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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Miles
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorMaratos, Frances A.
dc.contributor.authorSheffield, David
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-05T13:14:37Z
dc.date.available2016-09-05T13:14:37Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-23
dc.identifier.citationRichardson, M. et al (2016) 'Joy and calm: How an evolutionary functional model of affect regulation informs positive emotions in nature', Evolutionary Psychological Science, 2 (4). DOI: 10.1007/s40806-016-0065-5.en
dc.identifier.issn2198-9885
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40806-016-0065-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/619856
dc.description.abstractKey theories of the human need for nature take an evolutionary perspective, and many of the mental well-being benefits of nature relate to positive affect. As affect has a physiological basis, it is important to consider these benefits alongside regulatory processes. However, research into nature and positive affect tends not to consider affect regulation and the neurophysiology of emotion. This brief systematic review and meta-analysis presents evidence to support the use of an existing evolutionary functional model of affect regulation (the three circle model of emotion) that provides a tripartite framework in which to consider the mental well-being benefits of nature and to guide nature-based well-being interventions. The model outlines drive, contentment and threat dimensions of affect regulation based on a review of the emotion regulation literature. The model has been used previously for understanding mental well-being, delivering successful mental health-care interventions and providing directions for future research. Finally, the three circle model is easily understood in the context of our everyday lives, providing an accessible physiological-based narrative to help explain the benefits of nature.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40806-016-0065-5en
dc.subjectAffect regulationen
dc.subjectPositive affecten
dc.subjectNeurophysiology of emotionen
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectWellbeingen
dc.titleJoy and calm: how an evolutionary functional model of affect regulation informs positive emotions in natureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEvolutionary Psychological Scienceen
refterms.dateFOA2017-08-23T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractKey theories of the human need for nature take an evolutionary perspective, and many of the mental well-being benefits of nature relate to positive affect. As affect has a physiological basis, it is important to consider these benefits alongside regulatory processes. However, research into nature and positive affect tends not to consider affect regulation and the neurophysiology of emotion. This brief systematic review and meta-analysis presents evidence to support the use of an existing evolutionary functional model of affect regulation (the three circle model of emotion) that provides a tripartite framework in which to consider the mental well-being benefits of nature and to guide nature-based well-being interventions. The model outlines drive, contentment and threat dimensions of affect regulation based on a review of the emotion regulation literature. The model has been used previously for understanding mental well-being, delivering successful mental health-care interventions and providing directions for future research. Finally, the three circle model is easily understood in the context of our everyday lives, providing an accessible physiological-based narrative to help explain the benefits of nature.


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