• Underestimation of COVID-19 cases in Japan: an analysis of RT-PCR testing for COVID-19 among 47 prefectures in Japan

      Sawano, Toyoaki; Kotera, Yasuhiro; Ozaki, Akihiko; Murayama, Anju; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Sah, Ranjit; Wang, Jiwei; Fukushima Medical University, Japan; University of Derby; Tohoku University, Japan; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2020-06-19)
      Under the unique Japanese policy to restrict reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, a nationwide number of its confirmed cases and mortality remains to be low. Yet the information is lacking on geographical differences of these measures and their associated factors. Evaluation of prefecture-based geographical differences and associated predictors for the incidence and number of RT-PCR tests for COVID-19. Cross-sectional study using regression and correlation analysis. We retrieved domestic laboratory-confirmed cases, deaths, and the number of RT-PCR testing for COVID-19 from January 15 to April 6, 2020 in 47 prefectures in Japan, using publicly-available data by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. We did descriptive analyses of these three measures and identified significant predictors for the incidence and RT-PCR testing through multiple regression analyses and correlates with the number of deaths through correlation analysis. The median prefectural-level incidence and number of RT-PCR testing per 100,000 population were 1.14 and 38.6, respectively. Multiple regression analyses revealed that significant predictors for the incidence were prefectural-level population (p < 0.001) and the number of RT-PCR testing (p = 0.03); and those for RT-PCR testing were the incidence (p = 0.025), available beds (p = 0.045) and cluster infections (p = 0.034). Considering bidirectional association between the incidence and RT-PCR testing, there may have been an underdiagnosed population for the infection. The restraint policy for RT-PCR testing should be revisited to meet the increasing demand under the COVID-19 epidemic.
    • Using a research-informed interprofessional curriculum framework to guide reflection and future planning of interprofessional education in a multi-site context

      Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; University of Curtin (Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing Press, 2015-03)
      Background: Over the past two years health educators in Australia have benefited from funding made available from national organizations such as the Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) and Health Workforce Australia (HWA). Funded research has been conducted into educational activities across the country that aim to promote integrated and sustainable interprofessional learning. Methods and Findings: A collaboration between multiple stakeholders led to the establishment of a consortium of nine universities and interprofessional organizations. This collaboration resulted in a series of research studies and the development of a conceptual framework to guide the planning and review of interprofessional health curricula. A case study of the development of a suite of health education programs at a regional university in Australia is used to demonstrate how the framework can be used to guide curricular reflection and to plan for the future. Shedding a light on interprofessional health education activities across multiple sites provides a rich picture of current practices and future trends. Commonalities, gaps, and challenges become much more obvious and allow for the development of shared opportunities and solutions. Conclusions: The production of a shared conceptual framework to facilitate interprofessional curriculum development provides valuable strategies for curricular reflection, review, and forward planning.
    • Using a research-informed interprofessional curriculum framework to guide reflection and future planning of Interprofessional Education in a Multi-site Context

      Moran, Monica Catherine; Steketee, Carole; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; University of Derby (2015-03)
      Abstract Background: Over the past two years health educators in Australia have benefited from funding made available from national organizations such as the Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) and Health Workforce Australia (HWA). Funded research has been conducted into educational activities across the country that aim to promote integrated and sustainable interprofessional learning. Methods and Findings: A collaboration between multiple stakeholders led to the establishment of a consortium of nine universities and interprofessional organizations. This collaboration resulted in a series of research studies and the development of a conceptual framework to guide the planning and review of interprofessional health curricula. A case study of the development of a suite of health education programs at a regional university in Australia is used to demonstrate how the framework can be used to guide curricular reflection and to plan for the future. Shedding a light on interprofessional health education activities across multiple sites provides a rich picture of current practices and future trends. Commonalities, gaps, and challenges become much more obvious and allow for the development of shared opportunities and solutions. Conclusions: The production of a shared conceptual framework to facilitate interprofessional curriculum development provides valuable strategies for curricular reflection, review, and forward planning.
    • Validation of a scale for assessing social validity in mindfulness-based education programs

