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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Miles
dc.contributor.authorSheffield, David
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-13T09:50:01Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-13T09:50:01Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09-28en
dc.identifier.citationRichardson, M., & Sheffield, D. (2015). Reflective self-attention: A more stable predictor of connection to nature than mindful attention. Ecopsychology, 7 (3), 166-175.en
dc.identifier.issn19429347en
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/eco.2015.0010en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/579592en
dc.description.abstractThere is much to be gained from understanding the individual differences that predict our connection to nature, as those that are more connected tend to be more caring towards the environment and benefit from better well-being. Study 1 (n=137) found that reflective self-attention and mindful attention significantly predicted connection to nature, while anxious self-attention had a borderline significant negative association. With the introduction of personality measures, study 2 (n=161) found that reflective self-attention and openness had a stronger relationship to nature connection than mindful attention. Study 3 (n=99) found reflective self-attention, rather than mindful attention, to be associated with an increase in connection to nature. A pre-reflective and intentional self-attention account of nature connectedness is proposed with intentional self-reflection being a stronger factor than mindful attention.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishersen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1089/eco.2015.0010
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectConnection to natureen
dc.subjectPersonalityen
dc.subjectSelf-attentionen
dc.titleReflective self-attention: A more stable predictor of connection to nature than mindful attention.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEcopsychologyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T13:56:16Z
html.description.abstractThere is much to be gained from understanding the individual differences that predict our connection to nature, as those that are more connected tend to be more caring towards the environment and benefit from better well-being. Study 1 (n=137) found that reflective self-attention and mindful attention significantly predicted connection to nature, while anxious self-attention had a borderline significant negative association. With the introduction of personality measures, study 2 (n=161) found that reflective self-attention and openness had a stronger relationship to nature connection than mindful attention. Study 3 (n=99) found reflective self-attention, rather than mindful attention, to be associated with an increase in connection to nature. A pre-reflective and intentional self-attention account of nature connectedness is proposed with intentional self-reflection being a stronger factor than mindful attention.


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