Recent Submissions

  • Wasta in Jordanian banking: An emic approach to a culture-specific concept of social networking and its power-implications

    Ali, Sa’ad; Weir, David; University of Worcester (Routledge, 2019-11-07)
    This chapter reviews the background and cultural implications of wasta business networking in the Jordanian banking sector. The chapter starts with exploring this practice, its origin and its use in Jordanian society and business context, highlighting how wasta is often viewed with an etic approach by its researchers and related to concepts such as corruption and favouritism. The wider context of wasta in Jordan is explored and wasta is viewed with an emic approach, drawing on insights from 17 interviews in the case of Jordanian banking sector. A more balanced exploration of wasta is offered, drawing on the role of identity and power in wasta practice and highlighting its possible benefits and drawbacks in employee selection. Reflexive considerations of using wasta to research wasta and the authors’ insider/outsider statuses are discussed and recommendations to students, researchers and practitioners are offered.
  • Beyond the policy rhetoric: the limitations of gender mainstreaming in South Korea relating to women and childcare

    Lee, Sung-Hee; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2019-12-26)
    This article examines the limitations of the gender mainstreaming discourse regarding the issue of childcare by women in South Korea, an area of responsibility that was transferred from the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW) to the Ministry of Gender Equality (MGE)1 in 2003. Through employing a discursive institutionalism approach, this article articulates that whilst the gender mainstreaming discourse has been interpreted at the surface level of politics, it has been formulated differently behind the scenes due to various policy interests. I argue that the discourse has remained at the level of superficial political rhetoric with underdeveloped understanding about the relationship between childcare and gender, thus retaining a stereotypical view of women as caregivers.
  • Developing graduate entrepreneurs: exploring the experiences of university entrepreneurs in residence

    Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Rajasinghe, Duminda; University of Derby; University of Northampton (Nottingham Business School & Academy of Human Resource Development, 2019-06)
    This study aims to explore the coaching experience of entrepreneurs in residence in the UK higher education institutions. ‘The entrepreneurs in residence’ is a relatively new intervention. The individuals who hold these positions appear to claim that they coach the potential entrepreneurs to facilitate to acquire required skills to become successful entrepreneurs. However, this is a relatively under-researched area both within coaching and enterprise/entrepreneurship education. Therefore, we aim to explore individual experience of entrepreneurs in residence (provider of the service) and the students' (receiver) perspectives to develop a deeper understanding of how entrepreneurs in residence supports students to gain required understanding, skills and knowledge to become successful entrepreneurs in future. We ask: How entrepreneurs in residence make sense of their intervention / experience in coaching practice? Therefore, our main aim is to explore entrepreneurs in residences’ experience to address the previously highlighted research and practice gap. The student perspectives are used to develop additional understanding of entrepreneurs in residences’ sense-making. Considering the subjective and contextual nature of the study, and its interest in human experience and hermeneutics, the study is conducted adopting Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) as the research methodology. This is a working paper, therefore, there is no empirical data collected but the study aims to contribute to develop understanding of the role of entrepreneurs in residence in the UK universities, i.e. their role in developing future entrepreneurs. This study has potential in influencing policy while informing practice and the literature.
  • Are the dominant teaching theories in higher education adequate to underpin teaching practices in enterprise and entrepreneurship context?

    Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Mulholland, Gary; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-11-08)
    It can be comprehended that the models and theories which are currently used to reinforce teaching depict the education practices of transmitting knowledge from teacher to students, which is more traditional, linear, input-output construction of teaching that has dominated adult education for decades including the last half century. As numerous studies (e.g. QAA, 2018) emphasizes that both the needs of learner and learning in enterprise and entrepreneurship education (EEE) context is different from other disciplines and mainstream higher education (HE). This requires further development of teaching methods and practices that can encourage the aspirations of the learner in this particular education setting. When investigating the theories and approaches that are used to examine teaching in HE, the relevance and adequacy of them to review teaching practices in this 21st century and EEE context is a question. Thus, the need of new theoretical models and frameworks can be clearly observed. For example, to investigate teacher’s role in EEE setting, there is a need of adopting more context specific, individual-focused research methods. When the recent outcomes associated with the UK higher education are taken into account, there is an emerging key debate; i.e. are universities actually turning off potential entrepreneurs. Whether these outcomes are due to teaching, learning environment or other activities within universities, is still largely a question, hence requires further research to find answers.
  • South Africa's foreign policy and evolving role conceptions: a crisis of international identity