      López-González, L.; Herrero-Fernández, D.; Amutio, A.; Santamaría, T.; Van Gordon, William; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-03-30)
      Social validity (SV) is a concept used in intervention research and is concerned with the overall acceptability, relevance, and utility of an intervention to all intervention stakeholders. SV not only takes into account efficacy in respect of the pre-defined study outcomes, but also participants’ perceptions of the intervention as well as the wider social context in which it will be applied. There are a growing number of mindfulness-based educational programs (MBEPs) being empirically evaluated and implemented in educational settings. However, due to a lack of scientifically validated instruments that can assess SV in MBEPs, a systematic evaluation of SV in such programs has not been undertaken to date. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Social Validity Scale of Mindfulness-Based Programs for Adolescents (Escala de Validez Social de Programas de Mindfulness para Adolescentes—EVSPM-A), composed of 20 items. The sample comprised 512 compulsory secondary education and high school students (mean age = 14.5; SD = 1.57) from three Spanish educational centers that had completed an MBEP known as the TREVA Program. Results The final version of the scale showed good psychometric properties and factor analyses yielded five factors: global impact-satisfaction, acceptance and viability, individual perceived effectiveness, perceived classroom climate; training feasibility, and applicability of techniques. The EVSPM-A appears to be a suitable means of assessing SV in MBEPs delivered to adolescents. Using the EVSPM-A to evaluate SV can help improve the implementation and long-term efficacy of MBEPs.
    • The value of art therapy in antenatal and postnatal care: A brief literature review with recommendations for future research

      Hogan, Susan; Sheffield, David; Woodward, Amelia; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2017-09-01)
      There is a very small body of literature addressing the use of the arts or art therapy in antenatal and post-natal care, and much of it is qualitative, including some rich and complex data which is worthy of discussion and consideration. Overall, it points to a promising use of supportive and therapeutic arts in this area. This article presents some background on the use of the arts specifically focusing on post-natal depression and birth trauma. It then moves on to present a brief survey of literature in the field, followed by some further reflections and discussion about further research needed to establish clinical utility and economic viability.
    • Volumetric 3D displays.

      Blundell, Barry G.; Auckland University of Technology (Springer, 2016)
      Volumetric displays enable electronically processed images to be depicted within a transparent volume, and so they are able to occupy three spatial dimensions. A broad range of depth cues are inherently associated with such images, including the parallax and oculomotor cues. Accommodation-convergence breakdown and depth cue conflict are avoided. Here we review aspects of this display modality, identify various key characteristics, and refer to a number of exemplar technologies. Brief consideration is given to the formation of opaque images and the implementation of an ethereal form of image space.
    • Who thrives under pressure? predicting the performance of elite academy cricketers using the cardiovascular indicators of challenge and threat states

      Turner, Martin J.; Jones, Marc V.; Sheffield, David; Slater, Matthew J.; Barker, Jamie B.; Bell, James J.; Staffordshire University, Centre for Sport, Health and Exercise Research; University of Derby, Centre for Psychological Research (2013-08)
      This study assessed whether cardiovascular (CV) reactivity patterns indexing challenge and threat states predicted batting performance in elite male county (N = 12) and national (N = 30) academy cricketers. Participants completed a batting test under pressure, before which CV reactivity was recorded in response to ego-threatening audio instructions. Self-reported self-efficacy, control, achievement goals, and emotions were also assessed. Challenge CV reactivity predicted superior performance in the Batting Test, compared with threat CV reactivity. The relationships between self-report measures and CV reactivity, and self-report measures and performance were inconsistent. A small subsample of participants who exhibited threat CV reactivity, but performed well, reported greater self-efficacy than participants who exhibited threat CV reactivity, but performed poorly. Also a small subsample of participants who exhibited challenge reactivity, but performed poorly, had higher avoidance goals than participants with challenge reactivity who performed well. The mechanisms for the observed relationship between CV reactivity and performance are discussed alongside implications for future research and applied practice.
    • Work based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach.

