• Sector-focused approach to business events in Manchester

      Vokacova, Zuzana; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
    • Small cities with big dreams: creative placemaking and branding strategies

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-12)
    • Event portfolio management: theory and methods for event management and tourism

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ziakas, Vassilios; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; Plymouth Marjon University; University of Calgary (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
      Event Portfolio Management' explores the phenomenon of the event portfolio as a policy tool for cities and destinations. Divided into two parts – ‘Theory’ and ‘Practice’ – the book critically analyses and summarises key underpinnings behind portfolio theory development and identifies key trends and issues in the event portfolio approach. It examines the processes of event portfolio development and management, leveraging, stakeholder networking and collaboration, portfolio design, risk assessment and evaluation. With a wide geographical reach, the book introduces the results of empirical research from different international case studies, including Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin in New Zealand, Canberra and Melbourne in Australia, and Manchester and Edinburgh in the UK.
    • Alternative research methods: introducing marketing sensing, a qualitative and interpretive perspective on research

      Longbottom, David; Lawson, Alison; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12-07)
      This chapter examines research from an interpretive perspective where qualitative methods are predominantly used. We present that qualitative methods may be used by researchers seeking to gain deeper insights and understanding of underlying issues particularly in the context of social science studies which often involve people and organisations in a social setting. We will argue that such methods can be used within an interpretive philosophy, or may be combined with quantitative methods in a pragmatic and mixed methods approach. Whilst the chapter considers traditional methods associated with qualitative research, such as depth interview and focus group, it also introduces several alternative methods and techniques which may be used by researchers seeking to gain creativity in their research design and presentation and provide deeper understanding to build their analysis and research conclusions. The chapter is arranged in two parts. In part one, we examine issues of context, philosophy, approach and strategy. In part two, we examine issues of strategy and methods, planning, data collection, and data presentation.
    • Bridge over troubled waters? Model remedy to resolve cross-border legal disputes

      Meiselles, Michala; Klaff, Joel; University of Derby (Wildy & Sons, 2020)
      In this era typified by shifting national allegiances, reemergence of nationalist forces, isolationism, and disintegration of trade blocs, the stability and longevity of commercial ties have become crucial, with private law procedures (such as nachfrist) offering much needed flexibility if and when disputes arise between contracting parties. Looking at nachfrist from a critical point of view, we explore the benefits associated with this facility and argue that as a model remedy for the resolution of international commercial disputes, nachfrist enhances efficiency, saving the contracting parties and the economy at large, time, money, and resources, whilst reducing economic waste in trade.
    • Cultural Connections: the role of the arts and humanities in Competitiveness and Local Development

      Turner, Royce; Hughes, Alan; Kitson, Michael; Bullock, A.; Milner, I.; University of Cambridge (Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge, 2014-03-07)
      Cultural institutions are a prominent part of UK society – and many have a rich and long heritage. The impact of such institutions has often been evaluated in terms of engagement and participation or on the direct economic impact of cultural institutions. This study primarily focuses on the wider role of cultural institutions in their local economies; their innovative activities; how they connect to other local organisations such as universities; and how they collaborate with academics from the arts and humanities.
    • Bullying in adolescent residential care: The influence of the physical and social residential care environment

      Sekol, Ivana; Faculty of Education, University of Osijek, Croatia (Springer, 2015-10-28)
      To date, no study examined possible contributions of environmental factors to bullying and victimization in adolescent residential care facilities. By testing one part of the Multifactor Model of Bullying in Secure Setting (MMBSS; Ireland in Int J Adolesc Med Health 24(1):63–68, 2012), this research examined the way the physical and social residential environment relates to bullying and victimization in adolescent residential care. Young people aged 11–21 (N = 272) from ten residential institutions in Croatia completed: (a) an anonymous self-reported bullying questionnaire; (b) the social residential environment questionnaire; and (c) the physical residential environment questionnaire. The results demonstrated that both bullies and victims reported having significantly lower levels of perceived peer support than other residents. Male bullies also reported significantly lower levels of their overall wellbeing within their facilities and were significantly more likely than non-bullies to perceive their facilities as having problems with cleanliness and food. Male victims were significantly younger than non-victims. Female victims reported lower levels of their overall wellbeing than non-victims as well as poorer relationship with staff. The results are discussed with reference to the relevant prison and schoolbased bullying literature and directions for future research are provided. Overall, the findings of this study are consistent with the part of the MMBSS (Ireland 2012) examined and provide initial support for the notion that the special nature of the physical and social residential environment may be important in explaining bullying in care.
    • Personal characteristics of bullying victims in residential care for youth

      Sekol, Ivana; Farrington, David; Faculty of Education, University of Osijek, Croatia; University of Cambridge (Emerald, 2016-04-11)
      This research examined some personal characteristics of victims of bullying in residential care for youth. The paper aims to discuss these issues. The results demonstrated that male and female victims lacked self-esteem, presented with neurotic personality traits and were likely to believe that bullying was just part of life in residential care. Female victims also presented with lower levels of agreeableness and conscientiousness, while male victims were young and had a history of victimisation during their previous placement, in school and at the beginning of their current placements.Victims in care might benefit from programmes addressing their low self-esteem, high neuroticism and attitudes approving of bullying. Male residential groups should not accommodate young boys together with older boys. New residents who have a history of victimisation during their previous placement and in school should be supervised more intensively but in a manner that does not increase their perception of being victimised.The present study is the first work that examines individual characteristics of bullying victims in care institutions for young people. As such, the study offers some insights on how to protect residential care bullying victims.
    • The application of big data and AI in the upstream supply chain

