• Acceptance and identity change: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of carers’ experiences in myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome

      Catchpole, Sarah; Garip, Gulcan; University of Derby (Sage, 2019-03-21)
      Myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome is a debilitating condition and many people rely heavily on family carers. This study explored the caring experiences of seven family carers. Four themes were established: relations with others, role and identity changes, coping with change and uncertainty, and information and support seeking. Caring disrupted multiple areas of carers’ lives, including their identities and relationships. Scepticism from others about myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome was particularly distressing. Acceptance was important for coping and helped some carers achieve positive growth within spousal relationships. Improving support and advice for carers and acknowledging their caring burden could improve their well-being.
    • Adolescent problem gambling requires community-level health promotion approaches

      Sapthiang, S.; Shonin, E.; Griffiths, M.D.; Van Gordon, William; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2019-04-04)
    • Alcohol use disorder and the sibling relationship: A phenomenological enquiry

      Rhodes, Christine; Walden University (Walden University, 2015-06-15)
      Previous researchers have indicated that alcohol use disorder affects relationships between family members. Exposure to parental alcohol use disorder disrupts important relationship skill-building development between the children of the family, and may impact conflict resolution in later life relationships. The sibling relationship provides a learning opportunity on how to manage conflict, yet little is known about the effects of parental alcohol use disorder on the sibling-to-sibling relationship from the perspective of adult siblings. The purpose of this descriptive phenomenological enquiry was to explore the lived experiences of adult siblings who experienced parental alcohol use disorder in their family of origin. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 8 sibling pairs who grew up in the same isolated, remote, and densely populated community, each of whom experienced parental alcohol use disorder. Initial participants were recruited during open 12 Step meetings with subsequent siblings recruited using a snowballing technique. Sixteen audio taped interviews were manually transcribed and then coded for themes using a typology classification system based on key terms, word repetitions, and metaphors. The alcoholic family system was found to be traumatic and abusive, resulting in maladaptive coping behaviors, especially in the area of conflict. Findings also highlighted the strength of the sibling bond in the face of adversity and the opportunity for resilience under challenging circumstances. This study contributes to social change by informing the design of targeted interventions for siblings, specifically, by suggesting a change from the current focus on the identified client to a more holistic approach to treatment.
    • The applications of neuro-linguistic programming in organizational settings: A systematic review of psychological outcomes.

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Sheffield, David; Van Gordon, William; University of Derby; Centre for Psychological Research; University of Derby; Derby UK; Centre for Psychological Research; University of Derby; Derby UK; Centre for Psychological Research; University of Derby; Derby UK (Wiley, 2018-11-15)
      Neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) is an approach to communication and personal development focusing on how individuals organize their thinking, feelings, and language. While a growing number of academic articles highlight the application of NLP in organizational settings, a systematic review synthesizing and evaluating the quality of this evidence has not been conducted to date. The aim of this article was to follow the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta‐analysis (PRISMA) guidelines and conduct a systematic review of empirical studies evaluating the application of NLP in organizational settings. Targeted outcomes included self‐esteem, trustworthiness, organizational commitment, and occupational stress. Academic research databases used to identify articles included ProQuest, PsycINFO, Science Direct, Google Scholar, and a specific NLP database. The literature search yielded 952 titles from which seven studies met all of the inclusion criteria. Findings indicate that NLP can be effective for improving a wide range of work‐related psychological outcomes including self‐esteem and occupational stress. However, there were concerns regarding methodological rigor. In general, the benefits of NLP were both overpromised and undersupported. Implications for future NLP application and research, with a focus on the relevance to current issues in the field of human resource (HR) development, are discussed.
    • Are there adverse effects associated with mindfulness?

      Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; University of Derby; Awake to Wisdom Centre for Meditation and Mindfulness Research; University of Zaragoza (Sage, 2017-07-01)
    • Assessment of strengths on youths court-referred to residential treatment

      Pagano, Maria; Krentzman, Amy R.; Rhodes, Christine; Case Western Reserve University; University of Minnesota; University of Derby (2017-06-24)
    • Attachment-based compassion therapy for ameliorating fibromyalgia: mediating role of mindfulness and self-compassion

      Montero-Marin, Jesus; Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; Navarro-Gil, Mayte; Gasión, Virginia; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Luciano, Juan V.; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; University of Oxford; University of Derby; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-01-10)
      The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Attachment-Based Compassion Therapy (ABCT)—a standardised programme that includes practices to improve compassionate awareness with the aim of addressing maladaptive attachment—for improving mindfulness and self-compassion in fibromyalgia (FM) patients, and to determine whether gains in mindfulness and self-compassion mediate improvements in FM functional status together with comorbid anxiety and depression. The study comprised a randomised controlled trial of individuals undergoing ABCT, with a Relaxation condition as an active control group. Baseline, post-test, and 3-month follow-up assessments were included. Participants (n = 42) were FM patients randomly assigned to ABCT or relaxation. Outcomes were functional status (FIQ), anxiety (HADS-A), depression (HADS-D), mindfulness (FFMQ), and self-compassion (SCS). Differences between groups were estimated using mixed-effects regression models, and mediation analyses were conducted using path analyses. Compared with the Relaxation condition, the ABCT group was more effective for improving mindfulness and self-compassion, as it observed through changes in the FFMQ and SCS subscales. Effect sizes were in the moderately large to large range (Cohen’s d between 0.60–2.20). Reductions in FM functional status were not mediated by either mindfulness or self-compassion. However, the self-compassion facet of common humanity was a mediator for reductions in both anxiety (B = − 2.04; bootstrapped 95% CI = − 4.44, − 0.04) and depression (B = − 2.12; bootstrapped 95% CI = − 4.40, − 0.45). The improvement of common humanity via ABCT might be an active component for the reduction of comorbid anxiety and depression in FM patients.
    • Attributes of effective interprofessional placement facilitation

      Nicol, Paul; Forman, Dawn; University of Derby (Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing Press, 2014-10)
      Background: The quality of facilitation is an important influence on the efficacy of interprofessional education (IPE) delivery. The research objective was to increase understanding of the attributes of effective facilitation of students during external IPE placements in primary care situations. Methods and Findings: A thematic analysis of the experiences of academics, students, and placement-site staff at three placement sites was employed to explore participants’ perceptions of the attributes of effective IPE facilitators. These attributes included experience in an interprofessional context, together with an understanding of the specific clinical and assessment requirements of different disciplines. Facilitators also needed empathy with respect to the requirements of the external IPE placement sites and the ability to liaise between student and site needs. Conclusions: Models of IPE placement facilitation were most effective when, while following general principles, facilitators tailored them specifically for the individual situations of the placement sites and the learning requirements of particular groups of students. The most rewarding IPE learning experiences occurred when IPE facilitators provided sufficient clinical opportunities for students to work collaboratively with individual clients, provided the students perceived that their participation was relevant to their own discipline.
    • Attributes of effective interprofessional placement facilitation

      Nicol, Paul; Forman, Dawn; Universty of Derby (Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing Press, 2014-10)
      Background: The quality of facilitation is an important influence on the efficacy of interprofessional education (IPE) delivery. The research objective was to increase understanding of the attributes of effective facilitation of students during external IPE placements in primary care situations. Methods and Findings: A thematic analysis of the experiences of academics, students, and placement-site staff at three placement sites was employed to explore participants’ perceptions of the attributes of effective IPE facilitators. These attributes included experience in an interprofessional context, together with an understanding of the specific clinical and assessment requirements of different disciplines. Facilitators also needed empathy with respect to the requirements of the external IPE placement sites and the ability to liaise between student and site needs. Conclusions: Models of IPE placement facilitation were most effective when, while following general principles, facilitators tailored them specifically for the individual situations of the placement sites and the learning requirements of particular groups of students. The most rewarding IPE learning experiences occurred when IPE facilitators provided sufficient clinical opportunities for students to work collaboratively with individual clients, provided the students perceived that their participation was relevant to their own discipline.
    • A behavioral modeling approach to bicycle level of service

