• Religious minorities and freedom of religion or belief in the UK

      Weller, Paul; Coventry University; University of Derby; Regent's Park College, University of Oxford (Brill, 2018-03-27)
      By particular reference to the polity of the UK, this article discusses issues and options for groups identified as "religious minorities" in relation to issues of "religious freedom". It does so by seeking to ensure that such contemporary socio-legal discussions are rooted empirically in the full diversity of the UK's contemporary religious landscape, while taking account of (especially) 19th century (mainly Christian) historical antecedents. It argues that properly to understand the expansion in scope and substance of religious freedom achieved in the 19th century that account needs to be taken of the agency of the groups that benefited from this. Finally, it argues this history can be seen as a "preconfiguration" of the way in which religious minorities have themselves acted as key drivers for change in relevant 20th and 21st century UK law and social policy and could continue to do so in possible futures post-Brexit Referendum.
    • The relationship between environmental worldviews, emotions and personal efficacy in climate change

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G.; Monash University (IJAS, 2014)
      This study investigates the effects of a video on the Australian viewers’ environmental worldviews, their emotions and personal efficacy in climate change. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were employed to test the associations between the constructs. The main theoretical contribution relates to the mediating role of emotions in climate change communication. Results further show that the video increased viewers’ perception that they can influence climate change outcomes, as well as encourage others to reduce the effects of climate change. Findings suggest that effective climate change communication has to target people’s emotions. Policy should be directed to climate change communication tools with a focus on emotional engagement to encourage people to take personal responsibility in climate change and act, catalysing the desired behavioural change.
    • Visitor satisfaction and place attachment in national parks

      Smith, L. D. G; Kneebone, S. C.; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 01/08/2014)
      This study examines the relationships between visitor satisfaction and place attachment. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test competing models of visitor satisfaction and place attachment represented as a (i) unidimensional, (ii) first-order, and (iii) second-order factor. Data were collected from a sample of 525 visitors at the Bruce Peninsula National Park, in the state of Ontario, Canada. Results indicate visitor satisfaction is a better predictor of place attachment as a second-order construct. Findings are discussed with respect to their applied and theoretical relevance. Practical applications of the study include strategies aimed at achieving optimum visitor satisfaction and promoting place attachment in national parks.
    • Authenticity as a value co-creator of tourism experiences.

      Ramkissoon, H; Uysal, M. S.; Monash University (CABI, 09/07/2014)
      As the field of tourism grows in maturity and scientific sophistication, it is important to fully understand the breadth and depth of vacation experience value. Current research delivers a multitude of approaches to value creation, represented here as a set of definitions, perspectives, and interpretations of how tourists, as customers, create value alone and with others. Providing an analytical and systematic clarification of the approaches, this book suggests an understanding of the differences, offering new and practical knowledge for tourism scholars and professionals to highlight the relevance of the concept to firms and organizations. Including a framework to distinguish among key resources or antecedents of customer value, this book also considers consumer behaviour and factors affecting value creation from physiological and psychological perspectives. Concluding with a summary of the areas for future research, it is a valuable resource for researchers of tourism, leisure and recreation.
    • Authenticity: the link between destination image and place attachment

      Jiang, Y; Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T; Feng, S.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 17/06/2016)
      This study explores the relationships between destination image, existential authenticity, and different dimensions of place attachment in the nature-based tourism context. A visitor-centric model is proposed in which existential authenticity is the principal mechanism that links destination image to different dimensions of place attachment. Data was collected in a survey of international visitors to two popular nature-based tourism destinations in Australia. The results indicate (a) a positive and significant effect of destination image on existential authenticity; (b) a positive and significant effect of existential authenticity on place dependence, place identity, place affect, and place social bonding; and (c) a significant mediating effect of existential authenticity in the relationship between destination image and each of the four dimensions of place attachment. The implications of this study for academics, tourism authorities, and destination marketing managers are discussed.
    • Proenvironmental behavior: critical link between satisfaction and place attachment in Australia and Canada