      Hanson-New, Colin; Daniel, Jay; University of Derby (Logistics Research Network, 2019-09)
      The use of Big Data has grown in popularity in organisations to exploit the purpose of their primary data to enhance their competitiveness. In conjunction with the increased use of Big Data, there has also been a growth in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to analyse the vast amounts of data generated and provide a mechanism for locating and constructing useable patterns that organisations can incorporate in their supply chain strategy programme. As these organisations embrace the use of technology and embed this in their supply chain strategy, there are questions as to how this may affect their upstream supply chains especially with regards to how SME’s may be able to cope with the potential changes. There exists the opportunity to conduct further research into this area, mainly focusing on three key industry sectors of aerospace, rail and automotive supply chains.
    • Two decades of European self-employment: Is the answer to who becomes self-employed different over time and countries?

      Millán, José María; Yue, Wei; Cowling, M; University of Derby; University of Huelva; University of Brighton (Elsevier, 2019-10-01)
    • Events in a changing world - Introductory remarks

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Azara, Iride; Pappas, Nikolaos; University of Derby; University of Sunderland (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019-03-21)
    • Differential market valuations of board busyness across alternative banking models

      Elnahas, Marwa; Omoteso, Kamil; Salama, Aly; Trinh, Vu Quang; Newcastle University; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-09-03)
      This study comparatively assesses the influence of board busyness (i.e., multiple directorships of outside directors) on stock market valuations of both Islamic and conventional banks. For a sample of listed banks from 11 countries for the period 2010-2015, results show that board busyness is differentially priced by investors depending on the bank type. In conventional banks, board busyness is significantly and positively valued by the stock market. This result suggests that investors perceive some reputational benefits arising from a busy board (e.g., extended industry knowledge, established external networks or facilitation of external market sources). In contrast, we find no supporting evidence on the market valuations of board busyness in Islamic banks. This result might be attributed to, both, the complex governance structure and the uniqueness of the business model which require additional effective monitoring, relative to that employed in conventional banking. Our results also show that investors provide significantly low market valuations for busy Shari’ah advisory board which acts as an additional layer of governance in Islamic banks. Findings in this study offer important policy implications to international banking studies and regulations governing countries with dual-banking systems.
    • Adoption of blockchain technology in supply chain transparency: Australian manufacturer case study

      Maroun, Elias A.; Daniel, Jay; Fynes, Brian; University of Derby; University of Technology Sydney; University College Dublin (European Decision Sciences Institute (EDSI), 2019-06)
      The arrival and capabilities of Blockchain is set to change traditional supply chain activities. Consumers are increasingly demanding details about the products they purchase, the sources of the manufactured product and manufacturing details. Organisations are declaring that they strive to improve labour practices and minimise the environmental effect of manufacturing goods however consumers still have a limited view of supply chains. The increasing development of the digital economy, the internet of things (IOT) and the growing use of sensors providing information in supply chains is providing Blockchain leverage to streamline and create an efficient supply chain track and trace of all types of transactions more transparently and securely. This paper explores the adoption of Blockchain technology in supply chain transparency. Specifically, we examine whether Blockchain technology is a good fit for use in an Australian manufacturer supply chain. Blockchain allows us to have permissioned or permission-less distributed ledgers where stakeholders can interact with each other. We describe in detail how Blockchain works and the mechanism of hash algorithms, which allows for greater security of information. Using a single case study, we focus on the intricacies of this technology and present a summary of adoption for Blockchain technology. The adoption for using Blockchain technology has the potential to bring greater transparency, validity across the supply chain, and improvement of communication between all stakeholders involved.
    • An investigation of supply chain operational improvements for small and medium enterprises (SMEs): A UK manufacturing case study

      Sawe, Fredrick; Daniel, Jay; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2019-07)
      In an increasingly turbulent business environment and intensive market competition and globalisation, manufacturing organisations of the 21st century have been forced to continuously seek improvements in their supply chain operations to increase productivity and quality. Therefore, making competition no longer between organisations but rather among its supply chains by seeking to reduce costs and improve quality as an alternative to gain higher market share. This paper investigates different aspects of operations and supply chain improvement of a small and medium manufacturing organisation in UK. The main objective of this paper is to help SMEs to identify deficiencies in their operations and take necessary steps to correct them to enhance performance and productivity in their supply chain operations. For this to happen, the current study has implemented lean approach as a method to improve the organisation’s supply chain, enhancing the quality of processes and products. By conducting interviews and observations together with gathering company internal records, it remarks some potential problems of the manufacturing company. Finally, several recommendations (such as introducing ERP system) are made for future improvements.
    • Market consolidation, market growth, or new market development? Owner, firm, and competitive determinants