      Griswold, Julia B.; Grembek, Offer; Yu, Mengqiao; Filingeri, Victoria; Walker, Joan L.; Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley, 2614 Dwight Way, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 116 McLaughlin Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States; University of Derby Online Learning, Enterprise Centre, Bridge Street, Derby DE1 3LD, United Kingdom; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 111 McLaughlin Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States (Elsevier, 2018-06-22)
      Bicycle level of service (LOS) measures are essential tools for transportation agencies to monitor and prioritize improvements to infrastructure for cyclists. While it is apparent that different types of cyclists have varying preferences for the facilities on which they ride, in current research and practice, measures are used that are either insufficiently quantitative and empirical or lack cyclist segmentation. In this study, we conducted a detailed survey on cyclist habits, preferences, and user experience, capturing responses to videos of a bicycle traveling on road segments in the San Francisco Bay Area. The survey provided rich behavioral data, which invited both quantitative and qualitative exploration. We compared facility preferences from the survey to scores from two common measures, NCHRP bicycle level of service (NCHRP BLOS), and level of traffic stress (LTS); and we examined the responses to open-ended questions to gain insights about heterogeneity of preferences among cyclists. Finally, we applied behavioral analysis tools as a proof of concept for a new bicycle level of service measure that accounts for the segmentation of cyclist types via a latent class choice model. Combining statistics and behavioral analysis, we can improve the quality of bicycle level of service measures to make decisions driven by empirically measured cyclist preferences.
    • Borderline personality disorder: from understanding ontological addiction to psychotherapeutic revolution

      Ducasse, Déborah; Van Gordon, William; Brand-Arpon, Véronique; Courtet, Philippe; Olié, Emilie; University of Derby; CHU Montpellier, Lapeyronie Hospital, France; INSERM U1061, Neuropsychiatry: Epidemiological and Clinical Research Montpellier France (Springer, 2019-06-04)
      Bypassing a reductionist view of existing diagnostic categories, ontological addiction theory (OAT) is a new psychological model of human functioning. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), defined as “a pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image and affects, and marked impulsivity”, is not only common (up to 20% of psychiatric inpatients), but also strongly associated with suicide attempts and death by suicide. Therefore, BPD constitutes a major public health concern. As a consequence of an underlying condition of ontological addiction, self-harming behaviors can be conceptualized as addictions, suicidal acts reflecting an experiential avoidance strategy against unbearable psychological pain. The present paper aims at: (1) understanding BPD daily life experiences from the perspective of OAT; (2) offering psychotherapeutic perspectives for this mental disorder. The diagnostic category of BDP may be understood as a simple label reflecting several extreme types of manifestations resulting from the Self-grasping ignorance that underpins ontological addiction. Therefore, development of psychotherapeutic interventions targeting ontological addiction appears to be a promising future direction.
    • A brain-based pain facilitation mechanism contributes to painful diabetic polyneuropathy.

      Segerdahl, Andrew R.; Themistocleous, Andreas C.; Fido, Dean; Bennett, David L.; Tracey, Irene; University of Oxford; Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, FMRIB, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, FMRIB, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; et al. (Oxford Academic, 2018-01-15)
      The descending pain modulatory system represents one of the oldest and most fundamentally important neurophysiological mechanisms relevant to pain. Extensive work in animals and humans has shown how a functional imbalance between the facilitatory and inhibitory components is linked to exacerbation and maintenance of persistent pain states. Forward translation of these findings into clinical populations is needed to verify the relevance of this imbalance. Diabetic polyneuropathy is one of the most common causes of chronic neuropathic pain; however, the reason why ∼25–30% of patients with diabetes develop pain is not known. The current study used a multimodal clinical neuroimaging approach to interrogate whether the sensory phenotype of painful diabetic polyneuropathy involves altered function of the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey—a key node of the descending pain modulatory system. We found that ventrolateral periaqueductal grey functional connectivity is altered in patients suffering from painful diabetic polyneuropathy; the magnitude of which is correlated to their spontaneous and allodynic pain as well as the magnitude of the cortical response elicited by an experimental tonic heat paradigm. We posit that ventrolateral periaqueductal grey-mediated descending pain modulatory system dysfunction may reflect a brain-based pain facilitation mechanism contributing to painful diabetic polyneuropathy.
    • Brief report: self-compassion, physical health and the mediating role of health-promoting behaviours