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T.; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 23/03/2017)
      This study explores issues of scale equivalence and generalizability in national parks. Visitors' place satisfaction, proenvironmental behavior, and place attachment are measured across two qualitatively distinct populations in Australia and Canada. Techniques employed in this cross-country study bring an important contribution to tourism research. The primary focus is to establish measure equivalence before undertaking hypothesis testing using structural equation modeling on a sample of 339 repeat visitors at the Dandenong Ranges National Park, Australia, and 296 repeat visitors at the Bruce Peninsula National Park, Canada. Results from both samples indicate (a) there is measure equivalence between the Australian and Canadian samples allowing comparability of findings, (b) a positive and significant effect of visitor place satisfaction on proenvironmental behavioral intentions, (c) a significant and positive influence of proenvironmental behavioral intention on place attachment (place identity, place dependence, place social bonding, place affect), and (d) a significant and negative effect of visitor place satisfaction on place social bonding. The main finding relates to the promotion of proenvironmental behaviors among national park users that—in addition to individual benefits—provides environmental sustainability as well as practical benefits for park managers and society.
    • Destination marketing and visitor experiences: the development of a conceptual framework

      Jiang, Y; Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 13/11/2015)
      When confronted with increasingly experienced, demanding, and sophisticated visitors, destination marketers may find it problematic to succeed in destination marketing. This article attempts to address this challenge through the exploration of the relationship between destination image and two critical indicators of successful destination marketing: visitor delight and place attachment. It integratesdisparate themes in destination marketing and recognizes the relationshipsbetween marketing stimuli, customer experiences, and marketing outcomes. A comprehensive and coherent theoretical model is established to explain the complexities involved in the formation of important destination marketing outcomes. This article critically examines fun and customer orientation as two key concepts of visitor experiences and proposes them as principal mechanisms that mediate the relationship between destination image and visitor responses (visitor delight and place attachment). The article’s theoretical contributions, limitations, and practical implications for tourism authorities and destination marketers are discussed
    • Proenvironmental behavior: the link between place attachment and place satisfaction.

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T.; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 01/12/2014)
      The study tested whether proenvironmental behavioral intention mediates the relationship between place attachment and place satisfaction among visitors of the Dandenong Ranges National Park in Australia. Structural equation modeling was employed on a sample of 452 visitors. Regression models were estimated to test the mediating effect of proenvironmental behavioral intentions on the relationships between place dependence, place identity, place affect, place social bonding, and place satisfaction. Results show that as hypothesized, these effects were mediated by proenvironmental behavioral intentions, except for the relationship between place social bonding and place satisfaction. An important theoretical contribution is the mediating role of proenvironmental behavioral intentions in nature-based settings. Practical applications of the study include marketing aimed at encouraging repeat visitation by increasing levels of place attachment and place satisfaction in national parks through proenvironmental message development and delivery.
    • Evaluating the effectiveness of wipe for wildlife and its campaign elements

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G.; Monash University (01/2014)
    • The satisfaction-place attachment relationship: Potential mediators and moderators.

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T; Monash University (Elsevier, 23/05/2015)
      Researchers use place satisfaction as a dependent variable extensively since place has implications for a range of performance measures. This study reverses the relationships suggesting place satisfaction as a useful antecedent to place attachment. Place satisfaction, measured as visitors' summative evaluation of their experience is likely to be more positively associated with place dependence, identity, affect, and social bonding. The findings of this study support this contention and establish that one of the principal mechanisms linking place satisfaction to place attachment is pro-environmental behavioral intention (PEB). The study further finds that gender moderates the relationship between PEB and place attachment. The conditional indirect effect of place satisfaction on place attachment is significant only for male visitors. The article closes with implications of the study for academics and practitioners.
    • Samadhi spa & wellness retreat

      Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Kendall/Hunt Publishing, 23/08/2013)
    • Authenticity, satisfaction, and place attachment: A conceptual framework for cultural tourism in African island economies

      Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 12/02/2015)
      Small islands often host distinctive resources to influence their future through tourism development. Island economies in Africa have witnessed a growing number of tourists seeking authentic cultural and natural heritage tourism attractions. This paper critically examines and bridges the nexus between perceived authenticity, place attachment, place satisfaction and cultural behavioural intentions of tourists in African island economies. Adopting a theoretical framework from the authenticity literature, and the attitude-behaviour framework, this paper develops and proposes a conceptual model to investigate how authenticity of a cultural tourism attraction might influence place satisfaction, which in turn might influence levels of place attachment and prompt cultural behavioural intentions of tourists in African island economies. This research conceptually contributes to knowledge advocating the associations between constructs of authenticity, place satisfaction, place attachment, and cultural behavioural intentions of tourists in African island economies. Limitations of the study and practical implications for sustainable tourism development are discussed.
    • Managing customer relationships in hotel chains: a comparison between guest and manager perceptions

      Mavondo, F. T.; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Routledge, 03/06/2016)
    • How Influencing Behaviours Can Accelerate the Transition to a Water Sensitive City.

