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dc.contributor.authorBryson, David
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-25T11:42:24Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-25T11:42:24Zen
dc.date.issued2012-03en
dc.identifier.citationBryson, David, "Using flashcards to support your learning." Journal of Visual Communication in Medicine, March 2012, 35 (1):25-9en
dc.identifier.issn1745-3062en
dc.identifier.pmid22397481en
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/17453054.2012.655720en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/550618en
dc.description.abstractThe idea that if you listen to a lecture and make notes you will, by some mysterious process, have learnt all that the lecturer has covered, is a myth. Unfortunately, the lecture is just the start. The best way to learn is by doing. This can be achieved by completing set practical tasks by reading and creating your own notes, listening again to parts or the whole of a lecture via a screencast or using diagrams and illustrations that you annotate. Similarly creating your own learning materials can be useful as actually putting questions and answers together helps you to learn. One of the many ways to support your learning, especially in difficult topics like anatomy and physiology, learning about bones, medical terminology or indeed any subject where there are a lot of new words and terms to learn, is making use of an old technique brought up to date with new technologies called "flashcards".
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of visual communication in medicineen
dc.subjectFlashcardsen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subject.meshAudiovisual Aidsen
dc.subject.meshComputers, Handhelden
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLearningen
dc.subject.meshSoftwareen
dc.subject.meshTeaching Materialsen
dc.titleUsing flashcards to support your learning.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Visual Communication in Medicineen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T13:45:57Z
html.description.abstractThe idea that if you listen to a lecture and make notes you will, by some mysterious process, have learnt all that the lecturer has covered, is a myth. Unfortunately, the lecture is just the start. The best way to learn is by doing. This can be achieved by completing set practical tasks by reading and creating your own notes, listening again to parts or the whole of a lecture via a screencast or using diagrams and illustrations that you annotate. Similarly creating your own learning materials can be useful as actually putting questions and answers together helps you to learn. One of the many ways to support your learning, especially in difficult topics like anatomy and physiology, learning about bones, medical terminology or indeed any subject where there are a lot of new words and terms to learn, is making use of an old technique brought up to date with new technologies called "flashcards".


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