• Customized medicine for corals

      Sweet, Michael; Peixoto, Raquel; Bourne, David; University of Derby; Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; IMAM-AquaRio – Rio de Janeiro Aquarium Research Center, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; University of California; James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia; Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, QLD, Australia (Frontiers, 2019-11-13)
    • A global synthesis of plant extinction rates in urban areas.

      Hahs, Amy K.; McDonnell, Mark J.; McCarthy, Michael A.; Vesk, Peter A.; Corlett, Richard T.; Norton, Briony, A.; Clemants, Steven E.; Duncan, Richard P.; Thompson, Ken; Schwartz, Mark W.; et al. (Wiley, 2009-10-13)
      Plant extinctions from urban areas are a growing threat to biodiversity worldwide. To minimize this threat, it is critical to understand what factors are influencing plant extinction rates. We compiled plant extinction rate data for 22 cities around the world. Two‐thirds of the variation in plant extinction rates was explained by a combination of the city’s historical development and the current proportion of native vegetation, with the former explaining the greatest variability. As a single variable, the amount of native vegetation remaining also influenced extinction rates, particularly in cities > 200 years old. Our study demonstrates that the legacies of landscape transformations by agrarian and urban development last for hundreds of years, and modern cities potentially carry a large extinction debt. This finding highlights the importance of preserving native vegetation in urban areas and the need for mitigation to minimize potential plant extinctions in the future.
    • Heat waves are a major threat to turbid coral reefs in Brazil

      Duarte, Gustavo A. S.; Villela, Helena D. M.; Deocleciano, Matheus; Silva, Denise; Barno, Adam; Cardoso, Pedro M.; Vilela, Caren L. S.; Rosado, Phillipe; Messias, Camila S. M. A.; Chacon, Maria Alejandra; et al. (Frontiers Media SA, 2020-03-30)
      Coral reefs are threatened by climate change on a global scale with thermal stress events and mass coral bleaching being widely reported. The reefs off the east coast of Brazil (and other turbid areas) have, however, historically escaped such thermal stress events, with relatively low levels of background coral mortality (5–10%). This has recently changed. Here we show that, in 2019, degree heating weeks (DHW) of 19.65 coincided with catastrophic declines in coral cover, especially in the major reef building hydrocoral Millepora alcicornis. The decline was due to bleaching associated with exposure to high temperature stress culminating in DHW values exceeding 15 for a period of 50 days. At two independent sites, surveys showed upwards of 83.5 ± 9.0 and 89.1 ± 3.9% mortality, and a third site showed relatively lower (albeit still high) mortality rates of 43.3 ± 12.0%. The mass die-off in 2019 is unprecedented in the South Atlantic reefs and coincides with increased heating events.
    • The “resort effect”: Can tourist islands act as refuges for coral reef species?

      Moritz, Charlotte; Ducarme, Frédéric; Sweet, Michael J.; Fox, Michael D.; Zgliczynski, Brian; Ibrahim, Nizam; Basheer, Ahmed; Furby, Kathryn A.; Caldwell, Zachary R.; Pisapia, Chiara; et al. (Wiley, 2017-09-13)
      There is global consensus that marine protected areas offer a plethora of benefits to the biodiversity within and around them. Nevertheless, many organisms threatened by human impacts also find shelter in unexpected or informally protected places. For coral reef organisms, refuges can be tourist resorts implementing local environment-friendly bottom-up management strategies. We used the coral reef ecosystem as a model to test whether such practices have positive effects on the biodiversity associated with de facto protected areas.