      Thistlethwaite, Jill; Forman, Dawn; Dunston, Roger; Moran, Monica Catherine; University of Derby (Office for Learning and Teaching Australia, 2015)
      This report Work-based assessment of teamwork: an interprofessional approach describes the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) funded project of the same name. It focuses on the rationale for, the development of and the piloting of a tool for observing and giving feedback on an individual student’s behavior in an interprofessional team based activity. The study was conducted during 2012–2014 with a project team initially led by the University of Queensland, and included team members from five Australian universities in three states (University of Queensland, University of Technology Sydney, The University of Sydney, Central Queensland University and Curtin University), as well as from the UK (University of Derby) and Canada (University of British Columbia).
    • Work-life balance of UK construction workers: Relationship with mental health

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Green, Pauline; Sheffield, David; UDOL (Taylor & Francis, 2019-06-18)
      Although the importance of work-life balance (WLB) is related to occupational psychological outcomes in many countries and industries, these relationships have not been explored in UK construction industry, a major sector of the UK economy. This workforce suffers from high rates of mental health problems and low help-seeking. Accordingly, the purposes of this study were to explore relationships between WLB, mental health, attitudes towards mental health problems, along with work schedules. One hundred and forty-four UK workers in the construction industry completed measures of those three constructs. WLB was negatively associated with mental health problems, and mental health attitudes. Mental health attitudes did not mediate the relationship between WLB and mental health problems with a small effect size. WLB was the strongest predictor of mental health problems. Mental health problems scores differed by work pattern groups; day time workers had poorer mental health than mixed workers. Findings will help UK construction workers, employers, and organisational researchers deepen their understanding of WLB and identify better solutions to poor WLB and mental health.
    • World index of moral freedom: WIMF 2020

      Álvarez, Gloria; Kotera, Yasuhiro; Pina, Juan; University of Derby; Foundation for the Advancement of Liberty (Foundation for the Advancement of Liberty, 2020-07)
    • The yips in sport: A systematic review

      Clarke, Philip; Sheffield, David; Akehurst, Sally; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015-09-22)
      The yips are a psycho-neuromuscular movement disorder, which affects sports in which fine motor precision skills are required for success. This review aims to examine key components of the yips within sport literature using a systematic approach. Twenty-five published studies were used in the systematic review, the majority of which focused on the yips in golf (n = 18); case studies were the most popular methodological approach (n = 12). Four components of the yips were identified: psychological, physiological, neurological and performance. This review describes evidence associated with each component according to research design, sample characteristics and main findings. Key findings associated with each component are evaluated and gaps within the existent literature are highlighted. It is concluded that future research incorporates a multi-discipline theory-driven approach on a wider range of sports using a more precise definition of yips types in order to enhance our understanding of the predictors and mechanisms of the yips which, in turn, will allow practitioners to develop effective interventions for athletes.
    • Zen and the art of living mindfully: The health-enhancing potential of zen aesthetics

      Lomas, Tim; Etcoff, Nancy L.; Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; University of East London; Harvard Medical School; University of Derby; Awake to Wisdom Centre for Meditation and Mindfulness Research (Springer, 2017-07-17)
      Amidst the burgeoning enthusiasm for mindfulness in the West, there is a concern that the largely secular ‘de-contextualized’ way in which it is being harnessed is denuding it of its potential to improve health and well-being. As such, efforts are underway to ‘re-contextualize’ mindfulness, explicitly drawing on the wider framework of Buddhist ideas and practices in which it was initially developed. This paper aims to contribute to this, doing so by focusing on Zen Buddhism, and in particular on Zen aesthetic principles. The article concentrates on the seven principles identified by Hisamatsu (1971) in his classic text Zen and the Fine Arts: kanso (simplicity); fukinsei (asymmetry); koko (austere sublimity); shizen (naturalness); daisuzoku (freedom from routine); sei-jaku (tranquillity); and yūgen (profound grace). The presence of these principles in works of art is seen as reflecting and communicating insights that are central to Buddhism, such as non-attachment. Moreover, these principles do not only apply to the creation and appreciation of art, but have clear applications for treating health-related issues, and improving quality of life more generally. This paper makes the case that embodying these principles in their lives can help people enhance their psychosomatic well-being, and come to a truer understanding of the essence of mindful living.