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dc.contributor.authorAreh, Igor
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Dave
dc.contributor.authorBull, Ray
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-31T15:23:19Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-31T15:23:19Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-23en
dc.identifier.citationAreh, I. et al (2015) 'Police interrogation practice in Slovenia', Psychology, Crime & Law, 22 (5):405en
dc.identifier.issn1068-316Xen
dc.identifier.issn1477-2744en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1068316X.2015.1114113en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/611246en
dc.description.abstractInterrogation techniques are well explored, but in Slovenia it has remained unknown what interrogation techniques are used and what the basic characteristics of suspect interrogations are. The Slovenian interrogation manual proposes some coercive interrogation techniques and neglects their weaknesses. The aim of the current study was to examine Slovenian police officers’ beliefs as to the basic characteristics of their interrogations and whether techniques proposed by the manual are used in practice to begin to provide some insight into what actually happens in such interrogations. A survey instrument was used to obtain selfreport data from a sample of criminal investigators. From 86 completed questionnaires it was found that a typical interrogation of a suspect lasts around 90 minutes and is not recorded. Interviewers typically use three interrogation techniques namely (i) conducting interrogations in isolation; (ii) identifying contradictions in the suspect’s story; and (iii) confronting the suspect with evidence. Findings suggest that some coercive interrogation techniques are used in practice (e.g. offering moral justifications, alluding to have evidence of guilt, good cop/bad cop routine, and minimization). The study is the first insight into the practices of Slovenian investigators when questioning suspects. Differences among general, white-collar and organized crime investigators are also discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1068316X.2015.1114113en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychology, Crime & Lawen
dc.subjectPoliceen
dc.subjectInterrogation of suspectsen
dc.subjectInterrogation techniquesen
dc.subjectCoercionen
dc.titlePolice interrogation practice in Sloveniaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalPsychology, Crime & Lawen
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-08-26
refterms.dateFOA2016-12-23T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractInterrogation techniques are well explored, but in Slovenia it has remained unknown what interrogation techniques are used and what the basic characteristics of suspect interrogations are. The Slovenian interrogation manual proposes some coercive interrogation techniques and neglects their weaknesses. The aim of the current study was to examine Slovenian police officers’ beliefs as to the basic characteristics of their interrogations and whether techniques proposed by the manual are used in practice to begin to provide some insight into what actually happens in such interrogations. A survey instrument was used to obtain selfreport data from a sample of criminal investigators. From 86 completed questionnaires it was found that a typical interrogation of a suspect lasts around 90 minutes and is not recorded. Interviewers typically use three interrogation techniques namely (i) conducting interrogations in isolation; (ii) identifying contradictions in the suspect’s story; and (iii) confronting the suspect with evidence. Findings suggest that some coercive interrogation techniques are used in practice (e.g. offering moral justifications, alluding to have evidence of guilt, good cop/bad cop routine, and minimization). The study is the first insight into the practices of Slovenian investigators when questioning suspects. Differences among general, white-collar and organized crime investigators are also discussed.


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