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dc.contributor.authorLuo, Junlong
dc.contributor.authorTang, Xiaochen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Entao
dc.contributor.authorStupple, Edward J. N.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T08:06:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-05T08:06:51Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09-27en
dc.identifier.citationLuo, Junlong, Tang, Xiaochen, Zhang, Entao, Stupple, Edward J.N. (2014) The neural correlates of belief-bias inhibition: The impact of logic training, Biological Psychology, Vol.103, pp. 276-282en
dc.identifier.issn03010511en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.09.010en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/565088en
dc.description.abstractFunctional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the brain activity associated with response change in a belief bias paradigm before and after logic training. Participants completed two sets of belief biased reasoning tasks. In the first set they were instructed to respond based on their empirical beliefs, and in the second – following logic training – they were instructed to respond logically. The comparison between conflict problems in the second scan versus in the first scan revealed differing activation for the left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, cerebellum, and precuneus. The scan was time locked to the presentation of the minor premise, and thus demonstrated effects of belief–logic conflict on neural activation earlier in the time course than has previously been shown in fMRI. These data, moreover, indicated that logical training results in changes in brain activity associated with cognitive control processing.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301051114002117en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Biological Psychologyen
dc.subjectfMRIen
dc.subjectReasoningen
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.titleThe neural correlates of belief-bias inhibition: The impact of logic trainingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalBiological Psychologyen
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-09-18
refterms.dateFOA2015-12-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractFunctional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the brain activity associated with response change in a belief bias paradigm before and after logic training. Participants completed two sets of belief biased reasoning tasks. In the first set they were instructed to respond based on their empirical beliefs, and in the second – following logic training – they were instructed to respond logically. The comparison between conflict problems in the second scan versus in the first scan revealed differing activation for the left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, cerebellum, and precuneus. The scan was time locked to the presentation of the minor premise, and thus demonstrated effects of belief–logic conflict on neural activation earlier in the time course than has previously been shown in fMRI. These data, moreover, indicated that logical training results in changes in brain activity associated with cognitive control processing.


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