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dc.contributor.authorLuo, Junlong
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xin
dc.contributor.authorStupple, Edward J. N.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Entao
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Xiao
dc.contributor.authorJia, Lei
dc.contributor.authorYang, Qun
dc.contributor.authorLi, Haijiang
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Qinglin
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T15:10:07Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-05T15:10:07Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06en
dc.identifier.citationLuo, Junlong, Liu, Xin, Stupple, Edward J. N., et al (2013) Cognitive control in belief-laden reasoning during conclusion processing: An ERP study, International Journal of Psychology, 48 (3):224en
dc.identifier.issn0020-7594en
dc.identifier.issn1464-066Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207594.2012.677539en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/565661en
dc.description.abstractBelief bias is the tendency to accept conclusions that are compatible with existing beliefs more frequently than those that contradict beliefs. It is one of the most replicated behavioral findings in the reasoning literature. Recently, neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs) have provided a new perspective and have demonstrated neural correlates of belief bias that have been viewed as supportive of dual-process theories of belief bias. However, fMRI studies have tended to focus on conclusion processing, while ERPs studies have been concerned with the processing of premises. In the present research, the electrophysiological correlates of cognitive control were studied among 12 subjects using high-density ERPs. The analysis was focused on the conclusion presentation phase and was limited to normatively sanctioned responses to valid–believable and valid–unbelievable problems. Results showed that when participants gave normatively sanctioned responses to problems where belief and logic conflicted, a more positive ERP deflection was elicited than for normatively sanctioned responses to nonconflict problems. This was observed from −400 to −200 ms prior to the correct response being given. The positive component is argued to be analogous to the late positive component (LPC) involved in cognitive control processes. This is consistent with the inhibition of empirically anomalous information when conclusions are unbelievable. These data are important in elucidating the neural correlates of belief bias by providing evidence for electrophysiological correlates of conflict resolution during conclusion processing. Moreover, they are supportive of dual-process theories of belief bias that propose conflict detection and resolution processes as central to the explanation of belief bias.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1080/00207594.2012.677539en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Psychologyen
dc.subjectReasoningen
dc.subjectBelief biasen
dc.subjectCognitive controlen
dc.subjectDual processingen
dc.subjectEvent-related potentialsen
dc.subjectLate positive compenenten
dc.titleCognitive control in belief-laden reasoning during conclusion processing: An ERP studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Psychologyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T13:50:28Z
html.description.abstractBelief bias is the tendency to accept conclusions that are compatible with existing beliefs more frequently than those that contradict beliefs. It is one of the most replicated behavioral findings in the reasoning literature. Recently, neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs) have provided a new perspective and have demonstrated neural correlates of belief bias that have been viewed as supportive of dual-process theories of belief bias. However, fMRI studies have tended to focus on conclusion processing, while ERPs studies have been concerned with the processing of premises. In the present research, the electrophysiological correlates of cognitive control were studied among 12 subjects using high-density ERPs. The analysis was focused on the conclusion presentation phase and was limited to normatively sanctioned responses to valid–believable and valid–unbelievable problems. Results showed that when participants gave normatively sanctioned responses to problems where belief and logic conflicted, a more positive ERP deflection was elicited than for normatively sanctioned responses to nonconflict problems. This was observed from −400 to −200 ms prior to the correct response being given. The positive component is argued to be analogous to the late positive component (LPC) involved in cognitive control processes. This is consistent with the inhibition of empirically anomalous information when conclusions are unbelievable. These data are important in elucidating the neural correlates of belief bias by providing evidence for electrophysiological correlates of conflict resolution during conclusion processing. Moreover, they are supportive of dual-process theories of belief bias that propose conflict detection and resolution processes as central to the explanation of belief bias.


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