Recent Submissions

  • Martial arts: the possible benefit that can be obtained during a period of lockdown

    Spring, Charles; University of Derby (Heriot Watt University, 2021-01-25)
    The following thought piece follows one individuals’ experience of being in lockdown in the United Kingdom and how the practice of martial arts assisted in this experience. Through the use of diary entries, their feelings and thoughts are expressed and how the bad ones of these are assisted through the practice and ability to focus on something other. There is a discussion that draws on other academic and authors perspectives, that evidence and support the thought pieces viewpoint. The piece concludes that practicing martial arts can help individuals through enabling them to have a focus and outlet to help cope with deeper emotional states caused by a situation such as lockdown.
  • Gender differences in theory of mind, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning in an offending and a matched non-offending population

    Spenser, Karin; Bull, Ray; Betts, Lucy; Winder, Belinda; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Sage, 2021-04-15)
    Previous research suggests that a lack of pro-social skills is characteristic of an offending personality. Two hundred male and female offenders and matched controls completed measures to assess: Theory of Mind, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning. Significant differences between the offenders and the control group, as well as between the male and female participants, were detected in theory of mind, empathic understanding and moral reasoning with offenders scoring lower than the control group, and with males scoring lower than females on most tests. The ability to assess Theory of Mind, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning, and subsequently to identify reduced ability, is not only useful for researchers but will also allow practitioners to tailor existing (or develop new) interventions specific to the needs of individuals. This could be particularly useful in terms of recidivism when applied to those involved in anti-social or offending behaviour.
  • A content analysis for government’s and hotels’ response to COVID-19 pandemic in Egypt

    Islam, Salem; Elshwesky, Zakaria; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Technology and Applied Sciences, Salalah, Oman; Alexandria University, Egypt; University of Derby (SAGE, 2021-04-13)
    Drawing on the Situational Crisis Communication theory (SCCT), this study recapitulates the initiatives, practices, and responses of the Egyptian government and chain-managed five-star hotels during the COVID-19 global health pandemic. Subjective and objective content analysis is employed in this study. Subjective content analysis is employed to examine newspapers, magazines, T.V channels, and official pages on Facebook to determine the initiatives and practices adopted by the Egyptian government. Objective content analysis is further used to determine the COVID-19 hospitality practices adopted by 22 chain-managed five-star hotels by examining their official websites. Thematic saturation was attained when observations and analyses exhibited no new themes. Findings indicated that the Egyptian government and chain-managed five-star hotels implemented a number of initiatives and practices focused on financial policies, health and hygiene, workforce and training, marketing, domestic tourism, booking flexibility, cancellation policies, community support, vacations, and contracts. This study contributes to crisis management research by being one of the first studies to explore governments and hotel operations practices and initiatives during the COVID-19 using Egypt as a case study. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications during and post the COVID-19.
  • Social customer relationship management: A customer perspective

    Dewnarain, Senika; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; University of Derby; Curtin Mauritius, Charles Telfair Campus, Mauritius; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Taylor & Francis, 2021-04-13)
    The availability of many social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online review sites such as Trip Advisor has led to the emergence of a new concept known as social customer relationship management (SCRM) or CRM 2.0. This is defined as a business strategy of engaging customers through social media with the goal of building trust and brand loyalty (Greenberg, 2010; Li et al., 2020; Rita & Moro, 2018), SCRM provides traditional customer relationship management for online customers by shifting the focus from a transactional outlook to one that centers on customer experiences (Dewnarain et al., 2019a; Sigala, 2018; Touni et al., 10 2020; Zhang et al., 2019).
  • WAF0042 - Inquiry: Women in the Armed Forces: From Recruitment to Civilian Life

    Spenser, Karin; Childs, Carrie; Adhikari, Joanna; University of Derby (UK Parliament, 2021-03-03)
    It is acknowledged that once military service is complete, personnel embark on a long metaphorical journey back to civilian life. Women military service leavers (WMSLs) are the fastest growing segment of the armed forces, and for them this transition can be even more traumatic than for their male counterparts. Whilst, it is recognised that to make this change seamless, they must have timely access to high quality women-centric services, it is suggested that such support is both limited and male-focused. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with eight WMSLs to gain a better understanding of the transition from military to civilian life. Thematic analysis was adopted to identify themes and subthemes. Two main themes were identified from the narratives – an environment of stress and long-term impact of service. Both themes are composed of several subthemes, which capture aspects of each main theme. Findings suggest the being in the military is stressful for all, but there is a perceived lack of support for WMSLs as they move into to civilian life. Their struggle with issues such as housing, employment and mental health was noted. Therefore, this research concludes that women need specific support during and after their military career.
  • Access to medicine in developing countries: instituting state obligation over corporate profit