    Masters, Lesley; Schiavon, Jorge; University of Derby (Peter Lang, 2019-10-31)
    South Africa’s transition to democracy in 1994 saw a substantial shift in the perceived international role for South Africa, from a position in defence of the domestic policy of apartheid, to the outwards orientated approach of universalism. The challenge, as this section argues, is that in the South African context the national role conception, or the image of what role the country should play in international relations, has failed to ‘settle’ despite continuity of foreign policy on paper. As Mills (1997) argues, the search for a new ‘image’ has seen Pretoria ‘leaning all over the place’ on the international stage. The result has been perceptible challenges in reconciling foreign policy ambitions and ideals with implementation in practice; where confusion around what role to adopt has made it difficult to predict the country’s international actions.
  • Quantitative impacts of mandatory integrated reporting

    Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Emerald, 2019-12-02)
    This paper examines the impact of the 2011 mandatory introduction of integrated reporting (IR) on the financial performance, risk and institutional shareholding of listed companies in South Africa to assess whether there is a benefit to IR and which may encourage greater adoption of it globally. It contrasts the results with two other African stock exchanges (Nigeria and Egypt with no mandatory IR) and examines whether IR quality also has an impact on these and on Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) disclosure scores. A series of multivariate ordinary least squares regressions were estimated on a range of financial, risk, institutional and ESG data from firms on the three African stock exchanges, between 2006-2015. Financial performance and risk in South African firms appear to have decreased since the start of mandatory reporting, but institutional shareholding has increased. The production of higher quality reports is associated with decreased financial performance and risk, higher institutional shareholding and increased ESG scores. This study is first to test the quantitative effects of IR and IR quality on a broad range of financial performance and risk measures and the level of institutional shareholding. It also adds to the literature by assessing how the quality of IR can impact the ESG scoring of the business. Hence this study is of interest to firms looking to adopt IR for its benefits and to regulatory bodies considering the mandatory adoption of IR in support of achievement of national social and environmental goals.
  • Critical review on social marketing planning approaches

    Akbar, M Bilal; French, Jeff; Lawson, Alison; University of Derby; Strategic Social Marketing (Westburn Publishers, 2019-11-13)
    This paper presents the first attempt to map and critically review existing social marketing planning approaches. The discussion highlights that existing social marketing planning approaches have moved on from older product-driven models towards a more customer/citizen-oriented, stakeholder engagement and value creation narrative. There is also a growing connection between social marketing planning approaches and theories from other disciplines. This recognises that a simple push marketing strategy, which was the working principle of many early social marketing-planning approaches, is not often effective for contemporary social marketing practice. Effective social marketing planning requires a greater emphasis on new social marketing principles derived from the new global consensus social marketing definition such as more citizen focus, sustainable outcomes, and ethical practice. Thus, highlighting a need for more comprehensive social marketing planning approaches with a better understanding of recent theory development of social marketing as a field in order to be relatable and efficient. The review sets out some original thinking about how planning in the field of social marketing can be strengthened through a more inclusive adoption of both system thinking analysis and integration with other fields of theory and practice that are seeking to influence behaviour for social good. This review is exploratory in nature and evaluates only 14 social marketing planning approaches; more social marketing approached exist and could be considered in further reviews.
  • The longitudinal association between resting heart rate and psychopathic traits from a normative personality perspective

