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dc.contributor.authorMeijen, Carla
dc.contributor.authorJones, Marc V.
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Paul J.
dc.contributor.authorSheffield, David
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Mark S.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-07T14:34:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-07T14:34:54Zen
dc.date.issued2013-04en
dc.identifier.citationCognitive and affective components of challenge and threat states 2013, 31 (8):847 Journal of Sports Sciencesen
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414en
dc.identifier.issn1466-447Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640414.2012.753157en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/552483en
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship among cardiovascular responses indicative of challenge and threat states, self-efficacy, perceived control and emotions before an upcoming competition. Using a repeated-measures design, 48 collegiate athletes talked about an upcoming competition (sport-specific speech task) and the topic of friendship (control speech task), whilst cardiovascular responses (heart rate, preejection period, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance) were collected and self-report measures of self-efficacy, perceived control, and emotions completed. Findings showed that participants with a physiological threat response reported higher levels of self-efficacy and excitement. Further, none of the other emotions or the cognitive appraisals of challenge and threat predicted cardiovascular patterns indicative of either a challenge or threat state. Thus, cardiovascular responses and self-report measures of self-efficacy, perceived control, and emotions did not correlate in the manner predicted by the theory of challenge and threat states in athletes. This finding may reflect methodological aspects, or that perhaps highly efficacious individuals believe they can perform well and so the task itself is more threatening because failure would indicate under-performance.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2012.753157en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Sports Sciencesen
dc.subjectStress and copingen
dc.subjectChallenge hypothesisen
dc.titleCognitive and affective components of challenge and threat statesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentStaffordshire Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
refterms.dateFOA2015-10-31T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship among cardiovascular responses indicative of challenge and threat states, self-efficacy, perceived control and emotions before an upcoming competition. Using a repeated-measures design, 48 collegiate athletes talked about an upcoming competition (sport-specific speech task) and the topic of friendship (control speech task), whilst cardiovascular responses (heart rate, preejection period, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance) were collected and self-report measures of self-efficacy, perceived control, and emotions completed. Findings showed that participants with a physiological threat response reported higher levels of self-efficacy and excitement. Further, none of the other emotions or the cognitive appraisals of challenge and threat predicted cardiovascular patterns indicative of either a challenge or threat state. Thus, cardiovascular responses and self-report measures of self-efficacy, perceived control, and emotions did not correlate in the manner predicted by the theory of challenge and threat states in athletes. This finding may reflect methodological aspects, or that perhaps highly efficacious individuals believe they can perform well and so the task itself is more threatening because failure would indicate under-performance.


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