• The stakeholder sandwich - a new stakeholder analysis model for events and festivals

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Wallace, Kevin; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019)
      The significance of stakeholders in the festival and events sector is demonstrated in the literature and is a growing area of interest. The application of conventional stakeholder theory to this sector has proved to be problematic and new models developed as alternatives. Since the 1980s a number of matrices and models have been established to identify and categorise stakeholders, but limitations have been exposed in the context of festival and events research. This study set out to explore the use of established stakeholder models for their usefulness and effectiveness in the sector, consider alternative models and to empirically examine a proposed alternative. To do so, a multi-phased qualitative methodology was used. Results indicated that none of the conventional or proposed sector specific models were in common usage by sector professionals but did confirm that Ed Freeman’s founding stakeholder definition of 1984 continues to be valid and hold true. The framework for a new conceptual test model was developed and then refined to produce the Stakeholder Sandwich Model for testing on a live event. This model proved to be effective in identifying and mapping a wide range of stakeholders with flexibility and fluidity, overcoming the limitations of both established conventional models and more recent sector-specific typographies. This model has significant potential for application in the festival and events sector, with implications for both researchers and event practitioners.
    • Challenges in managing peripheral workers within diverse environments.

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Melpignano, Claudia; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019)
      This paper explores the HR issues that tour operators experience in the planning, coordination and management of tours revolving around cycling events. It does so by using a tour operator based in the UK as a case study and by deploying a qualitative ethnographic approach. This methodology was deemed as the most fitting to enable an in-depth and rich analysis of the issues that characterise the complex management of core (office-based employees) and peripheral workers (tour guides on the event site). Not only do the different operations, time frames, environments and activities within which the employees operate result in the company’s workforce division into two distinctive groups, but they also determine low levels of professional satisfaction and motivation among the tour guides. Investigating the stances held by the company’s employees in relation to the difficulties encountered in the workplace is necessary to develop a strategy that allows for retaining peripheral workers, for creating synergy between the two different teams, and consequently for ensuring the achievement of the organization’s goals and objectives. The findings highlight how the adoption of HR practices that aim at enhancing the company’s internal marketing would entail an optimistic shift in the tour guides’ perception of their position within the company, resulting in improved product delivery and reduced absenteeism, burnout and turnover challenges
    • Taking crime seriously: Playing the weighting game

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Oxford Academic, 2015-09-18)
      The advantages and problems of weighting crime counts by harm inflicted are detailed. To obtain a better understanding of crime trends and distributions, victim judgements of the seriousness of offences committed against them derived from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) were analysed and used as weights of crime counts. The data were used to check whether there was a seriousness drop paralleling the crime drop of recent decades. There was, albeit somewhat less precipitous. Series crimes (i.e. repeated crimes against the same targets and presumed to be by the same perpetrators) account for an astonishing 39% of all crime and around 42% of crime weighted by seriousness. The article focuses on distributions across households. In line with our earlier work on crime events per se, the most victimized households have benefited most from the seriousness ‘drop’ in absolute terms, but still account for a similar proportion of total harm over time. A case is made for the use of CSEW victim seriousness judgement for a variety of analytic and practical purposes.
    • Police overestimation of criminal career homogeneity

      Pease, Ken; Roach, Jason; University of Derby (Wiley, 2013-10-07)
      Police presumptions about criminal career trajectories have been little studied. The exploratory study reported here involved 42 police staff of varying rank and experience. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire that asked them to predict the type of offence that an individual with a specified prior record would most probably commit next. Participating police personnel substantially overstated the homogeneity of criminal careers, that is, the nature of prior offences determined their prediction of their next offence more than available official data would deem reasonable. An incidental finding was that officers who rated the probability of further offending highest were also those who thought criminal careers most specialised. The implications for operational police decision-making were discussed and held to be profound.
    • Area and individual differences in personal crime victimisation incidence: The role of individual, lifestyle/routine activities and contextual predictors