    Kavish, Nicholas; Bergstrøm, Henriette; Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Sam Houston University; University of Derby; The University of Texas at Dallas; University of Cambridge; University of Mississippi (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-10-23)
    A large body of research has accumulated investigating the possibility of an association between resting heart rate and psychopathic traits, with meta-analysis suggesting a modest, negative association. Some recent research suggests that prior findings of an association between heart rate and psychopathy may be influenced by inclusion of antisocial behavior in the assessment of psychopathic traits. The current study explores this possibility in a longitudinal sample of British males by comparing resting heart rate at age 18 to psychopathy assessed from a Five Factor Model perspective and from the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV) at age 48. Our psychopathic personality scale, created using the Big Five Inventory (BFI), was significantly correlated with the PCL:SV and was most related to the antisocial factor. In correlation analyses, resting heart rate at age 18 was not significantly related to BFI psychopathy, but was positively related to BFI Openness and Conscientiousness, and these associations held up after controlling for childhood SES, BMI at 18, and whether the participant smoked during the age 18 assessment. Additional analyses controlling for smoking status were conducted to address the biasing effect of smoking on heart rate during the age 18 assessment and a significant, albeit weak, negative association between resting heart rate and BFI psychopathy emerged. Future research should replicate these results using other normative personality approaches to assess psychopathic traits.
  • Staff reports of bullying and intervention strategies in Croatian care and correctional institutions for youth

    Sekol, Ivana; Farrington, David; Department of Criminology and Social Sciences, University of Derby; University of Cambridge (Sage, 2020-10-21)
    This study compares staff reports of bullying amongst institutionalized youth with residents’ own self-reported prevalence of bullying and victimization collected in the previous study (hereafter the Self-Report Study on Bullying in Croatian Residential Care (SSBCRC)) and staff reports of reduction strategies are compared with evidence-based proposed policy solutions arising from residents’ reports. The study also compares reduction strategies used by staff with evidence-based proposed policy solutions arising from residents’ reports arising from the SSBCRC. One hundred and forty staff from 20 Croatian youth facilities completed an anonymous questionnaire. The results revealed that staff estimates of the prevalence of bullying and victimization were significantly lower than resident reports. Staff were better aware of the prevalence of certain types of bullying, but they held stereotypical views of bullies and victims and had difficulties in recognizing the true times and places of bullying. Staff described their anti-bullying policies as being predominantly reactive, rather than proactive and evidence-based. It is concluded that more effort needs to be made in order to change the current anti-bullying policies used by staff.
  • Do parents have a right to determine where a child patient dies?

    Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Trivent Publishing, 2019-08)
    This chapter will explore whether parents have the legal right to take their gravely ill child home to die in peace surrounded by family. Public anger surrounding the recent cases of Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans suggests that it is morally wrong to deprive parents of this final wish when medical treatment is futile and travel abroad for treatment has been ruled out. The judgments of Judge Francis (Gard) and Lady Justice King (Re C) will be examined to reveal the legal avenues available to parents of gravely ill children and whether their final wish to take their child home should be afforded more weight in futile cases.
  • Social reproduction strategies: Understanding compound inequality in the intergenerational transfer of capital, assets and resources

    Nunn, Alexander; Tepe-Belfrage, Daniela; University of Derby; University of Liverpool (SAGE, 2019-10-30)
    This paper focuses on the way that households respond to ‘global pressures’ by adapting their social reproduction strategies (SRS). We understand SRS to encapsulate the more or less consciously developed day-to-day and inter-generational responses to the social conditions that households confront and their own motivations and aspirations for the future. Yet, due to a range of extant inequalities of accumulated and dynamic resources – some of which are material and some of which are at once ethereal and embodied in the concrete labouring capacities of individuals – we argue that SRS and capacities to pursue them differ widely. Differences are conditioned by positionality, access to information and the construction of ‘economic imaginaries’ as well as material resources. By looking at these different expressions of SRS we highlight how they reinforce macro-scale socio-economic pressures, creating what we term ‘compound inequality’ into the future. Compound inequalities result from different behavioural responses to socio-economic conditions, inequality and (perceived or real) insecurity, which have the potential to exaggerate inequality and insecurity into the future. Inequalities do not just arise from formal economic markets then but also from the realm of social reproduction.
  • Examination of information load following IFRS adoption in an emerging market: evidence from Nigeria.