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G; Kneebone, S. C; Monash University (CRC for Water Sensitive Cities, 31/01/2015)
      his Behaviour Assessment Database has been compiled as part of the CRC Water for Sensitive Cities project on 'Accelerating to Water Sensitive Cities by Influencing Behaviour' (Project A2.2). The overarching goal of this research project is to develop and test interventions that seek to change desirable behaviours, primarily in residents, to assist a movement toward water sensitive cities.
    • Visitors' experience, place attachment and sustainable behaviour at cultural heritage sites: a conceptual framework

      Buonincontri, P; Marasco, A; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (MDPI, 26/06/2017)
      Sustainable tourism research has attracted wide interest from scholars and practitioners. While several heritage sites are mandated to provide optimum visitor satisfaction with increasing competition in the market, managers of heritage sites face growing challenges in striking a balance between consumption and conservation. This calls for promoting more sustainable behaviours among consumers of heritage. This study proposes a conceptualization of sustainable behaviour for heritage consumers. Using the attitude–behaviour relationship underpinned by the Theory of Reasoned Action, it develops and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates visitors’ heritage experiences, their attachment to heritage sites, and their general and site-specific sustainable heritage behaviour and presents their interrelationships as proposed hypotheses. Theoretical contributions and practical implications for heritage site managers are discussed.
    • Leadership in destination management organisations.

      Hristov, D; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Elsevier, 21/09/2016)
    • Social involvement and park citizenship as moderators for quality-of-life in a national park

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F; Uysal, M. S.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 17/08/2017)
      This paper contributes to the advancement of quality-of-life research in tourism by examining complex relationships involving direct, mediated, moderated and moderated mediation relationships among the antecedents to quality-of-life. Using a sample of 222 repeat visitors in an Australian national park, the findings indicate positive significant effects of (1) place satisfaction on quality-of-life; (2) place satisfaction on place attachment; (3) place attachment on quality-of-life; (4) park citizenship on place attachment. The findings further support that (5) place attachment mediates the relationship between place satisfaction and quality-of-life; (6) social involvement moderates the relationship between place satisfaction and place attachment; (7) park citizenship moderates the relationship between place satisfaction and place attachment; (8) social involvement moderates the relationship between place attachment and quality-of-life; (9) social involvement moderates the indirect effect of place satisfaction on quality-of-life. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Park managers, for example, need to promote on-site marketing and post-visit communication/interpretation, encouraging repeat visits and behavioural change. Message delivery needs to promote a sense of belonging to the park with personal meaning, creating place distinctiveness. Personal actions to promote include signing petitions supporting the park's biodiversity, and other resources, and volunteering to participate in meetings and other direct actions.
    • Social customer relationship management: an integrated conceptual framework

      Dewnarain, S; Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 15/10/2018)
      In recent years, the concept of customer relationship management (CRM) has undergone a major change from being a strategy that focused solely on establishing financial bonds with customers to one that promotes both transactional and interactional relationships with customers. This has given rise to a new form of CRM which is known as social customer relationship management (SCRM) or CRM 2.0. Hence, this study develops and proposes a conceptual model to address relationships between customer relationship management, social media technologies, customer engagement, positive word of mouth and brand loyalty. This paper brings significant contributions to hospitality CRM literature and marketing communication theory. It serves as a reference for hospitality practitioners who can derive insights on the potential economic advantage such as brand loyalty and consumer behaviour benefits in the form of positive word of mouth which can result from the effective implementation of a SCRM strategy.
    • Role of ethnic cultural events to build an authentic destination image

      Shabnam, S; Choudhury, A; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 21/12/2018)
      Local festivals are becoming increasingly important tourist attractions for the sophisticated tourist in quest of new authentic experiences (Ramkissoon and Uysal, 2014; Ramkissoon, 2015, 2016). The extent to which local festivals can grow as a point of attraction for international tourists while ful?lling their social and cultural roles at the national level is an issue of immense importance to social and cultural policymakers and destination marketers. This chapter explores the local festival of ‘Pohela Boishakh’, which is the celebration of the Bengali New Year. It is recognised by UNESCO as ‘Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity’ and identified as the largest national event of Bangladesh, a developing economy with crucial geo-political importance in the South Asian region, with substantial economic promises for the local population (UNESCO, 2016). This chapter draws on Getz et al. (2006)’s framework to explore festival stakeholder relationships, especially resource dependency issues, with a view to advancing the application of stakeholder theory to festival tourism, festival management and marketing in an integrated manner. Implications for tourism and event management along with theoretical advances are discussed with suggestions for future research in the field.