      Pease, Ken; Andromachi, Tseloni; University of Derby (Sage, 2014-09-02)
      This article examines how personal crime differences between areas and between individuals are predicted by area and population heterogeneity and their synergies. It draws on lifestyle/routine activities and social disorganization theories to model the number of personal victimization incidents over individuals including routine activities and area characteristics, respectively, as well as their (cross-cluster) interactions. The methodology employs multilevel or hierarchical negative binomial regression with extra binomial variation using data from the British Crime Survey and the UK Census. Personal crime rates differ substantially across areas, reflecting to a large degree the clustering of individuals with measured vulnerability factors in the same areas. Most factors suggested by theory and previous research are conducive to frequent personal victimization except the following new results. Pensioners living alone in densely populated areas face disproportionally high numbers of personal crimes. Frequent club and pub visits are associated with more personal crimes only for males and adults living with young children, respectively. Ethnic minority individuals experience fewer personal crimes than whites. The findings suggest integrating social disorganization and lifestyle theories and prioritizing resources to the most vulnerable, rather than all,residents of poor and densely populated areas to prevent personal crimes.
    • Voles don't take taxis

      Pease, Ken; Loughborough University (Wiley, 2014-07-05)
      Johnson’s paper advances understanding of sequences of burglaries committed by thesame offender. Furthermore, it has heuristic value in suggesting new avenues for applicable research. Each of the current data shortcomings represents an opportunity for novel research approaches, and the optimum forager metaphor holds continuing appeal as an organizing principle helpful to operational policing.
    • The global crime drop and changes in the distribution of victimisation

      Pease, Ken & Ignatans, Dainis; University of Derby (Springer, 2016-09-27)
      Over three decades crime counts in England and Wales, as throughout the Western world, have fallen. Less attention has been paid to the distribution of crime across households, though this is crucial in determining optimal distribution of limited policing resources in pursuing the aim of distributive justice. The writers have previously demonstrated that in England and Wales the distribution of crime victimisation has remained pretty much unchanged over the period of the crime drop. The present paper seeks to extend the study of changes in the distribution of victimisation. Over time using data from 25 countries contributing data to the International Crime Victimisation Survey (ICVS) sweeps (1989–2000). While fragmentary, the data mirror the trends discerned in England and Wales. The trends are not an artefact of the inclusion of particular countries in particular sweeps. The demographic, economical, geographical and social household characteristics associated with victimisation are consistent across time. The suggested policy implication is the need for greater emphasis on preventing multiple victimisation.
    • Are victims of crime mostly angry or mostly afraid?

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Springer/ Palgrave, 2019-05)
      Analysis of the Crime Survey for England and Wales identifies anger and annoyance rather than fear as the most common emotional responses to victimisation by crime, despite fear’s pre-eminence in the criminological literature. While the trend since 2003 shows an increase in fear relative to anger, anger remains more common for all crime categories and all levels of victim-rated offence seriousness. The writers contend that the mismatch between the preponderance of anger in victim accounts and the preponderance of fear in the academic literature is convenient for government and police. Subtly setting fear as the default ‘appropriate’ emotion to be evoked by victimisation makes for a populace less inclined to ‘take matters into its own hands’. Plans to develop research on victim anger are outlined.
    • Disassembly and deconstruction analytics system (D-DAS) for construction in a circular economy