    YUSUF, HAKEEM OLAYINKA; Omoteso, Kamil; University of Derby (Indiana University Press, 2021)
    This paper investigates the divergence between the objectives of the State in ensuring the right to health of citizens and the profit maximization objective of pharmaceutical corporations in relation to access to, and supply of, medicine. This is pertinent given the rising cost of medicines and unmet needs, particularly in developing countries. This paper analyses the contention between pharmaceutical corporations’ profit drive and the State’s welfare obligation. There is a need to bridge the gap between business and human rights and this can be achieved by combining the concepts of ‘business ethical responsibility’ and corporation’s contributions to ‘common good’ with the jurisprudence on the right to health. This is imperative in view of the impact of the business of pharmaceutical corporations on vulnerable populations particularly in, but not limited to, developing countries.
  • Worrying Times: The fear of crime and nostalgia

    Farrall, Stephen; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-02-24)
    As well as finding empirical relationships between victimisation, key socio-demographic variables, and various psychological and environmental processes, criminologists have long suspected that the feelings now identified, corralled together and labelled as ‘the fear of crime’ have roots in the wider shifts in the social, economic bases of society. In this paper, and using survey data from a nationally-representative sample of Britons aged over 16 (n = 5781), we explore the relationships between feelings of political and social nostalgia and the fear of crime. We find that nostalgia is indeed strongly related to crime fears, and, indeed, stronger even than variables such as victimisation, gender, and age (three of the frequently cited associates of fear). We go on to explore these relationships further in terms of different socio-economic classes, and relate feelings of nostalgia and fear to their recent (i.e. post-1945) historical trajectories.
  • Generating and sustaining value through guided tour experiences’ co-creation at heritage visitor attractions

    Azara, Iride; Bezova, Kamila; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis Group, 2021-02-11)
    Experience co-creation has been acknowledged as an important process to generate and sustain value. However, research in the arena of heritage visitor attractions remains limited. A qualitative cross-sectional design was used to assess UK heritage attractions providers’ engagement with guided tour experiences’ cocreation and the barriers faced in the adoption of this process. Findings from 11 interviews with visitor experience managers show most of the heritage attraction providers engage in processes of guided tour experience “co-production” rather than “co-creation”. Barriers include limited knowledge, and “knowhow” of value co-creation processes; financial, time, and human resource constraints. Importantly, findings show visitors’ satisfaction with current arrangements influence the type of tour offering. This study reveals the need to further investigate heritage audiences’ variations in preferences and suggests better sector integration in terms of knowledge sharing and best practice to fully explore the benefits and worth of value cocreation in this tourism sector.
  • An analysis of the impact of unconventional oil and gas activities on public health: New evidence across Oklahoma counties

    Apergis, Nicholas; Mustafa, Ghulam; Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; University of Texas at El Paso, USA; University of Derby; Queen Mary University of London, UK (Elsevier, 2021-03-17)
    The expansion of unconventional oil and gas development (UNGD) in the US has been highly controversial so far with no consensus on its health, economic, environmental, and social implications. This paper examines the effects of UNGD on the health profile of the population in the context of Oklahoma using a unique data set. To this end, the analysis assembles a panel data set including 76 counties of Oklahoma, spanning the period 1998-2017. The analysis estimates the long-run relationship between the health profile and its determinants using the Common Correlated Effects (CCE) method. The empirical setup allows for cross-sectional dependence and accounts for both observed and unobserved heterogeneity. The main findings provide strong evidence that UNGD activities have negative effects on human health-related outcomes across all counties in Oklahoma. Specifically, an increase in the number of (unconventional) wells has a positive impact on mortality rates, and incidences of cancer, cardiac, and respiratory diseases in communities in close spatial proximity, and a negative impact on life expectancy. These findings provide evidence that UNGD activities pose significant risks to the public health profile across the Oklahoma population. Such findings are expected to have substantial implications for the national debate on the regulation of UNGD.
  • Application of machine learning to predict visitors’ green behaviours in marine protected areas: evidence from Cyprus

