• An Evaluation of Management Perspectives of Sustainability Reporting In The Nigerian Oil Industry.

      Uzonwanne, G; Yekini, K; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; tobo, P; Coventry University (CCSE, 2014)
      This article investigates the perspectives of managers involved in sustainability reporting in the Nigerian oil industry. The article adopts a survey methodology in its approach to conduct this investigation. The survey employed a structured interview to investigate five themes built around the motivation for sustainability reporting within these organizations, hierarchical responsibility for sustainability reporting, the organizations objectives relative to the welfare of the people within the communities it operates in, policies in place to rejuvenate the damaged environment resulting from it’s operations and finally how sufficient in monetary terms is the company’s effort to wipe out its operational footprint. The data gathered was analysed qualitatively under these various themes. The general view emerging amongst the vast majority of the managers interviewed was that oil companies operating within the region have a key social responsibility and disclosure role to play but that it remains the role of the Nigerian Federal Government to provide the institutional framework around which the development of the region is to be hinged. Research Implications: More research is required in the area of CSR and CSD in developing/emerging markets to understand the link between weak institutional frameworks and voluntary CSR and CSD. This article contributes to CSR and CSD literature in broad terms and in specific terms to the literature on sustainable operations in developing/emerging markets. The originality is based on the fact that it explores manager’s perspectives in a developing/emerging market.
    • Audit committee and audit quality: An empirical analysis considering industry expertise, legal expertise and gender diversity

      Alhababsah, Salem; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-01-20)
      The extant literature and corporate governance regulations suffer from a tight focus on audit committee (AC) financial expertise as a mean of improving the AC’s oversight role. However, there is a lack of evidence about other kinds of expertise that might be important for AC effectiveness which could contribute to the quality of financial statements. This study examines whether AC industry expertise and AC legal expertise have an impact on audit quality in a developing country (Jordan). Furthermore, mixed and inconsistent findings regarding the role played by female directors and the peculiarity of the Jordanian context creates a motive to examine the effect of AC gender diversity on audit quality. By utilizing 1,035 firm-year observations, using two proxies to capture audit quality, and employing different estimation methods, this study highlights the importance of AC industry expertise in ensuring high audit quality. AC legal expertise and AC gender diversity have no significant effect on audit quality. This study offers a valuable contribution to the literature, and also has implications for policy-makers in Jordan and other countries with similar institutional environments to consider for future regulatory reform.
    • Corporate social responsibility performance and tax aggressiveness

      Chijoke-Mgbame, M.A; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Kemi, Y.C; Mgbame, C.O; Coventry University (Academic Journals, 30/09/2017)
      This study investigated the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance on tax aggressiveness of listed firms in Nigeria. A cross-sectional research design was utilized for the study, and data were collected from the published annual reports. Using a sample of 50 companies for the period of 2007 to 2013, the findings of the study reveal that there is a negative relationship between CSR performance and tax aggressiveness in Nigeria. A significant relationship was also found between firm size and tax aggressiveness, though with mixed positive and negative results. In addition, the results reveal a negative and significant relationship between firm performance and tax aggressiveness, and the extent of tax aggressiveness is reinforcing. It can be concluded that firms are more or less likely to engage in tax aggressiveness depending on their CSR standpoints and dimension and other corporate characteristics. It is recommended that more attention should be given by tax administrations to understand conditions where tax aggressiveness is more likely and measures should be put in place to combat it.
    • Examination of information load following IFRS adoption in an emerging market: evidence from Nigeria.

      Okwuosa I; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Oyemade B; Coventry University (Sep-17)
      No abstract
    • Impact of board independence on the quality of community disclosures in annual reports.

      Yekini, K.C; Adelopo, I; Andrikopoulos, P; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University (Taylor and Francis, 27/02/2019)
      This study investigates the link between board independence and the quality of community disclosures in annual reports. Using content analysis and a panel dataset from UK FTSE 350 companies the results indicate a statistically significant relationship between board independence, as measured by the proportion of nonexecutive directors, and the quality of community disclosures, while holding constant other corporate governance and firm specific variables. The study indicates that companies with more non-executive directors are likely to disclose higher quality information on their community activities than others. This finding offers important insights to policy makers who are interested in achieving optimal board composition and furthers our understanding of the firm's interaction with its corporate and extended environment through high-quality disclosures. The originality of this paper lies in the fact that it is the first to specifically examine the relationship between outside directors and community disclosures in annual reports. The paper contributes both to the corporate governance and community disclosure literature.
    • Investigating the link between CSR and Financial Performance – Evidence from Vietnamese Listed Companies

      Ho Ngoc, T.T; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Sheffield Hallam (No idea, 2014)
      Many studies have examined different issues around CSR by using data from western countries to examine the nexus between CSR and Corporate Financial Performance (CFP). There are a few literatures about the same topic in Asian countries. The paper therefore investigates the impacts of CSR on CFP by using Vietnamese data. The paper uses content analysis to examine the nexus described above by creating four hypotheses. Apart from CFP variables, the paper controls for size and risk in the model used. We collected data from the annual reports of 20 Vietnamese companiesfor 3 years giving a total of 60 observations. We document a modest relationship between CSR and CFP among companies in Vietnam. The study also found relationship between the level of debt and CSR but document no relationship between CSR and firm size. Limitations: Content analysis with its measurement problem remains the main limitation of this work. Another limitation is the sample size of 20 companies with a total of 60 observations.The study provides some important insights for our understanding of CSR in developing economies and its effects on CFP in the context of Vietnamese companies.
    • Market reaction to the positiveness of annual report narratives

      Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr; Millo, Yuval; Coventry University (Elsevier, 2015-12-11)
      This paper focuses on narratives published by UK companies, defined here as the content of annual reports excluding financial statements and notes to accounts. We endeavour to gauge the tone of these narratives by recording the frequency of positive words appearing in the text. We show that the extent of positiveness is related to market reaction around the disclosure date. This conclusion is maintained even after controlling for the financial figures that are reported simultaneously and company-specific characteristics. Consequently, narratives should not be perceived as mere impression management tools, but also as conduits for disseminating price-sensitive information.
    • NGO accountability on environmentalism: a literature review of relevant issues and themes

      Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Yekini, Kemi, C; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing, 2021-01-04)
      This chapter, which is in themes, starts with a survey of the rise of environmentalism for the purpose of sustainability. It then evaluates the roles of nongovernmental organisations' (NGOs') self-regulation and government regulation on the need for accountability that ensures sustainability. NGOs' accountability is a way of making sure that stakeholders' social, environmental and economic sustainability are protected and rigorously evaluated. This chapter further examines what the enduring mechanisms should be if true accountability, which leads to sustainability, will be achieved to suggest a holistic accountability that involves downward and upward accountability. In doing so, this chapter utilised the identified five mechanisms that ensure the continuity of world sustainability, which is prima-facie, the objective of funders/donors, beneficiaries/stakeholders and the NGO's loop.
    • Psychopathic traits of corporate leadership as predictors of future stock returns

      Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Omar, Ayman; Coventry University (Wiley, 2019-10-07)
      This paper examines whether it is possible to forecast one-year-ahead returns of individual companies based on the observed ‘psychopathic’ characteristics of their top management team. We find that language characteristic of psychopaths present in annual report narratives, questionable integrity, excessive risk-taking and failure to contribute to charitable undertakings tend to reduce future shareholder wealth. These findings imply that firms could benefit from incorporating psychological evaluation in their recruitment processes, especially when seeking to fill senior management posts. While the return predictability described in this paper supports the upper echelons perspective, it simultaneously challenges the notion of informationally efficient stock prices.
    • Stock market returns and the content of annual report narratives.

      Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Wisniewski, Tomasz; Coventry University; University of Leicester (Taylor & Francis, 2015-12-01)
      This paper uses the tools of computational linguistics to analyze the qualitative part of the annual reports of UK listed companies. More specifically, the frequency of words associated with different language indicators is measured and used to forecast future stock returns. We find that two of these indicators, capturing ‘activity’ and ‘realism’, predict subsequent price increases, even after controlling for a wide range of factors. Elevated values of these two linguistic variables, however, are not symptomatic of exacerbated risk. Consequently, investors are advised to peruse the annual report narratives, as they contains valuable information that may still not have been discounted in the prices.
    • The determinants of CEO turnover: evidence from French listed companies

      Boussaada, R; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Makhlouf, M; Coventry University (CAIRN.INFO, 2018)
      We investigate the effect of corporate performance, ownership structure and other governance mechanisms on CEO turnover. Based on data from 153 French listed firms between 2003 and 2012, we use logit estimation technique. Consistent with previous studies, we show that the fall of financial performance increases drastically the CEO turnover probability. In addition, we find differentiated direct and moderating effects, depending on the type of broad shareholder involvement. However, the CEO does not influence the likelihood of CEO turnover
    • The impact of mergers and acquisitions on shareholders’ wealth: evidence from Nigeria

      Abeleje, R; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University (Scottish Group, 2014)
      This research paper seeks to validate the controversial post-merger synergy in Nigerian context. According to theory, mergers and acquisition should enhance synergistic effect to the advantage of the shareholders. This paper evaluates whether post-acquisition value attributable to shareholders of Nigerian banks surpasses that of the pre-acquisition period. The paper uses a fifteen year secondary data of five judgementally selected banks to analyse and compare pre-acquisition and post-acquisition shareholders‟ value in a balanced manner. The measurement index of shareholders' wealth is a modified version of the ROE (Return on Equity). SPSS version 20 and Excel spread sheet was also used to get the R, R2 ,T-test and F-test. It was discovered that shareholders' fund strongly influenced the profitability of the Nigerian banks but value to shareholders in the post-acquisition period is lower compared to the pre-acquisition period. Managers of Nigerian banks should not rest on the oars of government initiatives. They should be proactive in their operation as far as profitability is concerned. This research is the first of its kind to make a balanced and up to date comparison of pre-and post M&A period (ie 7yrs pre-merger & 7yrs post-merger). The index of measurement is modified ROE that incorporates only what relate directly to shareholders alone.