      Akanbi, Lukman A.; Oyedele, Lukumon O.; Omoteso, Kamil; Bilal, Muhammad; Akinade, Olugbenga O.; Ajayi, Anuoluwapo O.; Davila Delgado, Juan Manuel; Owolabi, Hakeem A.; Coventry University (Elsevier, 2019-03-15)
      Despite the relevance of building information modelling for simulating building performance at various life cycle stages, Its use for assessing the end-of-life impacts is not a common practice. Even though the global sustainability and circular economy agendas require that buildings must have minimal impact on the environment across the entire lifecycle. In this study therefore, a disassembly and deconstruction analytics system is developed to provide buildings’ end-of-life performance assessment from the design stage. The system architecture builds on the existing building information modelling capabilities in managing building design and construction process. The architecture is made up of four different layers namely (i) Data storage layer, (ii) Semantic layer, (iii) Analytics and functional models layer and (iv) Application layer. The four layers are logically connected to function as a single system. Three key functionalities of the disassembly and deconstruction analytics system namely (i) Building Whole Life Performance Analytics (ii) Building Element Deconstruction Analytics and (iii) Design for Deconstruction Advisor are implemented as plug-in in Revit 2017. Three scenarios of a case study building design were used to test and evaluate the performance of the system. The results show that building information modelling software capabilities can be extended to provide a platform for assessing the performance of building designs in respect of the circular economy principle of keeping the embodied energy of materials perpetually in an economy. The disassembly and deconstruction analytics system would ensure that buildings are designed with design for disassembly and deconstruction principles that guarantee efficient materials recovery in mind. The disassembly and deconstruction analytics tool could also serve as a decision support platform that government and planners can use to evaluate the level of compliance of building designs to circular economy and sustainability requirements.
    • Do employment services need to be neoliberal

      Nunn, Alex; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12)
      There is a divide in the literature on labour market governance between that which sees ‘workfare’ policies as part of a process of neoliberalisation and a more practice-oriented literature that is concerned with the effectiveness and outcomes of ‘active labour market policies’. This chapter engages with these separate but related literatures to make the argument that the trajectory of policy and practice reform in employment services has been inherently neoliberalising over recent decades, and that there is scope to repurpose some of the processes and tools that have been involved in this to more inclusive ends. The chapter proposes that the materialist feminist concept of social reproduction offers one lens through which a more inclusive approach to employment service delivery and management can be viewed. The discussion is tailored to the ways that both national policymakers, local and lower-level implementers and progressive activists may promote a more inclusive form of employment service through their ‘policy work’.
    • Whatever happened to repeat victimisation?

      Pease, Ken; Ignatans, Dainis; Batty, Lauren; University of Derby (Springer Link, 2018-10-04)
      Crime is concentrated at the individual level (hot dots) as well as at area level (hot spots). Research on repeat victimisation affords rich prevention opportunities but has been increasingly marginalised by policy makers and implementers despite repeat victims accounting for increasing proportions of total crime. The present paper seeks to trigger a resurgence of interest in research and initiatives based on the prevention of repeat victimisation.
    • Key skills and training needs of the D2N2 low carbon and environmental goods and services (LCEGS) sector

      Paterson, Fred; Baranova, Polina; Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Clarke, Lewis; Wond, Tracey; Lee, Amanda; Gill, Judith; Gallotta, Bruno; Eisen, Matthew; Nesterova, Iana; University of Derby; D2N2; European Union Social Fund (University of Derby, 2018-07)
      Low Carbon is one of eight priority business sectors identified in the D2N2 Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) Strategic Economic Plan (2014 – 2023). In January 2018, Learndirect (on behalf of the LEP) commissioned Derby Business School to research the key skills required by the Low Carbon and Environmental Goods and Services (LCEGS) sector in D2N2; map existing training provision for the sector and establish the needs of key sector supply chains. The research finds that many of the key issues and challenges for businesses that supply LCEGS identified in previous reports remain. Suggests, surprisingly, that as many as 1 in 4 firms are doing business in the sector; with 1 in 20 firms deriving more than 80% of their turnover from LCEGS. Estimates the number of LCEGS suppliers in 5 key sectors to demonstrate where skills provision could be targeted. Highlights the variety of skills needed in different sectors and some of the issues, gaps and challenges facing skills providers. Proposes that pro-environmental suppliers and innovators should be identified in each priority sector and the current and future skills needs relevant to each sector established. The report concludes that much of the business activity currently categorised as Low Carbon sector can be re-framed as pro-environmental innovation in existing traditional sectors.
    • Competitiveness through responsible supply chains and resource efficiency: a regional outlook

