Recent Submissions

  • The Impact of Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Education on Regional Development

    Bozward, David; Rogers-Draycott, Matthew; Smith, Kelly; Mave, Mokuba; Curtis, Vic; Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka Jayananda; Moon, Rob; Adams, Nigel; Royal Agricultural University; University of Birmingham; et al. (ISBE, 2021-10-29)
    The paper explores the ways in which enterprise and entrepreneurial education (EEE), delivered by HEI’s, impacts regional development. To do this we analysed several datasets from The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) focusing on the ways in which HEI start-up activity impacts indicators including GDP and employment. This highlights where further research and investment is needed to ensure a consistent regional development policy which we believe aligns with the conference's focus on connecting practitioners and policymakers to create a genuine change in regional disparities.
  • The determinants of aggregate fluctuations: The role of firm‐borrowing channels

    Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus, Piraeus, Greece; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-10-27)
    The paper examines the empirical relationship between firm-borrowing channels and aggregate fluctuations for the 100 largest US firms over 2000–2018. The motivation for this study originates from the general consensus in macroeconomics that microeconomic shocks to firms cannot generate significant aggregate fluctuations. The analysis extends Gabaix's 2011 baseline model by incorporating measures for “bank shocks” at the firm-level. In addition to supporting the granular hypothesis, the econometric results indicate that bank shocks have a weak impact on GDP fluctuations, whereas non-bank loans exert a strong impact on the same. The above findings survive certain robustness checks associated with the presence of oil and monetary shocks, as well as with the firms’ location factor.
  • Governance thresholds and the human capital–growth nexus

    Apergis, Nick; Mustafa, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad; University of Piraeus, Piraeus, Greece; University of Derby; Queen Mary University of London, UK; IQRA University, Islamabad, Pakistan (Emerald, 2021-10-20)
    The literature that explores the relationship between human capital and economic growth has produced mixed results. It highlights the puzzle on the correlations between human capital and economic growth. This study contributes to this debate by offering an explanation of the puzzling effects. Using the threshold model proposed by Kremer et al. (2013), the results document that there is a threshold effect in the human capital–growth nexus. The findings illustrate that the relationship between human capital and economic growth is weakly positive up to a certain threshold level of governance; however, the relationship turns out to be positive once the threshold level has been achieved. The mixed evidence on the human capital–growth relationship can be explained through institutional quality differences. The findings recommend that better governance is complementary to contribute to the productive use of human capital in achieving higher economic growth.
  • Circular Economy in Agri-Food Sector: Food Waste Management Perspective

    Tanveer, Umair; Ishaq, Shamaila; Gough, Andrew; University of Bristol; University of Derby; University of Northampton (Springer, 2021-09-15)
    Reducing the food waste is the greatest challenge in the present times for sustainable food management systems that have significant economic, environmental and social impact on the food supply chain. The Circular Economy (CE) paradigm advocates the concept of the closed-loop economy endorsing more responsible utilization and appropriate exploitation of resources in contrast to the open-ended linear economic system of take-make-use and dispose. This chapter has explored Agri-Food waste in the context of CE, triple bottom line (TBL), and sustainability. An alignment of circular strategies with the food waste hierarchy is proposed that indicates practical application of the gradations of circularity in the food waste management that could lead to the development of sustainable food management system targeting the sustainable development goals of Zero Hunger and Responsible consumption and production. This chapter also highlights some opportunities and challenges of Agri-Food waste in the application of circular bio-economy.
  • How will Blockchain Technology Transform Supply Chains? Science mapping on Blockchain Technology

    Daniel, Jay; University of Derby (Production and Operations Management Society (POMS), 2021-05)
    As most blockchain initiatives are yet at the first outset, this research explores blockchain technology in supply chain through literature survey and bibliometric review. The study reveals some interesting findings of the direction and trends of blockchain technology and emerging research themes, leading countries, key authors and new emerging topics.
  • Green Jobs and Green Skills in the East Midlands

    Paterson, Fred; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-10-15)
    This Race to Zero White Paper explores the different definitions of ‘green jobs’ and ‘green skills’ and sets out what we know about the current state of ‘green collar’ jobs in the East Midlands and how the University of Derby is supporting the shift towards a sustainable economy.
  • Japanese Martial Arts for Wellbeing During COVID-19