    Rezapouraghdam, Hamed; Akshiq, Arash; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Cyprus University, Lefkosa, Turkey; Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, Krakow, Poland; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa (Taylor & Francis, 2021-03-10)
    Interpretive marine turtle tours in Cyprus yields an alluring ground to unfold the complex nature of pro-environmental behavior among travelers in nature-based destinations. Framing on Collins (2004) interaction ritual concept and the complexity theory, the current study proposes a configurational model and probes the interactional effect of visitors’ memorable experiences with environmental passion and their demographics to identify the causal recipes leading to travelers’ sustainable behaviors. Data was collected from tourists in the marine protected areas located in Cyprus. Such destinations are highly valuable not only for their function as an economic source for locals but also as a significant habitat for biodiversity preservation. Using fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA), this empirical study revealed that three recipes predict the high score level of visitors’ environmentally friendly behavior. Additionally, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) method was applied to train and test the patterns of visitors’ pro-environmental behavior in a machine learning environment to come up with a model which can best predict the outcome variable. The unprecedented implications on the use of technology to simulate and encourage pro-environmental behaviors in sensitive protected areas are discussed accordingly.
  • Coal today, gone tomorrow: How jobs were replaced with prison places

    Jones, Phil Mike; Gray, Emily; Farrall, Stephen; University of Derby (Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, 2021-01-29)
  • Corporate social responsibility in the oil and gas industry in Nigeria: the case for a legalised framework

    Ekhator, Eghosa; Iyiola-Omisore, Ibukun; University of Derby; University of Leeds (Springer, 2021-01-26)
    This chapter focuses on the extant corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in the oil and gas industry in Nigeria. The oil and gas industry has been beset by a lot of problems not limited to violence, kidnappings, eco-terrorism, and maladministration amongst others. One of the strategies of curing or mitigating these inherent problems in the oil and gas sector is the use of CSR initiatives by many oil multinational corporations (MNCs) operating in Nigeria. Notwithstanding that the majority of CSR initiatives in the oil and gas sector in Nigeria are voluntary, this chapter avers that CSR initiatives should be made mandatory by the Nigerian government. Furthermore, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) should play an integral role in the implementation of any legalised framework on CSR that will be developed in the country. This chapter suggests that a CSR law should be developed specifically for the oil and gas industry to mitigate the negative externalities arising from the activities of oil MNCs in the Niger Delta region of the country
  • Desistance: A utopian perspective

    Patton, David; Farrall, Stephen; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-02-22)
    The written diaries of forty-three adult male respondents from a prison sample that had participated in a restorative justice intervention reveal a nuanced and dynamic process of desistance via their hopes and pains of anticipated desistance at the micro, meso and macro level. A utopian reading of the respondents’ hopes and pains of desistance is developed which reveal that their diaries express a utopian vision that is not just personal, but also inherently political, radical, collective and transformative. Their pains of desistance on the other hand, reveal a critique and condemnation of the current societal and structural apparatus. The necessity for radical and collective change is clear, if desisters and society are to reach their full potential.
  • Antecedents and outcomes of resident empowerment through tourism

    Aleshinloye, Kayode; Woosnam, Kyle; Tasci, Asli; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Central Florida; University of Georiga, Athens, Greece; University of Derby (SAGE, 2021-02-17)
    Even though empowerment is a frequently mentioned keyword in resident attitude studies, the relationship network of this concept is rather vague. It is critical to understand the factors that influence empowerment, and factors that empowerment influences in return. Therefore, the current study modeled residents’ data from the top tourism destination in the U.S.—Orlando, Florida. Data from 415 residents were analyzed using Partial Least Squares - Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) on SmartPLS to test the effects of residents’ involvement and economic benefits from tourism on their psychological, social and political empowerment, and thus quality of life and ultimately, place attachment. Findings revealed that psychological empowerment is the most significant dimension of resident empowerment influencing both place dependence and place identity, suggesting that residents hold special values for their place. Managerial and theoretical implications, along with limitations (in light of the project occurring pre-COVID-19) and future research opportunities are discussed. Keywords: Resident attitudes, empowerment, place attachment, quality of life, PLS
  • NGO accountability on environmentalism: a literature review of relevant issues and themes

    Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Yekini, Kemi, C; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing, 2021-01-04)
    This chapter, which is in themes, starts with a survey of the rise of environmentalism for the purpose of sustainability. It then evaluates the roles of nongovernmental organisations' (NGOs') self-regulation and government regulation on the need for accountability that ensures sustainability. NGOs' accountability is a way of making sure that stakeholders' social, environmental and economic sustainability are protected and rigorously evaluated. This chapter further examines what the enduring mechanisms should be if true accountability, which leads to sustainability, will be achieved to suggest a holistic accountability that involves downward and upward accountability. In doing so, this chapter utilised the identified five mechanisms that ensure the continuity of world sustainability, which is prima-facie, the objective of funders/donors, beneficiaries/stakeholders and the NGO's loop.
  • An empirical study on the building blocks of resilience in British food supply chains in case of Brexit

