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dc.contributor.authorLennox, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-01T14:00:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-01T14:00:46Zen
dc.date.issued2009-09en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/347428en
dc.description.abstractHuman spatial perception is how we understand places. Beyond understanding what is where (William James’ formulation of the psychological approach to perception); there are holistic qualities to places. We perceive places as busy, crowded, exciting, threatening or peaceful, calm, comfortable and so on. Designers of places spend a great deal of time and effort on these qualities; scientists rarely do. In the scientific world-view physical qualities and our emotive responses to them are neatly divided in the objective-subjective dichotomy. In this context, music has traditionally constituted an item in a place. Over the last two decades, development of “spatial music” has been within the prevailing engineering paradigm, informed by psychophysical data; here, space is an abstract, Euclidean 3-dimensional ‘container’ for events. The emotional consequence of spatial arrangements is not the main focus in this approach. This paper argues that a paradigm shift is appropriate, from ‘music-in-a-place’ to ‘music-as-a-place’ requiring a fundamental philosophical realignment of ‘meaning’ away from subjective response to include consequences-in-the-environment. Hence the hegemony of the subjective-objective dichotomy is questioned. There are precedents for this, for example in the ecological approach to perception (Gibson). An ecological approach to music-as-environment intrinsically treats the emotional consequences of spatio-musical arrangement holistically. A simplified taxonomy of the attributes of artificial spatial sound in this context will be discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Conference on Music and Emotion, Durham, UKen
dc.relation.urlhttp://vbn.aau.dk/files/42987437/music_and_emotion.2009.prog.pdfen
dc.relation.urlhttps://derby.academia.edu/peterlennox/Papersen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Lennox/contributionsen
dc.subjectSpatial compositionen
dc.subjectSpatial auditionen
dc.subjectSpatial musicen
dc.subjectEmotionen
dc.titleThe emotional contents of the ‘space’ in spatial musicen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T13:40:52Z
html.description.abstractHuman spatial perception is how we understand places. Beyond understanding what is where (William James’ formulation of the psychological approach to perception); there are holistic qualities to places. We perceive places as busy, crowded, exciting, threatening or peaceful, calm, comfortable and so on. Designers of places spend a great deal of time and effort on these qualities; scientists rarely do. In the scientific world-view physical qualities and our emotive responses to them are neatly divided in the objective-subjective dichotomy. In this context, music has traditionally constituted an item in a place. Over the last two decades, development of “spatial music” has been within the prevailing engineering paradigm, informed by psychophysical data; here, space is an abstract, Euclidean 3-dimensional ‘container’ for events. The emotional consequence of spatial arrangements is not the main focus in this approach. This paper argues that a paradigm shift is appropriate, from ‘music-in-a-place’ to ‘music-as-a-place’ requiring a fundamental philosophical realignment of ‘meaning’ away from subjective response to include consequences-in-the-environment. Hence the hegemony of the subjective-objective dichotomy is questioned. There are precedents for this, for example in the ecological approach to perception (Gibson). An ecological approach to music-as-environment intrinsically treats the emotional consequences of spatio-musical arrangement holistically. A simplified taxonomy of the attributes of artificial spatial sound in this context will be discussed.


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