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dc.contributor.authorChilds, Carrie
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-06T13:14:45Z
dc.date.available2016-07-06T13:14:45Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-30
dc.identifier.citation'I'm not X, I just want Y': Formulating 'wants' in interaction 2012, 14 (2):181 Discourse Studiesen
dc.identifier.issn1461-4456
dc.identifier.issn1461-7080
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1461445612439819
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/615632
dc.description.abstractThis article provides a conversation analytic description of a two-part structure, ‘I don’t want X, I want/just want Y’. Drawing on a corpus of recordings of family mealtimes and television documentary data, I show how speakers use the structure in two recurrent environments. First, speakers may use the structure to reject a proposal regarding their actions made by an interlocutor. Second, speakers may deliver the structure following a co-interactant’s formulation of their actions or motivations. Both uses decrease the likelihood of challenge in third-turn position. When responding to multi-unit turns speakers routinely deal with the last item first. The value of ‘I want Y’ is to formulate an alternative sense of agency which undermines the preceding turn and shifts the trajectory of the ongoing sequence. The article contributes to work in discursive psychology as I show how speakers may formulate their ‘wants’ in the service of sequentially unfolding social interaction.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dis.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1461445612439819en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Discourse Studiesen
dc.subjectDiscursive psychologyen
dc.subjectConversation analysisen
dc.title'I'm not X, I just want Y': formulating 'wants' in interactionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLoughborough Universityen
dc.identifier.journalDiscourse Studiesen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T14:28:25Z
html.description.abstractThis article provides a conversation analytic description of a two-part structure, ‘I don’t want X, I want/just want Y’. Drawing on a corpus of recordings of family mealtimes and television documentary data, I show how speakers use the structure in two recurrent environments. First, speakers may use the structure to reject a proposal regarding their actions made by an interlocutor. Second, speakers may deliver the structure following a co-interactant’s formulation of their actions or motivations. Both uses decrease the likelihood of challenge in third-turn position. When responding to multi-unit turns speakers routinely deal with the last item first. The value of ‘I want Y’ is to formulate an alternative sense of agency which undermines the preceding turn and shifts the trajectory of the ongoing sequence. The article contributes to work in discursive psychology as I show how speakers may formulate their ‘wants’ in the service of sequentially unfolding social interaction.


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