    Okwuosa I; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Oyemade B; Coventry University (Sep-17)
    No abstract
  • Corporate social responsibility performance and tax aggressiveness

    Chijoke-Mgbame, M.A; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Kemi, Y.C; Mgbame, C.O; Coventry University (Academic Journals, 30/09/2017)
    This study investigated the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance on tax aggressiveness of listed firms in Nigeria. A cross-sectional research design was utilized for the study, and data were collected from the published annual reports. Using a sample of 50 companies for the period of 2007 to 2013, the findings of the study reveal that there is a negative relationship between CSR performance and tax aggressiveness in Nigeria. A significant relationship was also found between firm size and tax aggressiveness, though with mixed positive and negative results. In addition, the results reveal a negative and significant relationship between firm performance and tax aggressiveness, and the extent of tax aggressiveness is reinforcing. It can be concluded that firms are more or less likely to engage in tax aggressiveness depending on their CSR standpoints and dimension and other corporate characteristics. It is recommended that more attention should be given by tax administrations to understand conditions where tax aggressiveness is more likely and measures should be put in place to combat it.
  • An Evaluation of Management Perspectives of Sustainability Reporting In The Nigerian Oil Industry.

    Uzonwanne, G; Yekini, K; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; tobo, P; Coventry University (CCSE, 2014)
    This article investigates the perspectives of managers involved in sustainability reporting in the Nigerian oil industry. The article adopts a survey methodology in its approach to conduct this investigation. The survey employed a structured interview to investigate five themes built around the motivation for sustainability reporting within these organizations, hierarchical responsibility for sustainability reporting, the organizations objectives relative to the welfare of the people within the communities it operates in, policies in place to rejuvenate the damaged environment resulting from it’s operations and finally how sufficient in monetary terms is the company’s effort to wipe out its operational footprint. The data gathered was analysed qualitatively under these various themes. The general view emerging amongst the vast majority of the managers interviewed was that oil companies operating within the region have a key social responsibility and disclosure role to play but that it remains the role of the Nigerian Federal Government to provide the institutional framework around which the development of the region is to be hinged. Research Implications: More research is required in the area of CSR and CSD in developing/emerging markets to understand the link between weak institutional frameworks and voluntary CSR and CSD. This article contributes to CSR and CSD literature in broad terms and in specific terms to the literature on sustainable operations in developing/emerging markets. The originality is based on the fact that it explores manager’s perspectives in a developing/emerging market.
  • The impact of mergers and acquisitions on shareholders’ wealth: evidence from Nigeria

    Abeleje, R; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University (Scottish Group, 2014)
    This research paper seeks to validate the controversial post-merger synergy in Nigerian context. According to theory, mergers and acquisition should enhance synergistic effect to the advantage of the shareholders. This paper evaluates whether post-acquisition value attributable to shareholders of Nigerian banks surpasses that of the pre-acquisition period. The paper uses a fifteen year secondary data of five judgementally selected banks to analyse and compare pre-acquisition and post-acquisition shareholders‟ value in a balanced manner. The measurement index of shareholders' wealth is a modified version of the ROE (Return on Equity). SPSS version 20 and Excel spread sheet was also used to get the R, R2 ,T-test and F-test. It was discovered that shareholders' fund strongly influenced the profitability of the Nigerian banks but value to shareholders in the post-acquisition period is lower compared to the pre-acquisition period. Managers of Nigerian banks should not rest on the oars of government initiatives. They should be proactive in their operation as far as profitability is concerned. This research is the first of its kind to make a balanced and up to date comparison of pre-and post M&A period (ie 7yrs pre-merger & 7yrs post-merger). The index of measurement is modified ROE that incorporates only what relate directly to shareholders alone.
  • Impact of board independence on the quality of community disclosures in annual reports.

