• Configuration of enterprise support towards the clean growth challenge: a place-based perspective

      Baranova, Polina; Paterson, Fred; Gallotta, Bruno; University of Derby (SAGE, 2020-09-17)
      Although clean growth has been identified as one of the grand challenges of the UK Industrial Strategy, public policy paid little attention to the configuration of business support towards enhancing clean growth potential of SMEs. The dominant approach of policymakers to the design of enterprise support interventions appears to be ‘place-blind’ and downplays the challenges that SMEs face in engaging with the clean growth policy agenda. Based on a mixed methods methodology, involving a survey of 306 businesses, a range of public engagement exercises and an extensive interview schedule, the study explores SMEs engagement with the clean growth challenge and associated business support mechanisms. We conceptualise the nexus of place-policy-practice as a way of framing policymaking approach in addressing the challenge. As part of the clean growth policy implementation, business support mechanisms need to move beyond a singular focus on energy efficiency and shift towards a holistic approach to capacity building for sustainable development. Small business needs to project a district voice in the definition of place in the local industrial strategies and have access to enterprise support which is place-based, policy-informed and practice-relevant.
    • Innovation in Small & Medium Enterprises in São Paulo

      Freitas, Adriano; Riascos, Luis; Andrade, Alexandre; Faco, Julio; Gallotta, Bruno; Universidade Federal do ABC; University of Derby (International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, 2021-04)
      The Brazilian Small & Medium Enterprises (SMEs) represent over 98% of all active companies in the country in 2020. The role of innovation in processes must receive special attention, which leads us to write this article to measure the Dimensions of Innovation in companies. The Radar of Innovation was applied to support the model of the diagnostic method tool, which was established to perform data analysis with the needs of each organization. Through this methodology, analyzing the 12 Dimensions of Innovation for a sample of 20 SMEs in the manufacturing segment, in the south region of São Paulo, is used for the research fieldwork. The role was to promote recommendations and collaboration, to improve the opportunities to be replicated in other organizations with similar challenges. The contribution of this work is the Dimension Processes, since most participants had common results. They all found the need to differentiate themselves from their competitors.
    • Key skills and training needs of the D2N2 low carbon and environmental goods and services (LCEGS) sector

      Paterson, Fred; Baranova, Polina; Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Clarke, Lewis; Wond, Tracey; Lee, Amanda; Gill, Judith; Gallotta, Bruno; Eisen, Matthew; et al. (University of Derby, 2018-07)
      Low Carbon is one of eight priority business sectors identified in the D2N2 Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) Strategic Economic Plan (2014 – 2023). In January 2018, Learndirect (on behalf of the LEP) commissioned Derby Business School to research the key skills required by the Low Carbon and Environmental Goods and Services (LCEGS) sector in D2N2; map existing training provision for the sector and establish the needs of key sector supply chains. The research finds that many of the key issues and challenges for businesses that supply LCEGS identified in previous reports remain. Suggests, surprisingly, that as many as 1 in 4 firms are doing business in the sector; with 1 in 20 firms deriving more than 80% of their turnover from LCEGS. Estimates the number of LCEGS suppliers in 5 key sectors to demonstrate where skills provision could be targeted. Highlights the variety of skills needed in different sectors and some of the issues, gaps and challenges facing skills providers. Proposes that pro-environmental suppliers and innovators should be identified in each priority sector and the current and future skills needs relevant to each sector established. The report concludes that much of the business activity currently categorised as Low Carbon sector can be re-framed as pro-environmental innovation in existing traditional sectors.