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dc.contributor.authorCherkassky, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-21T17:42:30Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-21T17:42:30Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-10en
dc.identifier.citationCherkassky, L. (2016) 'The interfamilial principle and the harvest festival', European Journal of Health Law, 23 (1):61en
dc.identifier.issn0929-0273en
dc.identifier.issn1571-8093en
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/15718093-12341379en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/610536en
dc.description.abstractIt is widely accepted that younger children can act as saviour siblings by donating cord blood or bone marrow to their gravely-ill brothers or sisters. However, it is under dispute whether these procedures are in the best interests of the child. This article suggests that parents may be relying on a thinly-veiled interfamilial approach, where the wider benefit to the whole family is used to justify the procedure to the Human Tissue Authority in the United Kingdom. This article suggests that the merging of familial interests to validate a non-therapeutic bone marrow harvest on a child forces altruism in a patient too young to understand, rendering the harvests unlawful under current law.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKoninklijke Brill NVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/10.1163/15718093-12341379en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European Journal of Health Lawen
dc.subjectHuman tissue authorityen
dc.subjectInterfamilial principleen
dc.titleThe interfamilial principle and the harvest festivalen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Health Lawen
refterms.dateFOA2018-02-10T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractIt is widely accepted that younger children can act as saviour siblings by donating cord blood or bone marrow to their gravely-ill brothers or sisters. However, it is under dispute whether these procedures are in the best interests of the child. This article suggests that parents may be relying on a thinly-veiled interfamilial approach, where the wider benefit to the whole family is used to justify the procedure to the Human Tissue Authority in the United Kingdom. This article suggests that the merging of familial interests to validate a non-therapeutic bone marrow harvest on a child forces altruism in a patient too young to understand, rendering the harvests unlawful under current law.


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