    Yekini, K.C; Adelopo, I; Andrikopoulos, P; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University (Taylor and Francis, 27/02/2019)
    This study investigates the link between board independence and the quality of community disclosures in annual reports. Using content analysis and a panel dataset from UK FTSE 350 companies the results indicate a statistically significant relationship between board independence, as measured by the proportion of nonexecutive directors, and the quality of community disclosures, while holding constant other corporate governance and firm specific variables. The study indicates that companies with more non-executive directors are likely to disclose higher quality information on their community activities than others. This finding offers important insights to policy makers who are interested in achieving optimal board composition and furthers our understanding of the firm's interaction with its corporate and extended environment through high-quality disclosures. The originality of this paper lies in the fact that it is the first to specifically examine the relationship between outside directors and community disclosures in annual reports. The paper contributes both to the corporate governance and community disclosure literature.
  • Investigating the link between CSR and Financial Performance – Evidence from Vietnamese Listed Companies

    Ho Ngoc, T.T; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Sheffield Hallam (No idea, 2014)
    Many studies have examined different issues around CSR by using data from western countries to examine the nexus between CSR and Corporate Financial Performance (CFP). There are a few literatures about the same topic in Asian countries. The paper therefore investigates the impacts of CSR on CFP by using Vietnamese data. The paper uses content analysis to examine the nexus described above by creating four hypotheses. Apart from CFP variables, the paper controls for size and risk in the model used. We collected data from the annual reports of 20 Vietnamese companiesfor 3 years giving a total of 60 observations. We document a modest relationship between CSR and CFP among companies in Vietnam. The study also found relationship between the level of debt and CSR but document no relationship between CSR and firm size. Limitations: Content analysis with its measurement problem remains the main limitation of this work. Another limitation is the sample size of 20 companies with a total of 60 observations.The study provides some important insights for our understanding of CSR in developing economies and its effects on CFP in the context of Vietnamese companies.
  • The determinants of CEO turnover: evidence from French listed companies

    Boussaada, R; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Makhlouf, M; Coventry University (CAIRN.INFO, 2018)
    We investigate the effect of corporate performance, ownership structure and other governance mechanisms on CEO turnover. Based on data from 153 French listed firms between 2003 and 2012, we use logit estimation technique. Consistent with previous studies, we show that the fall of financial performance increases drastically the CEO turnover probability. In addition, we find differentiated direct and moderating effects, depending on the type of broad shareholder involvement. However, the CEO does not influence the likelihood of CEO turnover
  • Blockchain in supply chain management: Australian manufacturer case study

    Abou Maroun, Elias; Daniel, Jay; Zowghi, Didar; Talaei-Khoei, Amir; University of Technology Sydney; University of Derby; University of Nevada (ASSRI and Springer, 2019-10-06)
    The recent explosion of interest around Blockchain and capabilities of this technology to track all types of transaction more transparently and securely motivate us to explore the possibilities Blockchain offers across the supply chain. This paper examines whether Blockchain makes a good fit for use in an Australian manufacturer supply chain. To address this, the research uses Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a framework from the literature. Blockchain allows us to have permissioned or permission-less distributed ledgers where stakeholders can interact with each other. It details how Blockchain works and the mechanism of hash algorithms which allows for greater security of information. It also focuses on the supply chain management and looks at the intricacies of a manufacturers supply chain. We present a review of the processes in place of an electrical manufacturer and the problems faced in the supply chain. A model is proposed in using public and private Blockchains to overcome these issues. The proposed solution has the potential to bring greater transparency, validity across the supply chain, and improvement of communication between stakeholders involved. We also point out some potential issues that should be considered if adopting Blockchain.
  • Psychopathic traits of corporate leadership as predictors of future stock returns

    Wisniewski, Tomasz Piotr; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Omar, Ayman; Coventry University (Wiley, 2019-10-07)
    This paper examines whether it is possible to forecast one-year-ahead returns of individual companies based on the observed ‘psychopathic’ characteristics of their top management team. We find that language characteristic of psychopaths present in annual report narratives, questionable integrity, excessive risk-taking and failure to contribute to charitable undertakings tend to reduce future shareholder wealth. These findings imply that firms could benefit from incorporating psychological evaluation in their recruitment processes, especially when seeking to fill senior management posts. While the return predictability described in this paper supports the upper echelons perspective, it simultaneously challenges the notion of informationally efficient stock prices.

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