• Forget cancer, let's MOVE: a behaviour change support model for physical activity for young people during and after cancer

      Cross, Ainslea; Sheffield, David; Elander, James; University of Derby (British Psychological Society, 2017-09)
      Abstract: This paper describes a model of behaviour change support for a referral physical activity cancer service for young people. The service is underpinned by the self-determination (Deci & Ryan, 2008) principles of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. A range of tailored physical activity programmes are provided in community, in-patient and online settings. Each young person receives behaviour change support from motivational interviewing, which incorporates mental contrasting and implementation intentions. This paper seeks to share practice on how health psychology theory and techniques have been applied in order to support young people to be more physically active, both during and after their cancer treatment. Additionally, we share our experiences of providing consultancy to shape service development and planning.
    • Mental contrasting as a behaviour change technique: a systematic review protocol paper of effects, mediators and moderators on health

      Cross, Ainslea; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Biomed Central, 2016-11-25)
      Background Mental contrasting is a self-regulation strategy that is required for strong goal commitment. In mental contrasting, individuals firstly imagine a desired future or health goal that contrasted with the reality proceeding the goal state, which after reflection is viewed as an obstacle (Oettingen et al. J Pers Soc Psychol 80:736–753, 2001). Mentally contrasting a positive future with reality enables individuals to translate positive attitudes and high efficacy into strong goal commitment. Methods A systematic review of the literature is proposed to explore the efficacy of mental contrasting as a behaviour change technique (Michie et al., Ann Behav Med 46: 81-95, 2013) for health. The review also aims to identify the effects of mental contrasting on health-related behaviour, as well as identifying mediator and moderator variables. Discussion This will be the first systematic review of mental contrasting as a health behaviour change technique. With sufficient studies, a meta-analysis will be conducted with sensitivity and sub group analyses. If meta-analysis is not appropriate, a narrative synthesis of the reviewed studies will be conducted. Systematic review registration Review protocol registered on PROSPERO reference CRD42016034202.