      Dunne, Sara; Sheffield, David; Chilcot, Joseph; University of Derby (2016-04-26)
      To test the hypothesis that self-compassion predicts better physical health and that this is partially mediated through health-promoting behaviours, 147 adults completed self-report measures of self-compassion, health-promoting behaviours and physical health. Self-compassion and health-promoting behaviours were negatively associated with physical symptom scores. Self-compassion was positively associated with health-promoting behaviours. A bootstrapped mediation model confirmed a significant direct effect of self-compassion on physical health through health-promoting behaviours (R(2) = 0.13, b = -8.98, p = 0.015), which was partially mediated through health-promoting behaviours (R(2) = 0.06, b = -3.16, 95 per cent confidence interval [-6.78, -0.86]). Findings underscore the potential health-promoting benefits of self-compassion.
    • Call for papers: case studies of applied health psychology practice, implementation and knowledge translation experiences

      Cross, Ainslea; University of Derby (British Psychological Society, 2020-03-01)
      Since our Spring 2019 call for papers (Cross & Sheffield, 2019) for the new Health Psychology Practice, Consultancy and Training section of Health Psychology Update (HPU) we have been fortunate to receive articles highlighting the value and impact of health psychology in practice within varied settings and contexts. We have featured practice articles on working as a health psychologist in community settings for adults with learning disabilities (Bains & Turnbull, 2019), public health (Lawes-Wickwar & Begum, 2020), the NHS (Anderson 2019) and the development of a student-delivered University health coaching service (Cooper, Allan, Dunsmore, Johnston & Leighton-Beck, 2020). To build on our progress in raising the profile of applied health psychology practice, we would like to invite articles on the following themes: (1) knowledge translation, featuring experiences of translating research into practice; (2) implementation, experiences of designing and delivering applied health psychology practice or interventions. We invite a range of flexible formats for presenting your work such as reflective accounts, case study reports or protocols of works in progress and lessons learned to date. HPU aims to provide an opportunity for anyone working in applied health psychology to share their work and projects in order to raise the profile of health psychology. If you would like to share your work with the health psychology community, please email your expression of interest to: hpu.professional@outlook.com and hpu.editor@outlook.com.
    • Can mindfulness help address the global obesity epidemic in children and adolescents?

      Sapthaing, Supakyada; Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; Zangeneh, Masood; University of Derby (British Psychological Society, 2020-02-05)
    • Care of the person with dementia : interprofessional practice and education

      Forman, Dawn; Pond, Dimity; University of Derby; Newcastle University Australia (Cambridge University Press, 2015-11)
      Care of the Person with Dementia responds to the urgent need for health practitioners to take an innovative approach to the challenge of dementia. The first Australian text of its kind, it combines evidence-based resources with interprofessional education and practice, exploring the ethical, social and environmental repercussions of dementia to provide a comprehensive overview of dementia care in an Australian context. The text is structured around a model of interprofessional education and practice (IPE) tailored to dementia care. This model incorporates the context of care, an important element missing from other recognised models of IPE. Throughout the book, principles of IPE are explained within the context of dementia, drawing on exemplars from a body of current, well-researched and evaluated dementia practice. Written by experienced academics, and providing national and international perspectives, this is a unique and crucial resource to develop collaborative skills and professional knowledge in the management of dementia.
    • Caregiving in multiple sclerosis and quality of life: A meta-synthesis of qualitative research.

