• Location independent working in academia: Enabling employees or supporting managerial control?

      Lee, Amanda; Di Domenico, Marialaura; Saunders, Mark N. K.; Coventry University; The Open University; University of Surrey (Baywood Press, 2014-10)
      In this article, we consider the extent to which the practice of location independent working (LIW) enables academic employees to make choices and have agency in their life-work balance, and the extent to which it may support (or potentially be used as a form of resistance to) increased managerial control. Set within the context of an increasingly performanceled, managerialist public sector landscape, the impact and implications of these working practices are examined through the lens of labour process theory. Drawing on findings from an ongoing in-depth ethnographic study set in a post-1992 university business school in central England, we suggest that the practice of LIW is being used both to enable employees and to support managerial control.
    • Location independent working: An ethnographic study.

      Lee, Amanda; DiDomenico, MariaLaura; Saunders, Mark N. K.; University of Surrey; University of Birmingham (2017-09-05)
      This paper draws on the research experiences of the first author who conducted a longitudinal ethnographic research study to explore the impact of formalised location independent working (LIW) practices in a highly managerialist, post-1992 ‘new’ UK university. Findings suggest the formalisation of LIW caused a fundamental shift in the nature of the relationship between academics, managers and trades unions. This has far reaching consequences for the case study university and, potentially, for other institutions, which may be supporting similar working practices by encouraging their employees to work in spaces other than those provided by the organisation. Adopting an ethnographic research design enabled the first author to become fully embedded in the social and cultural context of the case study university, which in turn allowed access to the mundane, often hidden everyday behaviour and practices of academics.
    • Time, place, space and the academic labour process.

      Lee, Amanda; DiDomenico, MariaLaura; Saunders, Mark N. K.; University of Surrey; University of Birmingham (2017-04-10)
      Drawing on empirical findings from a longitudinal ethnographic study of a post 1992 UK university business school, we argue that structural and organisational changes taking place in the working environment have implications for the way in which time, place and space are experienced, articulated and conceptualised by academics and the organisation. Our research examined the impact of formalised location independent working (LIW) practices on the lives, relationships and identities of academics in the case study institution.