Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Ian*
dc.contributor.authorLennox, Peter*
dc.contributor.authorWiggins, Bruce*
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-18T12:10:02Z
dc.date.available2015-02-18T12:10:02Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-22
dc.identifier.citationMcKenzie, I., Lennox, P., Wiggins, B. "Hearing without ears.". Presented at the 20th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2014), June 22-25, 2014, New York, NY.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/344558
dc.description.abstractWe report on on-going work investigating the feasibility of using tissue conduction to evince auditory spatial perception. Early results indicate that it is possible to coherently control externalization, range, directionality (including elevation), movement and some sense of spaciousness without presenting acoustic signals to the outer ear. Signal control techniques so far have utilised discrete signal feeds, stereo and 1st order ambisonic hierarchies. Some deficiencies in frontal externalization have been observed. We conclude that, whilst the putative components of the head related transfer function are absent, empirical tests indicate that coherent equivalents are perceptually utilisable. Some implications for perceptual theory and technological implementations are discussed along with potential practical applications and future lines of enquiry.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorgia Institute of Technologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/1853/52051en
dc.subjectAuditory displayen
dc.subjectMechanical transductionen
dc.subjectTissue conductionen
dc.subjectAuditory spatial perceptionen
dc.titleHearing Without Earsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Community for Auditory Displayen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T13:38:26Z
html.description.abstractWe report on on-going work investigating the feasibility of using tissue conduction to evince auditory spatial perception. Early results indicate that it is possible to coherently control externalization, range, directionality (including elevation), movement and some sense of spaciousness without presenting acoustic signals to the outer ear. Signal control techniques so far have utilised discrete signal feeds, stereo and 1st order ambisonic hierarchies. Some deficiencies in frontal externalization have been observed. We conclude that, whilst the putative components of the head related transfer function are absent, empirical tests indicate that coherent equivalents are perceptually utilisable. Some implications for perceptual theory and technological implementations are discussed along with potential practical applications and future lines of enquiry.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
ICAD 2014 Camera Ready - HEARING ...
Size:
343.3Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Camera Ready PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record