      Baranova, Polina; Paterson, Fred; University of Derby; East Midlands Chamber (University of Derby, 2018-02)
      This report describes an independent analysis by the University of Derby Business School (DBS) of surveys conducted by the East Midlands Chamber of Commerce (EMCC) in 2017 and 2015. Whilst the surveys were part of the EMCC’s routine quarterly engagement with local businesses that dealt with a range of traditional business interests, this analysis focuses upon a series of questions that addressed companies’ awareness and engagement with resource efficiency and the degree to which they supply and benefit from low carbon and environmental goods and services (LCEGS). Respondents to the EMCC survey were evenly balanced across Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and the three major cities therein. Similarly, there was a good balance between SMEs and larger businesses represented in the survey sample. The study shows that the number of businesses supplying low carbon and environmental goods and services (LCEGS) across the East Midlands is growing - with 24% of companies surveyed by EMCC in 2017 deriving some degree of turnover from LCEGS, compared with 16% in 2015. 12% of businesses surveyed generated more than 20% of their turnover from LCEGS in 2017, compared with only 8% of business in this category in 2015. According to the survey data, micro and small sized businesses have shown the greatest growth in LCEGS sector activity between 2015-2017. Both these categories of businesses show a significant increase in the number of businesses generating a proportion of their turnover from LCEGS (8.8% and 9.1% respectively). On the other hand, slightly more medium-sized businesses in 2017 said they derived no turnover from LCEGS (81.4%) compared with 2015 (79.7%). Whilst none of the large businesses in the sample generated their entire turnover from LCEGS in 2017, they increased the proportion of their LCEGS turnover in the 20-49% and 50-79% categories (by 9.6% and 6.1% respectively). Countering this trend, however, was a 2.6% decrease in large businesses deriving 80-100% of turnover from LCEGS. The three top manufacturing sectors in the region by contribution to the LCEGS sector in both 2015 and 2017 samples are: construction, engineering & manufacturing and the energy and water supply sectors. The top three services sectors across the region, by their contribution to the LCEGS sector are: professional services, transport and logistics, and retail sectors. Compared with other key sectors in the region, the construction sector alongside energy and water services derive the largest proportion of turnover from LCEGS. However, engineering & manufacture, transport & logistics, retail and professional services companies are all showing significant growth in LCEGS business. On average, in 2017 manufacturing sector companies generated more annual turnover from LCEGS than companies operating in the services sector. This is a 20% improvement on 2015 figures, which indicate that over the last two years more and more regional businesses in the manufacturing sectors successfully supply LCEGS. Businesses operating in the various services sector are significantly lagging behind this trend with little increase in the supply of low carbon environmental services over the last two years.
    • Penal populism and the public thermostat: crime, public punitiveness, and public policy.

      Jennings, Will; Farrall, Stephen; Gray, Emily; Hay, Colin; University of Sheffield; Department of Politics & International Relations; University of Southampton; Centre for Criminological Research; University of Sheffield; Centre for Criminological Research; University of Sheffield; Sciences Po; Paris (Wiley, 2016-06-02)
      This article makes the case that feedback processes in democratic politics—between crime rates, public opinion, and public policy—can account for the growth of penal populism in Britain. It argues that the public recognize and respond to rising (and falling) levels of crime, and that in turn public support for being tough on crime is translated into patterns of imprisonment. This contributes to debates over the crime–opinion–policy connection, unpacking the dynamic processes by which these relationships unfold at the aggregate level. This uses the most extensive data set ever assembled on aggregate opinion on crime in Britain to construct a new over‐time measure of punitive attitudes. The analysis first tests the thermostatic responsiveness of punitive attitudes to changes in recorded crime rates as well as self‐reported victimization, and then examines the degree to which changes in mass opinion impact on criminal justice policy.
    • Political socialization, worry about crime and antisocial behaviour: an analysis of age, period and cohort effects.

