• Standing in my customer’s shoes: effects of customer-oriented perspective taking on proactive service performance

      Huo, Y.; Chen, Z.; Lam, W.; Wood, S. A.; University of Surrey; City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong; The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kon (The British Psychology Society, 2018-12-04)
      We develop a theoretical framework that delineates the process by which customer oriented perspective taking contributes to employees’ proactive service performance. Drawing from motivated information processing and proactivity perspectives, the model hypothesizes that employees’ customer-oriented perspective taking enhances their role breadth self-efficacy (RBSE), which in turn enhances proactive customer service performance and proactive complaint-handling performance. A three-wave, time-lagged study, involving 145 frontline employees and their immediate supervisors in the Chinese hospitality industry, tests the research model. The results of structural equation modelling show taking customers’ perspectives results in a high level of RBSE. This relationship grows stronger if employees exhibit a strongly proactive personality. A high level of RBSE also mediates the interactive effects of customer-oriented perspective taking and proactive personality on proactive customer service performance and proactive complaint-handling performance. These findings provide insights for research on perspective taking, RBSE, and proactive service performance.
    • When do frontline hospitality employees take charge? Prosocial motivation, taking charge, and job performance: the moderating role of job autonomy

      Cai, Z.; Huo, Y.; Lan, J.; Chen, Z.; Lam, W.; City University of Hong Kong; University of Surrey; Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong, PR China; City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, PR China; The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, PR China (SAGE, 2018-09-04)
      This study draws on trait activation theory to examine the effects of frontline hospitality employees’ prosocial motivation on their taking charge and job performance and how job autonomy moderates these effects. We collected data in two stages from 185 pairs of frontline hospitality employees and their direct supervisors, and we found a positive relationship between employees’ prosocial motivation and their taking charge. In addition, job autonomy strengthened this positive relationship, and taking charge mediated the interactive effect of prosocial motivation and job autonomy on job performance. These results suggest that when frontline hospitality employees perceive their level of job autonomy to be high enough to activate their expression of prosocial motivation, they will be more likely to engage in taking charge, which should lead to a higher evaluation of their job performance. Theoretical and practical implications for hospitality industry were discussed at the end of the article.
    • Who is fit to serve? person–job/organization fit, emotional labor, and customer service performance

      Lam, W.; Huo, Y.; CHEN, Ziguang; Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong; University of Surrey (Wiley, 2018-11-07)
      This study investigates person–job (P–J) fit and person–organization (P–O) fit perceptions and relates these perceptions to employees' emotional labor and customer service performance. Data from a two-point, time-lagged study of 263 employees and 690 customers reveal that both P–J and P–O fit relate positively to deep acting and negatively to surface acting, in accordance with an emotional labor perspective. In addition, P–J and P–O fit are jointly associated with emotional labor, such that the positive link between P–J fit and deep acting is stronger, and the negative link between P–J fit and surface acting is weaker when P–O fit is high. Emotional labor partially mediates the interactive effects of P–J and P–O fit on service interaction quality and customer satisfaction; service interaction quality relates positively to customer satisfaction. These findings have multiple theoretical and practical implications.