• Digitally enhanced learning: Facing up to the camera.

      Blundell, Barry G.; Auckland University of Technology (Oxford Academic, 2015-05-15)
      At last the lecture room doors swing open and tenaciously guarding my cup of coffee I try to move against the great tsunami of emerging students. Immediately behind me follow two technical support staff weighed down with equipment and cables. We are well aware that the incumbent lecturer has (as usual) overrun his allotted time and so we are running late. The clock is ticking - my lecture is due to begin in seven minutes, and in terms of technology, there’s a lot of setting up to do.
    • Ethical and professional issues: Reflections on course evolution, innovation and student engagement.

      Blundell, Barry G.; Lu, Louise Weiwei; Auckland University of Technology (British Computer Society (BCS), 2015-03-31)
      At INSPIRE 2013 we outlined our efforts to develop a core first year undergraduate course entitled ‘Computing Technology in Society’. A primary course objective is to demonstrate the potential impact that ever more complex, interconnected digital systems may have on the both the individual and on society in general. This provides the backdrop against which we endeavour to foster an ethos in which students are encouraged to establish a personal ethical position in relation to the application and deployment of digital systems. Here we reflect on further progress in developing this course with particular reference to ongoing curriculum development, student evaluation and, most crucially, student engagement. Additionally, we outline developments relating to our integration of technologies into the educational experience. We draw on our experience with the CTIS course to consider broader ramifications of technology infusion, particularly in relation to increased VLE integration and the streaming/recording of lectures.
    • Introduction to 3D displays.

      Blundell, Barry G.; Fihn, Mark; Auckland University of Technology (Springer, 2016)
      “3D display technologies are evolving very rapidly particularly in respect of autostereoscopic systems which are able to be used without viewing glasses, and which provide much greater freedom in vantage position. However, significant questions still remain in relation to the perceptual mechanisms that underpin the 3D experience. Here we provide general background discussion as a precursor to other entries which review approaches in more detail.”
    • On alternative approaches to 3D image perception: Monoscopic 3D techniques.

      Blundell, Barry G.; Auckland University of Technology (Springer, 2015-04-28)
      In the eighteenth century, techniques that enabled a strong sense of 3D perception to be experienced without recourse to binocular disparities (arising from the spatial separation of the eyes) underpinned the first significant commercial sales of 3D viewing devices and associated content. However following the advent of stereoscopic techniques in the nineteenth century, 3D image depiction has become inextricably linked to binocular parallax and outside the vision science and arts communities relatively little attention has been directed towards earlier approaches. Here we introduce relevant concepts and terminology and consider a number of techniques and optical devices that enable 3D perception to be experienced on the basis of planar images rendered from a single vantage point. Subsequently we allude to possible mechanisms for non-binocular parallax based 3D perception. Particular attention is given to reviewing areas likely to be thought-provoking to those involved in 3D display development, spatial visualization, HCI, and other related areas of interdisciplinary research.
    • Volumetric 3D displays.

      Blundell, Barry G.; Auckland University of Technology (Springer, 2016)
      Volumetric displays enable electronically processed images to be depicted within a transparent volume, and so they are able to occupy three spatial dimensions. A broad range of depth cues are inherently associated with such images, including the parallax and oculomotor cues. Accommodation-convergence breakdown and depth cue conflict are avoided. Here we review aspects of this display modality, identify various key characteristics, and refer to a number of exemplar technologies. Brief consideration is given to the formation of opaque images and the implementation of an ethereal form of image space.