    Liravi, Pouria; Polychronakis, Yiannis; Fassam, Liam; University of Derby; University of Salford; University of Northampton (2020-12)
    In the wake of Britain’s referendum results, which will lead to the UK leaving the EU, the pressures on British food supply chains to obtain safe and secure sources of supply has increased. This study aims to investigate “resilience” as a form of capability for risk mitigation within food supply chains. To achieve this aim, three major food companies, that have an active presence in British food supply chains, have contributed to this study. This empirical research adapted a multiple case study approach and used qualitative data to interpret answers to the research questions. Semi-structured interview questions were the principal data collection method. To increase the credibility and validity of the research findings, observational studies and document archival reviews were conducted and their findings were triangulated against the findings of interview responses. This research drew a theoretical framework for resilient food supply chains. The buying power and buying behaviour of large companies can not only affect their direct and indirect partners in supply chains, but also affect other companies, that are not in any supply chain relationship with the organisation. None-availability of products due to various external, internal factors can effectively distort food supply chains and jeopardise the flow of activities of companies. Financial strength of supply chain partners is considered as an essential criterion for entering business relationships, especially for the transport and logistics companies within the food supply chains. The ease of communication, amongst various levels of staff members of organisations, which consequently leads to a resilient supply chain. The capabilities of a procurement department in enabling resilience in food supply chains was highlighted and it was claimed that the extent of development of this role is closely related to the ability of the company, to fulfil its orders in the time of Brexit.
  • Losing the discursive battle but winning the ideological war: who holds Thatcherite values now?

    Farrall, Stephen; Gray, Emily; Jones, Philip Mike; Hay, Colin; University of Derby; Sciences Po, Center for European Studies and Comparative Politics, Paris, France (Sage, 2021-02-02)
    In what ways, if at all, do past ideologies shape the values of subsequent generations of citizens? Are public attitudes in one period shaped by the discourses and constructions of an earlier generation of political leaders? Using Thatcherism – one variant of the political New Right of the 1980s – as the object of our enquiries, this paper explores the extent to which an attitudinal legacy is detectable amongst the citizens of the UK some 40 years after Margaret Thatcher first became Prime Minister. Our paper, drawing on survey data collected in early 2019 (n = 5,781), finds that younger generations express and seemingly embrace key tenets of her and her governments’ philosophies. Yet at the same time, they are keen to describe her government’s policies as having ‘gone too far’. Our contribution throws further light on the complex and often covert character of attitudinal legacies. One reading of the data suggests that younger generations do not attribute the broadly Thatcherite values that they hold to Thatcher or Thatcherism since they were socialised politically after such values had become normalised.
  • Audit committee and audit quality: An empirical analysis considering industry expertise, legal expertise and gender diversity

    Alhababsah, Salem; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-01-20)
    The extant literature and corporate governance regulations suffer from a tight focus on audit committee (AC) financial expertise as a mean of improving the AC’s oversight role. However, there is a lack of evidence about other kinds of expertise that might be important for AC effectiveness which could contribute to the quality of financial statements. This study examines whether AC industry expertise and AC legal expertise have an impact on audit quality in a developing country (Jordan). Furthermore, mixed and inconsistent findings regarding the role played by female directors and the peculiarity of the Jordanian context creates a motive to examine the effect of AC gender diversity on audit quality. By utilizing 1,035 firm-year observations, using two proxies to capture audit quality, and employing different estimation methods, this study highlights the importance of AC industry expertise in ensuring high audit quality. AC legal expertise and AC gender diversity have no significant effect on audit quality. This study offers a valuable contribution to the literature, and also has implications for policy-makers in Jordan and other countries with similar institutional environments to consider for future regulatory reform.
  • Accessibility to spa experiences

    Michopoulou, Eleni; Hilton, Sarah J.; University of Derby (IGI Global, 2021-01)
    This chapter aims to highlight and raise awareness of the previously unknown barriers currently faced by wheelchair using consumers in the spa industry and the implications of these barriers for consumer and industry alike. Existing research on accessibility within this specific environment is extremely limited (if any). This study shows that access to accurate information is a key issue, a key barrier to participation and not only for those who have not visited a spa before. Gaining information pre visit in tourism is increasingly done online and there is the opportunity to use technologies and especially websites and social media platforms to help provide this information. The chapter also illustrates the potential for health and greater mental and social wellbeing the spa industry and the wider wellness tourism industry have for wheelchair users and how they could mutually benefit each other, as well as further promoting the case for barrier free accessible tourism and leisure opportunities.

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