Recent Submissions

  • Built environment attributes and crime: an automated machine learning approach

    Dakin, Kyle; Parkinson, Simon; Saad, Kahn; Monchuck, Leanne; Pease, Ken; University of Huddersfield; University of Derby (BMC, 2020-07-08)
    This paper presents the development of an automated machine learning approach to gain an understanding of the built environment and its relationship to crime. This involves the automatic capture of street-level photographs using Google Street View (GSV), followed by the use of supervised machine learning techniques (specifically image feature recognition) to recognise features of the built environment. In this exploratory proof-of-concept work, 8 key features (building, door, fence, streetlight, tree, window, hedge, and garage) are considered and a worked case-study is demonstrated for a small geographical area (8300 square kilometres) in Northern England. A total of 60,100 images were automatically collected and analysed across the area where 5288 crime incidents were reported over a twelve- month period. Dependency between features and crime incidents are measured; however, no strong correlation has been identified. This is unsurprisingly considering the high number of crime incidents in a small geographic region (8300 square kilometres), resulting in an overlap between specific features and multiple crime incidents. Further- more, due to the unknown precise location of crime instances, an approximation technique is developed to survey a crime’s local proximity. Despite the absence of a strong correlation, this paper presents a first-of-a-kind cross-disci- pline approach to attempt and use computation techniques to produce new empirical knowledge. There are many avenues of future research in this fertile and important area.
  • Beauty and elegance: value co-creation in cosmetic surgery tourism

    Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (SAGE Publications, 2020-06-16)
    This study presents an emerging trend in medical tourism, cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore tourists’ perceptions of CST for medical service quality as an antecedent to tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit, which is underexplored in CST. This study examines the mediating role of value co-creation in influencing behaviors of CST-seeking tourists to experience a better quality of life. Using a sample drawn from 279 tourists, comprised of Australian, Japanese, and Chinese nationalities at two international airports in China, findings show that perceived medical service quality positively influences tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit directly and through the mediating role of value co-creation across the three nationalities. CST-seeking tourists’ inputs in value co-creation may positively influence their behaviors, which are vital antecedents to promoting CST business. Implications for future research are discussed.
  • Exploring informal weak tie bonded social networks through a multi-level theoretical lens

    Weir, David; Ali, Sa'ad; York St John's University; University of Derby (2020-07-03)
    In this paper we are chiefly concerned with a desired focus on “co-evolution of networks and organizational attributes, such as innovation introduce a third type of approach to network dynamics that deals with existing networks that are self-regulating, , self-balancing, tend to be self-reproducing and can handle issues of uncertainty and complexity: for instance informal social networks of the type covered Wasta in the Arab Middle East ,Guanxi in the Chinese world and Blat in Russia (Ali and Weir, 2019). In Arab countries “Wasta” describes networks rooted in family and kinship ties, used to bypass formal bureaucratic procedures easing the process of achieving a goal through connections (Cunningham and Sarayrah, 1993; Hutchings and Weir, 2006a; Hutchings and Weir, 2006b; Smith et al., 2012). Wasta is also known as Ma’arifa or Piston, in North African nations such as Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco (Iles, 2012; Smith et al., 2012b). While these phenomena have been increasingly written about over the past decade (Smith et al., 2012a; Smith et al., 2012b; Velez-Calle et al., 2015; Horak and Taube, 2016; Weir et al., 2016; Ali and Weir, 2019), the emphasis of Western researchers has tended to be critical even dismissive characterising these phenomena as at best stages in the evolution of developing business systems of interest only in the Third World of underdeveloped societies (Loewe et al., 2008) or more pejoratively as inadequate or deviant versions of other approaches to Network Dynamics that derive from the received wisdoms of the classical approaches central to liberal market, rational economic actor paradigms at the heart of western business analysis. The results of these framings are a consensual depiction in some writings of Wasta processes as “favouritism”, “pull”, “corruption” and similar negative portrayals (Ali, 2016; Ali, Weir et al., 2016; Ali and Weir, 2019). The default possibility that these negative emergences are also to be found in other cultures for example of the USA, Europe and the UK tends not to be seriously examined as nor does the implication that the actual experienced present in all its imperfectabilities may be a safer place to start the analysis than deductive essays based on a perfect but unattainable social order as represented by the mainstream rational actor framings. As such, this paper focuses on Wasta as an case study to explore how studying such informal social networks using a multi theoretical lens can expand our understanding of this phenomena and informal social networks in general enabling us to achieve a holistic view of the network linking the structural aspects with the actors of the network which this track calls for.
  • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

    Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
    Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
  • Turning motivation into action: A strategic orientation model for green supply chain management

    Liu, Shumin; Eweje, Gabriel; He, Qile; Lin, Zhibin; Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, China; Massey University, New Zealand; University of Derby, United Kingdom; Durham University, United Kingdom (Wiley, 2020-07-03)
    This study examines the key motivations for a firm to adopt green supply chain management (GSCM) strategic orientation, and the mechanisms that subsequently influence GSCM practices. Three components of GSCM orientation were examined, i.e. strategic emphasis, management support, and resource commitment. Data were collected from a sample of 296 manufacturing firms in China. The results indicate that the most important motivation is environmental concern, followed by customer requirements, cost saving and competitive pressure, while legal requirements were not a significant factor. The results confirm that strategic orientation plays mediating role between motivations and the actual practices. Within the three components of strategic orientation, resource commitment and strategic emphasis have stronger direct impact on practices, whereas the effect of management support on GSCM practices is indirect through resource commitment. This study contributes to the literature by clarifying the key role of strategic orientation in turning GSCM motivations into actions.
  • Improving pofessional observers’ veracity judgements by tactical interviewing

    Sandham, Alex; Dando, Coral; Bull, Ray; Ormerod, Tom; University of Gloucestershire; University of Westminster; University of Derby; University of Sussex (Springer, 2020-06-25)
    Understanding whether a person of interest is being truthful during an investigative interview is a constant challenge and is of concern to numerous criminal justice professionals, most of whom are not involved in conducting the interview itself. Here we investigated police observers’ veracity detection performance having viewed interviews with truthtellers and deceivers using either the Tactical Use of Evidence (TUE), Strategic Use of Evidence (TUE) or a Control technique. Thirty serving police officers participated as post interview observers and each viewed 12 interviews in a counterbalanced order. Immediately post each interview each officer made a veracity judgment. Overall, untrained police observers were significantly more accurate (68%) when making veracity judgments post TUE interviews whereas for both SUE and Control performance was around chance (51% and 48%, respectively). Veracity performance for liars and truthtellers revealed a similar pattern of results (67% liars; 70% truthtellers) in the TUE condition. These results lend further support to the psychological literature highlighting the importance of how and when to reveal evidence or any other relevant event information during an investigative interview for ‘outing’ deceivers as well as allowing truthtellers early opportunities to evidence their innocence.
  • Understanding radicalisation: issues for practitioners, communities and the state

    Henry, Philip M.; University of Derby (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)
  • Wasta: Advancing a holistic model to bridge the micro-macro divide

    Ali, Sa'ad; Weir, David; University of Derby; York St John's University (Cambridge University Press, 2020)
    This paper offers a synthesis of understandings of Wasta, seen as a form of social network prevalent in the Arab Middle East. Whilst there has been increasing interest in this practice, research remains fragmented and has been criticised for its limited theoretical rigor. To address this issue, a systematic review of peer-reviewed journal articles exploring Wasta published between 1993 and 2019 was conducted. The authors analysed the identified papers according to the theoretical lens from which Wasta was viewed, creating a bridge between a theoretical focus on the macro aspect of Wasta and an alternative focus on its micro aspects, leading to the development of a holistic model of Wasta. The model also helps us to understand the complexity of Wasta, both as the network itself and as the social ties that exist among its members, and sheds light on the complex nature of the role and interactions of the Waseet. The findings respond to calls for more holistic and inclusive research to inform social networks research and bridge the micro–macro divide. The paper offers recommendations to future researchers to build on the holistic and emic approach to Wasta research adopted here.
  • Thermal and mineral springs

    Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
    Water and spa are ubiquitous geographically and culturally, but the relationship between that water and bathing rituals has led directly and indirectly to the organic growth of many of today’s spa products. The aim of this chapter is to explore the use of thermal and mineral waters for bathing, and it begins with a review of the origins, cultural and religious associations of bathing rituals. The current industry suggests that the approaches to hot spring bathing are broadly defined by three main categories: Relaxation and connection with the environment, as seen in Asian cultures; Health based and spiritual treatments, largely seen in European cultures; Religious connections, evident in Indian and indigenous cultures. This categorisation creates a debate within the industry as to whether globalisation fosters a blurring of these distinctions. Questions that result from this are: Is connection to the environment evident in cultures other than Asia? Where else are spiritual treatments seen other than in Europe? Do religious connections exist outside of indigenous cultures? The chapter also provides a historical illustration, drawing on examples of thermal and mineral spas from different continents, from the ancient Greek and Roman baths, the glamorous European spa resorts, to the onsen of Japan and hot springs of North America. The context is exampled in size and shape where Davidson (cited in Global Spa and Wellness Summit, 2013) and the Global Wellness Institute (GWI) (2014) concur in estimating that the global market is now worth over fifty billion US dollars. Furthermore, this market. growth is driven by new manifestations, such as the rejuvenation of the Eastern European industry based around emerging tourism destinations. For example the Hungarian resort of Heviz, developments such as the Crescent Hotel in Buxton, England and in North and Sub-Saharan Africa. The efficacy of bathing in thermal and mineral waters is then discussed as is the relationship to the notion of ‘existential authenticity’.
  • Selling the total spa product

    Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
    Retail sales can contribute significantly to a spa’s revenue, however, many spas do not realise their full retail potential. This chapter presents strategies to maximise retail sales, including: brand selection, brand ambassadors, incentives, training, retail design and visual merchandising to provide a tool kit for success. Consideration is also given to the importance of integrating retail throughout the entire customer journey. A case study is presented at the end of the chapter to encourage the application of knowledge. Selling experiences is seen as the principal function of a spa (Wuttle and Cohen, 2008), nevertheless, retail and other sales such as up-selling and link selling can all make significant contributions to a spa’s revenue. In exploring approaches to selling, the benefits of, and barriers to, selling are presented as well as strategies to maximise sales. The chapter is therefore essentially a more practically based one, but needs to be read in conjunction with the chapters on consumer behaviour, guest service and journey and marketing spas.
  • Supporting student transition to higher education through the application of a model of wellness

    Buxton, Louise; Baker, Lorraine; Rosamond, Victoria; Ebdon, Yvonne; University of Derby (2018-07-02)
  • Social media in politics – simple aggregator or the emerging Ministry of truth

    Amoncar, Nihar; Deacon, Jonathan; University of South Wales (Academy of Marketing, 2017-07-06)
    Ravi and Vasundara (2015) posit that Social Networking Sites (SNS) like Twitter and Facebook have become great tools for the reluctant young Indians to actively engage in discussions concerning Political, Economic and Social issues. Within the last decade, authors have identified the competitive advantage SNS can offer in shaping Political discourse in a country as Simba (2009) highlights that beside Obama’s ability of public speaking and inspiring people, his use of Social media and Internet to engage voters provided him with the support that most of other candidates never saw. On the other hand, confronted by an increasingly cynical and distrustful electorate (Whiteley et al., 2016), political parties and candidates have now started to adopt digital communication tools as a means to engage with publics. Consistent with Whiteley’s assertion, several international publications earmarked the 2014 Indian general elections as “India’s first social media elections” (Pandey, 2015). Over 500 million voters turned up to exercise their right in the world’s largest democracy which also recorded a record voter turnout of 66.38% beating the previous record on 1984 polls, results showed that the BJP won the biggest victory by any party for 30 years (BBCnews.com, 2014). Authors such as Sambandan (2014) and Ravi and Vasundara (2015) have explored and discussed the approach of Indian Prime Minister Modi and his party i.e. Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in the use of social media for communication, these studies highlight the communication initiated from the Political party/Government end. However, this paper explores the role of Citizen initiated discussion forum on Facebook and the role they play within the national Political dialogue. The paper hence presents literature that explains how the factors that have caused social media to emerge as a tool of choice in political dialogue between Government/Party and the citizens; but more importantly the paper explores the role of region-centric Facebook based discussion forum in the political dialogue in order to gain clarity over ‘why’ social media is emerging as an alternate medium of political dialogue to Mainstream Media (MSM), what is the rationale behind social media forums like Goa+ emerging? The paper conducts a netnographic study using Administrators and Moderators of Goa+, a Facebook based Political discussion forum originating in Goa, India and consisting of over 76, 680 members.
  • Plastics and the spa industry

    Buxton, Louise; Stockdale, Isobel; University of Derby (2019-05-08)
  • What can a graduate do for you?

    Buxton, Louise; Baker, Lorraine; University of Derby (2018-05-21)
  • Supporting student transition to higher education through the application of a model of wellness

    Buxton, Louise; Kruzikaite, Roberta; University of Derby (2018-05-27)
  • Steps forward: the journey of wellness education in the UK

    Buxton, Louise; Spring, Charles; University of Derby (2018-06-19)
  • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

    Buxton, Louise; Loynes, Tony; Batchelor, Lauren; University of Derby (2018-06-28)

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