutlawsen
dc.subjectOttoman Empireen
dc.titleThe zones of fragility: outlaws and the forms of violence in the Ottoman Empireen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Historical Sociologyen
dc.date.accepted2016-07-20
html.description.abstractThis study explores the relationship between violence and power through examining the archival documents about the outlaws in the Ottoman Empire from 1852 to 1876. I argue that the outlaws and the use of violence in the public sphere defied the power of the Ottoman Empire. Thereof, the present study agrees with the main thesis of Hannah Arendt about the destructive influence of violence on power. However, I take Hannah Arendt's argument on violence one step further by claiming that the form of violence -whether political or non-political- loses its significance when both public safety and state sovereignty are under great threats at the same time in the zones of fragility.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
jhs cayli.pdf
Size:
118.5Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
article in Journal of Historical ...

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record