      Gray, Emily; Grasso, Maria; Farrall, Stephen; Jennings, Will; Hay, Colin; University of Sheffield; Centre for Criminological Research, School of Law, University of Sheffield, Winter Street, Sheffield, UK; Department of Politics, University of Sheffield, Northumberland Road, Sheffield, UK; Centre for Criminological Research, School of Law, University of Sheffield, Winter Street, Sheffield, UK; Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, UK; Centre d’Études Européennes, Sciences Po, Paris, France (Oxford University Presss, 2018-08-07)
      Fear of crime occupies a substantial area of research and theorizing in criminology. Yet, it has not been examined within a longitudinal framework of political socialization. Using insights from generational modelling, we explore how political cohorts influence the fear of crime and perceptions of antisocial behaviour. This ‘age, period and cohort’ (APC) approach recognizes the distinct temporal processes of (1) individual ageing, (2) current contexts and (3) generational membership and is crucial to understanding the origins and shape of social change. We employ repeated cross-sectional data from the British Crime Survey in an APC analysis to explore how worry about crime and perceptions of antisocial behaviour were impacted by the sociopolitical environment in which respondents spent their ‘formative years’. Our results underline the theoretical significance of political socialization and the methodological consequence of longitudinal analyses when exploring public perceptions of crime. We find that political socialization can have a distinctive and enduring impression on public perceptions of crime from childhood into middle age.
    • Revisiting Margaret Thatcher’s law and order agenda: The slow-burning fuse of punitiveness.

      Farrall, Stephen; Burke, Naomi; Hay, Colin; University of Sheffield; Centre d'études européennes de Sciences Po (2015-08-24)
      In recent years, criminologists have devoted growing attention to the extent to which ‘punitiveness’ is emerging as a central feature of many criminal justice systems. In gauging punitiveness, these studies typically rely either on attitudinal data derived from surveys that measure individual support for punitive sentences or on the size of the prison population. We take a different approach, exploring the aims, content and outcomes of various Acts of Parliament passed between 1982 and 1998 in England and Wales. Our argument is that while a trend towards punitiveness is detectable, this was, in the case of England and Wales, attributable to wider discourses stemming from the New Right of the 1980s. This in turn promoted a new conception of how best to tackle rising crime. We show that while the year 1993 stands out as a key point in the growing trajectory of punitiveness in England and Wales, the ideas and rhetoric around ‘toughness’ in the criminal justice system can be traced back much further than this. Our article brings these matters to the attention of political scientists and demonstrates how historical institutionalist thinking can guide and inform interdisciplinary work at the interface between political science and criminology.
    • Emotions, future selves and the process of desistance.

      Hunter, Ben; Farrall, Stephen; University of Sheffield; University of Greenwich (Oxford University Press, 2017-03-21)
      Desistance research emphasizes that offenders identify a future self that aids desistance efforts. However, it is unclear how future selves operate when offending opportunities arise. To explore this, we employ qualitative accounts of instances when offenders and ex-offenders abstained from offending, and the emotions this evoked. Offending was avoided to preserve aspects of offenders’ lives or avoid negative consequences but, for some, avoiding offending brought frustration. Finally, those who had made the most progress towards desistance were less likely to identify opportunities for offending. These findings suggest future selves inform the desistance process, highlighting particular ways to be. However, time is needed to build up valued aspects of the life that may be feared lost if engaging in crime. Before the benefits of abstaining are recognized, there may be a tension between the future and current self.
    • Is the ‘shadow of sexual assault’ responsible for women’s higher fear of burglary?