    Veasey, Christian; Foster Phillips, Charlotte-Fern; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis Group plc, 2021-09-16)
    The unprecedented and uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic have changed our lifestyles significantly, with lockdowns and social distancing measures in place to reduce virus transmission. These changes have likely had a negative effect on our wellbeing, and have been associated with increased stress, anxiety, and depression. During these unforeseen times, online martial arts lessons have highlighted the possibilities that martial arts offer in regard to positive wellbeing benefits such as self-awareness and self-mastery in managing and dealing with health issues. This short paper examines the potential benefits martial arts training may provide as an alternative wellbeing strategy to counter challenges associated with COVID-19.
  • The social marketing paradox: challenges and opportunities for the discipline

    Akbar, Bilal; Foote, Liz; Lawson, Alison; French, Jeff; Deshpande, Sameer; Lee, Nancy, R.; Nottingham Trent University; Antioch University New England, NH, Keene, USA; University of Derby; Strategic Social Marketing Ltd, London; et al. (Springer, 2021-08-22)
    This paper contributes to emerging discourse about the ongoing challenges and opportunities of social marketing as a discipline. The paper presents a qualitative perspective on existing challenges faced by social marketing and offers suggestions for addressing these challenges. Nine semi-structured interviews with social marketing academics and practitioners from six different countries were conducted. Thematic analysis was used to analyse and interpret the qualitative data. The study provides insight into existing challenges for social marketing, classified into three key themes according to their position within or outside of the discipline: 1) poor branding of the discipline as an internal challenge, 2) competing disciplines as an external challenge, and 3) overall reach of the discipline, seen as both an internal and external challenge. The findings suggest that social marketing needs to overcome poor branding issues to sufficiently address external challenges. We conclude by arguing for a more robust marketing of the discipline. While scholars have identified the challenges and opportunities for social marketing as a discipline, they have paid little attention to examining these challenges from the viewpoint of expert practitioners and academics. This paper presents a nuanced contextual understanding of the identified challenges through a qualitative perspective and explores how social marketing can overcome these challenges.
  • An empathetic approach: Using appreciative inquiry to gain balanced insights

    Veasey, Christian; Lawson, Alison; Hancock, Charles; University of Derby (Academy of Marketing, 2021-07-07)
    Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is described as a collaborative approach to the exploration and development of investigations with informed consideration of what is working well, as opposed to a problem-solving approach (Reed, 2010). The traditional problem-solving approach starts from the point of view that ‘xyz is not working in the abc department’ and has a potential disadvantage in that it focuses on the participants, so participants may feel as if they are under scrutiny and that the researcher is seeking someone to blame for the issue or problem (Goldberg and Commins, 2001). Moreover, this approach focuses on problems that may lead to negatively perceived outcomes, whereas concentrating on positivity, strengths, successes, achievements, positive choices, positive resources, energy and assets can lead to enhanced outcomes and the sustainability of existing strengths (Carter, 2006).
  • From KAM to KARMA: The evolution of Key Account Management for co-creation of value

    Veasey, Christian; Lawson, Alison; University of Derby (British Academy of Management, 2020-09-03)
    This study investigates Key Account Management (KAM) from a Marketing and Business-to-Business (B2B) perspective. A review of literature finds that in recent years marketing scholars have proposed that KAM has developed from its traditional roots in sales management to having a greater focus on relational aspects to co-creation of value. However, whilst the principles of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) to co-creation of value are well grounded within the marketing literature there are no theoretical models proposed for the practical application within KAM. To develop a new theoretical model for KAM by analysing the development of KAM over the past 30 years from a process driven discipline to today’s more complex arena that draws on CRM, SDL and co-creation of value. Secondary analysis of literature, analysis of KAM as a discipline, followed by analysis of definitions of KAM from the past 30 years. The emphasis of KAM has evolved into a Key Account Relationship Management Approach (KARMA), and a new theoretical model has been developed. New theoretical model proposed based on the KARMA approach.
  • Managing strategic accounts with empowerment and management support for co-creation of value

    Veasey, Christian; Lawson, Alison; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (British Academy of Management, 2021-07-16)
    This study explores managing strategic accounts for co-creation of value, and the utility of management input to account plans and empowering account managers. In recent years, managing strategic accounts (SA) has progressed towards relationship-building with customer relationship management (CRM) and use of service-dominant logic (SDL) for co-creation of value. However, there is limited data regarding managing SA with empowerment and management support for co-creation of value. Accordingly, this research aims to appraise the functions of managing SA with empowerment and management support for co-creation of value. Aligning with a pragmatic research philosophy, semi-structured interviews (n=12) were selected with mixed demographics. Participants were primarily strategic account managers (SAMs) from a variety of business sectors. Thematic analysis was conducted on the interview transcripts to arrive at key issues and themes. The findings imply that the emphasis of managing SA has progressed into a value-creating account relations management approach. Empowerment and support from senior management were felt to be important to SAMs. This study shows the importance of management support and empowerment for successful strategic account management that creates value for both customer and supplier.
  • Identifying critical success factors in Key Account Management, along with characteristics of Key Account Managers, in order to develop a new model and approach to implementation

