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dc.contributor.authorGaines, M.
dc.contributor.authorButler J. D.
dc.contributor.authorHolmwood, Clive
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-03T14:00:40Z
dc.date.available2016-10-03T14:00:40Z
dc.date.issued2015-04
dc.identifier.citationGaines A. M. Butler J. D. Holmwood C. (2015) (Submitted to International Drama Educational Association) Between Drama Education and Drama Therapy: International Approaches to Successful Navigation IDEA PARIS 2013" of p-e-r-f-o-r-m-a-n-c-e journal Vol 2 n°2en
dc.identifier.issn2426-3893
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/620530
dc.description.abstractThis article describes a workshop with approximately 30 drama educators, presented at the 2013 congress of the International Drama/Education Association (IDEA) that examined the overlap of drama education and drama therapy. Using the workshop experience as a backdrop, the authors discuss concepts within drama therapy that might serve to inform the use of emotion within the applied theatre space. The distinction between psychodrama and drama therapy is clarified and basic drama therapy concepts are explained. Contrary to the facilitators’ expectations, the workshop experience evoked several unifying questions and issues for participants: “How can we simultaneously address both ends of the emotional/expressive spectrum? How can I get my over-expressive students to settle down and participate so that I can attend to the less expressive students?” Questions of emotion regulation seemed to problematize classroom management concerns rather than galvanize discourse about boundaries between education and therapy. Through a dialogic exploration using forum theatre, the workshop participants engaged with their own relationship to the topics and explored potential solutions. The drama therapy concept of aesthetic distance was highlighted as a means to helping educational theatre practitioners navigate the potentially complex experiences when dealing with emotional involvement. This concept would allow for a clearer establishment of intrapersonal and interpersonal boundaries within the creation and exploration of theatre and drama. The article also calls for more substantial dialogues between applied drama/theatre professionals in order to more fully explore how to navigate the interstices between education and therapy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherp-e-r-f-o-r-m-a-n-c-een
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.p-e-r-f-o-r-m-a-n-c-e.org/?p=1223en
dc.subjectDrama educationen
dc.subjectDrama therapyen
dc.subjectInternationalen
dc.subjectNavigationen
dc.subjectDramatherapyen
dc.titleBetween drama education and drama therapy: international approaches to successful navigationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInternational Drama Education Associationen
html.description.abstractThis article describes a workshop with approximately 30 drama educators, presented at the 2013 congress of the International Drama/Education Association (IDEA) that examined the overlap of drama education and drama therapy. Using the workshop experience as a backdrop, the authors discuss concepts within drama therapy that might serve to inform the use of emotion within the applied theatre space. The distinction between psychodrama and drama therapy is clarified and basic drama therapy concepts are explained. Contrary to the facilitators’ expectations, the workshop experience evoked several unifying questions and issues for participants: “How can we simultaneously address both ends of the emotional/expressive spectrum? How can I get my over-expressive students to settle down and participate so that I can attend to the less expressive students?” Questions of emotion regulation seemed to problematize classroom management concerns rather than galvanize discourse about boundaries between education and therapy. Through a dialogic exploration using forum theatre, the workshop participants engaged with their own relationship to the topics and explored potential solutions. The drama therapy concept of aesthetic distance was highlighted as a means to helping educational theatre practitioners navigate the potentially complex experiences when dealing with emotional involvement. This concept would allow for a clearer establishment of intrapersonal and interpersonal boundaries within the creation and exploration of theatre and drama. The article also calls for more substantial dialogues between applied drama/theatre professionals in order to more fully explore how to navigate the interstices between education and therapy.


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