      Topcu, Gogem; Buchanan, Heather; Aubeeluck, Aimee; Garip, Gulcan; University of Nottingham; Eastern Mediterranean University (Taylor and Francis, 2016-02-09)
      OBJECTIVE: The lack of adequate conceptualisation and operationalisation of quality of life (QoL) limits the ability to have a consistent body of evidence to improve QoL research and practice in informal caregiving for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thus, we conducted a meta-synthesis of qualitative research to improve the conceptual understanding of the experiences of MS carers and to identify factors that affect carers' QoL. DESIGN: Systematic searches of five electronic databases yielded 17 qualitative studies which were synthesised using the principles of meta-ethnography. RESULTS: The synthesis resulted in nine inter-linking themes: Changes and losses; challenges revolving around MS; caregiving demands; burden of care; future concerns; external stressors; experiences of support; strategies used in managing the caregiving role; and motivating factors. Our findings suggest that MS carers can have both positive and negative experiences which may bring challenges and rewards to the carers. CONCLUSION: We present a proposed QoL model for MS caregiving which can be used to inform the development of interventions for MS carers to improve their QoL. However, further empirical research is needed to examine the utility of this model and to explore the concept of QoL in MS carers in more detail.
    • A case report of cognitive behavioural therapy for a Japanese female patient suffering from migraine

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Asano, Kenichi; University of Derby (Concurrent Disorders, 2020-04)
      Despite its prevalence, migraine was not regarded as a problematic disease until 2000. This third most common disease in the world is also common in Japan. While effective treatment and interventions are introduced in manuals and guidelines in the West, helpful information to treat migraine targeting Japanese patients is still scarce. Accordingly, this clinical note reports a Japanese female who suffered from long-term migraine. Similar to many Western cases, approaches based on cognitive behavioural therapy were deemed effective in this client’s case as well. Empirical evaluation was recommended.
    • Children’s well-being and nature connectedness: Exploring the impact of a ‘3-good-things’ writing task on nature connectedness and well-being.

      Harvey, Caroline; Sheffield, David; Richardson, Miles; University of Derby (2016-09-10)
      The health benefits of being connected to nature are well documented amongst both adults and children therefore simple interventions that lead to greater connectedness are valuable. The ‘3-good-things’ writing task is a positive psychology intervention which has been shown to increase happiness and decrease depression. Focusing the 3-good-things writing tasks on nature related good things has been found to increase nature connection in a sample of adults and the present research extends this to explore the impact of the intervention on nature connectedness in children. Children (n= 167) aged 9-11 completed measures of nature connection, mindfulness and life satisfaction at three time points, before and after the intervention, and again approximately eight weeks later. The intervention consisted of writing 3 good things about nature that they noticed every day for 5 days, whilst the control group wrote about 3 things they had noticed. Data will be analysed using factorial mixed design analysis. Relationships between the dependent variables will be explored using multiple regression.
    • Co-constructed dyadic illness experience in the discourse of couples living with severe uncontrolled asthma

      Varkonyi-Sep, Judit; Cross, Ainslea; Howarth, Peter; University of Southampton; University of Derby (European Psychology Society, 2016-08-23)
      Abstract Background: The research aims to explore dyadic constructed illness experiences and identities in couples living with severe uncontrolled asthma (SUA) Methods: Following NHS ethical approval, three couples, where one partner was being treated for SUA, were recruited from an asthma clinic. Each couple took part in a dyadic semi-structured, face-to-face interview. Mean duration since disease onset was 34 years (range 24-49). Patients' mean age was 66 years (range 59-73). Data were analysed using discourse analysis. Expected results: Preliminary results show that couples' dyadically constructed identities are fluid identities that adapt to variable illness severity over the disease course. Couples' dyadically constructed 'coping scripts' emerged from the non-asthmatic partner's expectations for coping strategies. Couples articulated unresolved emotional burden from old illness-related memories around acceptance of condition or traumatic encounters with health services. They highlighted lack of professional psychological support in coping with the illness. Participants perceived unique relationship and rapport with specific physicians. Despite physical suffering and life constrains, couples reported a good quality of life that they actively constructed. Current stage of work: A further 7-10 couples are being recruited to explore the preliminary findings further. Discussion: Exploring co-constructed illness experiences of SUA with dyadic approach provides valuable data on the significant other's influences and the impact of illness on the couple as a unit. Joint dyadic interviewing is useful in exploring the co-construction of illness experience in discourse, potentially applicable to areas of chronic disease management and health behaviour change. Refbacks There are currently no refbacks. Copyright (c) 2016 J. Varkonyi-Sepp, A. Cross, P. Howarth Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.