• Borderline personality disorder: from understanding ontological addiction to psychotherapeutic revolution

      Ducasse, Déborah; Van Gordon, William; Brand-Arpon, Véronique; Courtet, Philippe; Olié, Emilie; University of Derby; CHU Montpellier, Lapeyronie Hospital, France; INSERM U1061, Neuropsychiatry: Epidemiological and Clinical Research Montpellier France (Springer, 2019-06-04)
      Bypassing a reductionist view of existing diagnostic categories, ontological addiction theory (OAT) is a new psychological model of human functioning. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), defined as “a pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image and affects, and marked impulsivity”, is not only common (up to 20% of psychiatric inpatients), but also strongly associated with suicide attempts and death by suicide. Therefore, BPD constitutes a major public health concern. As a consequence of an underlying condition of ontological addiction, self-harming behaviors can be conceptualized as addictions, suicidal acts reflecting an experiential avoidance strategy against unbearable psychological pain. The present paper aims at: (1) understanding BPD daily life experiences from the perspective of OAT; (2) offering psychotherapeutic perspectives for this mental disorder. The diagnostic category of BDP may be understood as a simple label reflecting several extreme types of manifestations resulting from the Self-grasping ignorance that underpins ontological addiction. Therefore, development of psychotherapeutic interventions targeting ontological addiction appears to be a promising future direction.
    • Changes in the spatial distribution of COVID-19 incidence in Italy using GIS-based maps

      Martellucci, Cecilia Acuti; Sah, Ranjit; Rabaan, Ali A.; Dhama, Kuldeep; Casalone, Cristina; Arteaga-Livias, Kovy; Sawano, Toyoaki; Ozaki, Akihiko; Bhandari, Divya; Higuchi, Asaka; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-07-18)
      Massive spreading of the pandemic Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in different continents [1, 2], have been observed. Analyses mostly focused on the number of cases per country and administrative levels, multiple times without considering the relevance of the incidence rates. These help to see the concentration of disease among the population in terms of cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Even more using geographical information systems (GIS)-based maps stakeholder may rapidly analyze changes in the epidemiological situation [3, 4]. Although the epidemic of COVID-19 caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) started in Italy on January 31, 2020, no reports on the use of GIS-based maps have been published to analyze the distinct differences in incidence rates across its regions and provinces during the last months. For these reasons, we have developed epidemiological maps of incidence rates using official populations, by regions and provinces, for COVID-19 in Italy using GIS.
    • An Investigation of the Learning Motivation of Student Studying Accounting Courses in China

      Ho, Miu Hing; Fido, Dean; Simonovic, Boban; Beijing Institute of Technology, Zhuhai, China; University of Derby (EJournal Publishing, 2021-09)
      Since the 1980s, concerns within the accounting profession have asked whether the accounting curriculum aligns with evolving accounting practice and the preparation of students for working in accounting field. In recent years, the accountancy profession has played a vital role in the growth of China’s economy, and so identifying the motivation of college students to study accounting in China and their inclination to enter the accounting profession is paramount. This paper investigates the learning motivation of students studying accounting in China through the use of self-administered questionnaires. Non-probability sampling technique was used in this study. A total of 103 questionnaire responses were collected and underwent descriptive and correlation analysis. Findings indicated that undergraduate accounting students were mainly motivated by their concerns about their future career and qualification, altruism, enjoy social life, and self-exploration. These findings are consistent with the self-determined theory about self-identity as an accounting professional, and support the expectancy-value theory in the value of studying accounting to the career aspiration, and concurs with the achievement goal theory in achieving the professional qualifications and personal growth. Findings from this study have implications for helping students to understand their motivations to study accounting and their suitability of entering the accounting profession. Accounting professional bodies may also use the findings reported here to inform on member recruitment strategies, whilst facilitating education providers’ assessment of suitability for candidates to studying accounting and the design of curriculum and teaching strategies.
    • Mindful parenting: future directions and challenges

      Cowling, Carly; Van Gordon, William; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-08-20)
      Mindful parenting teaches parents to focus awareness on their thoughts, feelings and behaviours, as well as pay attention to their children in an intentional, present-centered and non-judgmental manner. Mindfulness appears to improve the quality of parenting and the parent–child relationship, as well as enhance children’s and parents' levels of resilience and psychological functioning. However, an understanding of the processes and techniques underpinning effective mindful parenting remains constrained due to methodological limitations. These limitations include an over reliance on non-experimental designs, uncontrolled studies, self-report assessments, small sample sizes mostly comprising mothers, and uncertainty with regards to the definitions and meanings of certain concepts and protocols for mindful parenting interventions. In order to examine the effectiveness of mindful parenting interventions, standards need to be established which define the meaning of mindful parenting and identify the correlates, determinants and mechanisms of change in mindful parenting over time, in order to determine modifiable factors so that interventions can be appropriately targeted to vulnerable populations. This paper discusses some of the latest research developments in mindful parenting, provides recommendations for effective mindfulness practice from a parenting context and discusses key future challenges affecting this area of mindfulness research and practice.
    • A spotlight on acceptance and commitment therapy

      Ducasse, Déborah; Van Gordon, William; Courtet, Philippe; University of Derby (Edizioni Minerva Medica, 2021-09-28)
      There is increasing scientific interest into third-wave cognitive behavioral therapies, which include a range of interventions advocating awareness of both oneself and the present moment. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is one such third-wave therapeutic modality, which employs a “self as context” framework. ACT aims at changing the relationship to one’s sensorial and automatic psychological events, leading to decreased experiential avoidance. However, there is a lack of awareness as to the range of health conditions for which empirical findings appear to support the therapeutic delivery of ACT. There also exists some confusion in terms of the key Eastern contemplative principles that underlie the conceptual and therapeutic framework of ACT. Consequently, the present paper briefly outlines the key conceptual and therapeutic principles that ACT embodies, provides a high-level map of current directions in ACT treatment research, and discusses challenges and future directions. ACT appears to be an effective treatment for a range of psychological and somatic disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and chronic pain. However, further studies using randomized controlled trial designs are required to better understand the other health conditions for which ACT is likely to be an effective treatment. Furthermore, there is a need for greater understanding as to the most appropriate means by which ancient contemplative principles should be integrated into ACT approaches, as well as other therapeutic modalities likely to be compatible with the ACT approach.