    Veasey, Christian; University of Derby (British Academy of Management, 2016-09-07)
    This research was a developmental paper ‘Identifying critical success factors in key account management, along with characteristics of key account managers, in order to develop a new model and approach to implementation.
  • Revisiting International Public Sector Accounting Standards Adoption in Developing Countries

    Boolaky Doorgakunt, Lakshi D; Omoteso, Kamil; Mirosea, Nitri; Boolaky, Pran Krishansing; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2021-06-06)
    Based on a comprehensive review of recent studies on IPSAS adoption around the globe, we develop in this article a conceptual model to examine alternative predictors of adoption for developing countries. Drawing from this framework, we develop a rigorous econometric modelling on the impact of legal, political and accounting environments in the developing countries’ drive for IPSAS adoption. Contrary to what existing literature projects, our study reveals that a country’s IFRS and ISA experience is more important and significant drivers of IPSAS adoption compared to IFRS adoption. Likewise, political system, regulatory enforcement, lenders and borrowers’ rights and the level of corruption in a country also influence IPSAS adoption.
  • Looking at the other side of the fence: A comparative review of the mergers and acquisitions, and strategic alliances literatures

    Gomes, Emanuel; Alam, Sunbir; He, Qile; Nova School of Business and Economics, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal; Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2021-09-29)
    Over the last few decades, management has witnessed a proliferation of research on mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and strategic alliances (SAs). Although both fields have been widely studied, the relationship between the two bodies of literature has not been sufficiently explored. Despite the enormous commonality between both phenomena in terms of the drivers behind them and of the critical success factors associated with the M&A and alliance process management, scholars from the two fields have rarely exchanged findings and insights, even though they may be highly relevant to each other. M&A and SA research remain mostly separated from each other, thus minimizing the ability for more mutually beneficial complementary and synergetic knowledge sharing effects. This chapter synthesizes and compare existing theoretical perspectives from the M&A and SA literatures and identifies opportunities for future research and knowledge cross fertilization between the two fields. Building upon previous review studies about M&A and SA literatures, we develop a comparative longitudinal review of both literatures published in top management journals over a 27 year period. For that purpose, we resort to machine learning algorithms to discover thematic patterns that may have gone unnoticed by using traditional review methods. By highlighting some of the shortcomings that limit our theoretical and practical understandings, we challenge scholars from both fields (M&A and SA) to go beyond what they think they know from compartmentalized received theory, and draw upon novel and meaningful ideas, concepts, and theoretical approaches from “the other side of the fence”. We believe that such a dialog will facilitate further theoretical exploration and empirical investigation of both phenomena and produce insights that will influence the practical management of M&A and SAs.
  • A case study for merging supply chain and blockchain in Australian manufacturer

    Daniel, Jay; Maroun, E; Fynes, B; University of Derby; University of Technology Sydney; University College Dublin (POMS, 2021)
    This paper examines implementation of Blockchain technology within an Australian manufacturer supply chain. We present a summary of the challenges in adopting this technology. The adoption of Blockchain technology has potential to bring greater transparency, validity across supply chain processes, and improvement of communication between all stakeholders and customers involved.
  • Innovation in Small & Medium Enterprises in São Paulo

    Freitas, Adriano; Riascos, Luis; Andrade, Alexandre; Faco, Julio; Gallotta, Bruno; Universidade Federal do ABC; University of Derby (International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, 2021-04)
    The Brazilian Small & Medium Enterprises (SMEs) represent over 98% of all active companies in the country in 2020. The role of innovation in processes must receive special attention, which leads us to write this article to measure the Dimensions of Innovation in companies. The Radar of Innovation was applied to support the model of the diagnostic method tool, which was established to perform data analysis with the needs of each organization. Through this methodology, analyzing the 12 Dimensions of Innovation for a sample of 20 SMEs in the manufacturing segment, in the south region of São Paulo, is used for the research fieldwork. The role was to promote recommendations and collaboration, to improve the opportunities to be replicated in other organizations with similar challenges. The contribution of this work is the Dimension Processes, since most participants had common results. They all found the need to differentiate themselves from their competitors.
  • Social Marketing: Advancing a New Planning Framework to Guide Programmes