      Hirtenlehner, Helmut; Farrall, Stephen; University of Sheffield (Oxford University Press, 2014-08-02)
      This article examines the ‘shadow of sexual assault hypothesis’ which posits that women’s higher fear of crime, compared to males, can be attributed to their elevated fear of sexual victimization. We argue that the previous, overwhelmingly supportive, research on this issue is incomplete in three ways: (1) the thesis has not yet been extensively tested outside of North America, (2) competing, possibly overlaying, shadow effects of physical violence have widely been ignored and (3) perceptually contemporaneous offences have always been measured in an indirect manner. Drawing on the example of fear of burglary, this work tackles the afore-mentioned deficiencies. Results from a crime survey conducted in the United Kingdom indicate that, when relying on a rather traditional test strategy, the ‘shadow of sexual assault hypothesis’ is supported. However, the findings are highly contingent on the employed methodology. When utilizing direct measures of perceptually contemporaneous offences, only physical, not sexual, assault turns out to cast a shadow over fear of burglary. The impact of fear of rape would appear to be reduced considerably once fear of broader physical harm is taken into account. We conclude that much of the existing evidence for the shadow thesis can be challenged on the grounds of failing to control for the effects of non-sexual physical assault and drawing on an inadequate operationalization of perceptually contemporaneous offences.
    • Criminal Careers in Transition: The Social Context of Desistance from Crime

      Farrall, Stephen; Hunter, Ben; Sharpe, Gilly; Calverley, Adam; University of Sheffield (Oxford University Press, 2014)
      Continuing previous work exploring why people stop offending, and the processes by which they are rehabilitated in the community, Criminal Careers in Transition: The Social Context of Desistance from Crime follows the completion of a fifth sweep of interviews with members of a cohort of former probationers interviewed since the late-1990s. The research undertaken since the inception of the project in 1996 has focused on developing a long-term evidence base, rather than a rapid assessment, examining whether (and how) probation supervision assists desistance from crime. Building on interviews from previous sweeps, the authors continue their exploration into the needs identified by probation officers and probationers, the extent to which these have been successfully met over the medium to long-term, and whether this suggests that probation helps probationers to desist. The authors argue that probation supervision did indeed help the probationers, but that this had taken a long time to 'bear fruit' and was related to other social and personal changes. There is discussion of a number of key topics, including sample members' continued social and personal development (including the impact of parenthood on them) and their motivation to change and maintain a law-abiding lifestyle, as well as their experiences of dealing with the stigma of a criminal record and the long-term process of 'remaking' themselves. This core empirical research and analysis is framed by a comprehensive review of not only the contemporary literature on desistance and reoffending, but also what constitutes a successful and effective research design in this field. Whilst there have been several attempts to develop theories of desistance, few have attempted to understand and theorise the long-term impacts of probation supervision. Criminal Careers in Transition addresses this by building an account of the processes which help to shape the speed, nature, and direction of an individual's efforts to avoid further offending and, thus, develop a theory of assisted desistance. The book continues the authors' exploration of the emotional trajectories of crime, victimisation, and desistance and the role of citizenship values in pathways out of crime, as well as original research into the spatial dynamics of desistance.
    • Socialization and generational political trajectories: an age, period and cohort analysis of political participation in Britain.

      Grasso, Maria Teresa; Farrall, Stephen; Gray, Emily; Hay, Colin; Jennings, Will; University of Sheffield; University of Southampton; Centre d’études européennes, SciencesPo, Paris, France (Taylor & Francis, 2018-06-05)
      The role of political socialization in explaining disengagement from specific modes of activism beyond voting remains largely unexplored, limited to date by available data and methods. While most previous studies have tended to propose explanations for disengagement linked to specific repertoires of political action, we propose a unified theory based on the different socialization experiences of subsequent generations. We test this theory using a new dataset of collated waves of the British Social Attitudes Survey and by applying age–period–cohort models for repeated cross-sectional data and generalized additive models to identify generational effects. We show that generational effects underlie the participatory decline across repertoires. Consistent with our expectations, the results reveal that the generation of “Thatcher’s Children” are much less likely to engage in a range of repertoires of political action than “Wilson/Callaghan’s Children”, who came of age in the more politicized 1960s and 1970s. Significantly, and in line with our theoretical expectations, the “Blair’s Babies” generation is the least politically engaged of all. We reflect on these findings and highlight the concerning implications of falling levels of activism for advanced democracies.