      Weixi, Liu; Wei, Yue; Hang, Do; Cowling, M; University of Brighton; Bath Management School; Kingston Business School (Seante Hall Academic Publishing, 2019-03-31)
      Market entry decisions are complex and involve high sunk costs with uncertain or risky outcomes. In this study we explore how owner, firm, and competitive pressures shape this decision. Using a large UK data set of SMEs, we find that the preferred form of growth, and growth is not always desired, is expansion in existing markets. Key determinants of the decision to pursue a new market entry strategy are formal education, and large firm based market competition. Further, these decisions are made simultaneously not sequentially.
    • Investigating performance indicators disclosure in sustainability reports of large mining companies in Ghana

      Clement, A; Wu, J; Yago, M; Zhang, J; University of Cape Coast (Emerald, 07/08/2017)
      The purpose of this study is to examine the degree, contents and trend development of Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) performance indicators disclosed in sustainability reports of large mining companies in Ghana. Content analysis methods are used to analyse 50 sustainability reports of ten large-scale mining companies in Ghana, covering the period 2008-2012. The study finds that there has been a widening and increasing trend in the disclosure of performance indicators in sustainability reports of the large mining companies in Ghana, in accordance with GRI guidelines. The findings suggest that good progress in the strategic sector has been made in the voluntary adoption of the GRI guidelines to increase transparency, credibility and comparability in sustainability reporting. The findings also indicate areas to be improved. The Government of Ghana and the Ghana Chamber of Mines could learn from the findings about the current status of this matter in order for them to formulate policies and regulations which would encourage the mining sector in moving forward in the adoption of international reporting standards.This paper initializes investigation into the degree, contents and trends of performance indicators in sustainability reports of large mining companies in Ghana using content analysis.
    • Corporate social responsibility and performance: A case study of mining companies in Ghana

      Clement, A; Adibo; Tackie, G; University of Cape Coast (International Knowledge Sharing Platform, 2017)
      Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has become very important in recent years, especially its impact on business operations. Using mining companies in Ghana as a case study, this study investigates the extent to which CSR activities engaged by companies relate to their performance.Content analysis is used in measuring the CSR activities of mining companies in Ghana. The study reveals a positive relationship between return on equity and all the CSR variables(environmental management systems, employee relations and community performance). Net profit margin relates positively with CSR activities such as environmental management system and employee relations whilst return on asset was found to have a positive relationship with only oneemployee relations. Mining companies should be engaged in CSR activities that positively impact on financial performance since this eventually translate into creating value for host communities.
    • The innovation debt penalty: Cost of debt, loan default, and the effects of a public loan guarantee on high-tech firms

      Cowling, M; Ughetto, E; Lee, N.; University of Brighton (Elsevier, 28/06/2017)
      High-technology firms per se are perceived to be more risky than other, more conventional, firms. It follows that financial institutions will take this into account when designing loan contracts, and that this will manifest itself in more costly debt. In this paper we empirically test whether the provision of a government loan guarantee fundamentally changes the way lenders price debt to high-tech firms. Further, we also examine whether there are differential loan price effects of a public guarantee depending on the nature of the firms themselves and the nature of the economic and innovation environment that surrounds them. Using a large UK dataset of 29,266 guarantee backed loans we find that there is a high-tech risk premium which is justified by higher default, but, in general, that this premium is altered significantly when a public guarantee is provided for all firms. Further, all these loan price effects differ on precise spatial economic and innovation attributes.
    • The role of loan commitment terms in credit allocation on the UK small firms loan guarantee scheme

      Cowling, M; Matthews, C; Liu, W.; University of Brighton (Senate Hall Academic Publishing, 31/03/2017)
      In this paper we provide empirical evidence concerning the nature of loan commitment contracts as reflected by individual loan contract parameters in influencing the size of bank commitments. Specifically, we consider how the quantitative allocation of credit, the loan amount, is affected or altered by changes to other components of the total loan package. By doing so we shed some more light on the types of real world trade-offs that credit constrained firms might face when approaching banks for funds, using the UK governments loan guarantee programme. Our results point at the importance of relationship lending in the UK.
    • On the productive efficiency of Australian businesses: firm size and age class effects

      Cowling, M; Tanewski, G.; University of Brighton (Elsevier, 22/06/2018)
      After 26 years of growth, the Australian economy is beginning to show signs of stress and declining productivity. In this paper, we consider aspects of productive efficiency using an Australian business population data set. Using a production function approach, several key findings are uncovered. Firstly, decreasing returns to scale are identified as a significant feature of the Australian business sector. This implies that not all firm growth will lead to productivity gains. Secondly, there are significant differences in the way value added is created between small and large firms. In the largest 25% of firms, the capital contribution to value added is four times that of the smallest 25% of firms. Thirdly, efficiency follows an inverted ‘U’ shaped in firm age with the youngest (0–2 years) and oldest (> 9 years) firms being less productive than the middle 50% of firms. Fourthly, there are also huge industry sector variations in productivity. In particular, financial services appears to be the most productively efficient sector in the Australian economy and mining the least efficient.