    Akbar, M Bilal; Ndupu, Lawrence; French, Jeff; Lawson, Alison; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby; Strategic Social Marketing Ltd, London (Emerald, 2021-05-31)
    This paper develops and presents a new planning framework of social marketing, known as CSD-IES (Consumer Research, Segmentation, Design of the Social Programme, Implementation, Evaluation and Sustainability). The proposed framework is based on recent theoretical developments in social marketing and is informed by the key strengths of existing social marketing planning approaches. The CSD-IES planning framework incorporates emerging principles of social marketing. For example, sustainability in changed behaviour, ethical considerations in designing social marketing programmes, the need for continuous research to understand the changing needs of the priority audience during the programme, and the need for explicit feedback mechanisms. Research Implications – The CSD-IES framework is a dynamic and flexible framework that guides social marketers, other practitioners, and researchers to develop, implement, and evaluate effective and sustainable social marketing programmes to influence or change specific behaviours based on available resources. This paper makes an important contribution to social marketing theory and practice by integrating elements of behaviour maintenance, consideration of ethical perspectives and continuous feedback mechanisms in developing the CSD-IES framework, bringing it in line with the global consensus definition of social marketing.
  • Access to Finance for Cleantech Innovation and Investment: Evidence from U.K. Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Cowling, Marc; Weixi, Liu; University of Derby; University of Bath (IEEE, 2021-05-03)
    Clean technology (cleantech) is becoming increasingly important as firms and industries seek to address challenges around the global scarcity of resources and also achieve wider social and environmental goals. Yet there are underlying problems with how capital markets respond to this increasing demand for new and innovative cleantech investments. In this article, we use a large U.K. dataset to first consider the extent to which firms engaging with cleantech increase their demand for external capital. We then consider how different types of debt and equity financiers deal with this demand for funds. Our key findings are that: 1) businesses engaging with clean technologies have a higher demand for external capital and 2) these demands are not being fully met by traditional providers which forces firms to seek out alternative and nontraditional sources of finance.
  • Holidays and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of Indian states

    Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; Apergis, Nicholas; University of Derby; University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA (Wiley, 2021-05-01)
    The number of holidays differs significantly across Indian states. Moreover, some of the governing political parties have been accused of using holidays as a tool either to mollify disgruntled workers or to woo voters before the state elections. In this context, this paper explores the relationship between the number of holidays and economic growth across 24 Indian states, spanning the period 2008–2016, by employing a panel model analysis. The paper presents evidence suggesting that holidays seem to affect growth negatively in the rich states but are inconsequential for the growth performance of the poor states.
  • Researching entrepreneurship: an approach to develop subjective understanding

    Rajasinghe, Duminda; Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Mulholland, Gary; University of Northampton, Northampton, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK; AFG College with University of Aberdeen, Doha, Qatar (Emerald, 2021-04-29)
    Entrepreneurship is a complex social activity. Hence, knowledge production in the field requires inclusivity and diversity within research approaches and perspectives to appreciate the richness of the phenomenon. However, the dominance of positivist research in the field is visible, and the current qualitative research is also predominantly restricted to popular templates. This seems to have limited the understanding of entrepreneurship. This paper critically discusses the appropriateness of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) as an innovative qualitative research methodology that facilitates a fuller appreciation of the richness and diversity of entrepreneurship. This conceptual paper critically evaluates IPA's relevance for the stated purpose by reviewing both entrepreneurship and IPA literature. It discusses how IPA's philosophical underpinnings facilitate scholars to appreciate the wholeness of the phenomenon and provides literature informed data analysis guidance, thereby addressing some of the weaknesses of the qualitative research within the field. Critical evaluation of the literature suggests that IPA is an appropriate research methodology for entrepreneurship. It has the potential to address some interesting and timely questions to elaborate, deepen and qualify existing theory or to study relatively unexplored areas within the field. The laid-out guidance helps scholars to develop informed rationale for their research decisions and to ensure quality and rigour in qualitative research. This paper promotes the analysis of how people make sense of their experience as a valid way of knowing. IPA has a unique identity as it incorporates phenomenology, hermeneutics and idiography as a way to explore first-hand human experience to uncover qualitative understanding of entrepreneurship. The clear guidance and justifications in the paper promote scholarly confidence and address some preconceptions related to rigour, quality and validity of qualitative studies. Incorporating IPA into entrepreneurship, the paper also contributes to the demand for diversity, inclusivity and pluralism in qualitative research perspectives and approaches.

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