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dc.contributor.authorHuck, Maren
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Duque, Eduardo
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-21T17:34:02Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-21T17:34:02Zen
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationHUCK, M. & FERNANDEZ-DUQUE, E. (2012). Building babies when dads help: infant development of owl monkeys and other primates with allo-maternal care. In: Building Babies: Primate Development in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective (Ed. by Clancy, K., Hinde, K. & Rutherford, J.). New York: Springer, pp 361-385. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-4060-4_16en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4614-4059-8en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4614-4060-4en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/610534en
dc.description.abstractIn contrast to birds, male mammals rarely help to raise the offspring. Of all mammals, only among rodents, carnivores, and primates, males are sometimes intensively engaged in providing infant care (Kleiman and Malcolm 1981). Male caretaking of infants has long been recognized in nonhuman primates (Itani 1959). Given that infant care behavior can have a positive effect on the infant’s development, growth, well-being, or survival, why are male mammals not more frequently involved in “building babies”? We begin the chapter defining a few relevant terms and introducing the theory and hypotheses that have historically addressed the evolution of paternal care. We then review empirical findings on male care among primate taxa, before focusing, in the final section, on our own work on paternal care in South American owl monkeys (Aotus spp.). We conclude the chapter with some suggestions for future studies.
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (HU 1746/2-1) Wenner-Gren Foundation, the L.S.B. Leakey Foundation, the National Geographic Society, the National Science Foundation (BCS-0621020), the University of Pennsylvania Research Foundation, the Zoological Society of San Diegoen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectAotus azaraeen
dc.subjectnight monkeyen
dc.subjectcarryingen
dc.subjectdispersalen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectmale careen
dc.subjectmating efforten
dc.subjectowl monkeyen
dc.subjectpaternal careen
dc.titleWhen Dads Help: Male Behavioral Care During Primate Infant Developmenten
dc.title.alternativeBuilding Babies - Chapter 16en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentGerman Primate Centre , Department Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology, Göttingen, Germanyen
dc.contributor.departmentCentro de Ecología Aplicada del Litoral, Conicet, Argentinaen
dc.internal.reviewer-noteAcademic emailed (24.2.2016) to ask for confirmation of permission from publisher to include chapter in UDORA. Thanks Emma Author confirmed permission has been granted (LA 20/5/16)en
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T14:21:04Z
html.description.abstractIn contrast to birds, male mammals rarely help to raise the offspring. Of all mammals, only among rodents, carnivores, and primates, males are sometimes intensively engaged in providing infant care (Kleiman and Malcolm 1981). Male caretaking of infants has long been recognized in nonhuman primates (Itani 1959). Given that infant care behavior can have a positive effect on the infant’s development, growth, well-being, or survival, why are male mammals not more frequently involved in “building babies”? We begin the chapter defining a few relevant terms and introducing the theory and hypotheses that have historically addressed the evolution of paternal care. We then review empirical findings on male care among primate taxa, before focusing, in the final section, on our own work on paternal care in South American owl monkeys (Aotus spp.). We conclude the chapter with some suggestions for future studies.


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