Recent Submissions

  • Underpinning prosociality: Age related performance in theory of mind, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning

    Spenser, Karin; Bull, Ray; Betts, Lucy; Winder, Belinda; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Elsevier BV, 2020-09-06)
    This paper investigates the idea that Theory of Mind (ToM), empathic understanding and moral reasoning are linked, and together contribute to prosocial behaviour. All three cognitive processes are explored in adolescents (aged 14–17 years), young-adults (aged 18–24 years) and middle-adults (aged 25–55). A statistically significant age-related difference was found on all measures between the adolescent group and the middle-adult group. Except for verbal ToM, all measures detected a statistically significant age-related difference between the adolescent group and the young adult group. However, except for verbal and visual ToM, no statistically significant age-related difference was found between the young-adult and middle-adult groups. A small to medium positive association was found between each of the five measures. These findings suggest that beyond adolescence ToM, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning might be improved which could be useful to researchers and practitioners interested in the later enhancement of prosociality in older individuals.
  • Integrated reporting

    Conway, Elaine; Robertson, Fiona; Ugiagbe-Green, Iwi; University of Derby; Leeds Beckett University; University of Leeds (Palgrave, 2021-07-30)
  • Configuration of enterprise support towards the clean growth challenge: a place-based perspective

    Baranova, Polina; Paterson, Fred; Gallotta, Bruno; University of Derby (SAGE, 2020-09-17)
    Although clean growth has been identified as one of the grand challenges of the UK Industrial Strategy, public policy paid little attention to the configuration of business support towards enhancing clean growth potential of SMEs. The dominant approach of policymakers to the design of enterprise support interventions appears to be ‘place-blind’ and downplays the challenges that SMEs face in engaging with the clean growth policy agenda. Based on a mixed methods methodology, involving a survey of 306 businesses, a range of public engagement exercises and an extensive interview schedule, the study explores SMEs engagement with the clean growth challenge and associated business support mechanisms. We conceptualise the nexus of place-policy-practice as a way of framing policymaking approach in addressing the challenge. As part of the clean growth policy implementation, business support mechanisms need to move beyond a singular focus on energy efficiency and shift towards a holistic approach to capacity building for sustainable development. Small business needs to project a district voice in the definition of place in the local industrial strategies and have access to enterprise support which is place-based, policy-informed and practice-relevant.
  • Use of social marketing principles in sexual health: an exploratory review

    Akbar, M Bilal; French, Jeff; Lawson, Alison; University of Derby (Westburn Publishers Ltd, 2020-09-17)
    This paper presents a systematic review of the use of social marketing principles in sexual health studies in order to determine the effectiveness of the programmes. Systematic literature review method was used, and Andreasen’s (2002) benchmark criteria were adopted to analyse the use of social marketing principles in the selected studies. There is evidence of full use of some elements of Andreasen’s (2002) benchmark criteria, for example, consumer research, behaviour change objectives and segmentation. The use of the marketing mix theory and exchange elements were limited, whereas the evidence of the use of competition is not noted. In addition, the majority of the selected studies focus on short-term objectives leading to varying and inconsistent outcomes. Overall, no single element of Andreasen’s (2002) benchmark criteria was independently associated with the success of any of the selected studies. The review highlights a need to use more social marketing principles in planning and implementing sexual health programmes to enhance their effectiveness. Improvement in performance might be achieved through the development and application of a new social marketing informed methodology for designing social programmes on sexual health.
  • AfCFTA and lex mercatoria: reconceptualising international trade law in Africa

    Onyejekwe, Chisa; Ekhator, Eghosa; Canterbury Christ Church University; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-09-08)
    This paper focuses on the Agreement for the Establishment of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). It argues that commercial activities in precolonial Africa was akin to the phenomenon of lex mercatoria in medieval Europe. It discusses two major tenets embedded in the AfCFTA: the variable geometry principle and the dispute settlement mechanism. It argues that for structural and comparative purposes, these principles (variable geometry and dispute settlement) form the kernel of modern lex mercatoria in the African context. This paper concludes by advocating that the AfCFTA will enhance the principles of lex mercatoria by promoting African trade principles.
  • Institutional development and the Astana international financial center in Kazakhstan

    Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; Bekmurzayeva, Zhanyl; Janaidar, Dina; University of Essex (Washington University, 2020)
    This article investigates the most recent instance of the transplantation of English corporate and financial law into a different legal environment. The Astana International Financial Center (AIFC) in Kazakhstan was launched in 2018. The AIFC has largely built on the institutional model pioneered by the Dubai International Financial Center. This key institutional innovation is the transplanting and operation of laws based on the English common law, independent of their national legal systems (civil law systems, heavily influenced by Islamic tradition, and, in the case of Kazakhstan, also Soviet socialist principles). This article seeks to contribute to the understanding of the system of Kazakhstan, a strategically located but well under-investigated country, and a potentially viable institutional model for other aspiring financial centers. To the best knowledge of the authors, this work is the first ever English academic literature on the development of the AIFC.
  • RE: AB (termination of pregnancy)[2019] EWA CIV 1215: ‘wishes and feelings’ under the mental capacity act 2005

    Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2020-06-15)
    In Re: AB (Termination of Pregnancy), the Court of Appeal was asked to consider an assumption made about the future living arrangements of a pregnant patient, and the weight to be ascribed to her wishes and feelings when she had no real understanding of her predicament. This commentary explores the importance of taking into account the perspective of the patient, even if suffering from a mental disorder, and it will analyse the existing common law to show that the weaker the ability of the patient to form her own wishes and feelings, the more appropriate it would be to rely on the remaining evidence.
  • When too little or too much hurts: evidence for a curvilinear relationship between team faultlines and performance

    Chen, S.; Wang, D.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, Z.; Wu, D.; Zhejiang University of Finance & Economics, Hangzhou, 310018, China; City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China (Springer, 2017-04-27)
    Faultlines are inherent to many workgroups, but the literature has not fully explained what faultlines mean for team functioning. In this study, we investigate the curvilinear relationship between faultlines and team performance from a crosscategorization perspective. Analyses of multisource data obtained from 61 workgroups located in China support an inverted U-shaped relationship between faultlines and team performance. Additionally, we find that this curvilinear relationship is moderated by a team’s climate of psychological safety such that the curvilinear relationship is more pronounced among teams with a weaker psychological safety climate. The findings contribute to elaborating the nature of and advancing a contingency view of the relationship between faultlines and team performance. Theoretical implications are discussed along with possible limitations and directions for future research.
  • Standing in my customer’s shoes: effects of customer-oriented perspective taking on proactive service performance

    Huo, Y.; Chen, Z.; Lam, W.; Wood, S. A.; University of Surrey; City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong; The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kon (The British Psychology Society, 2018-12-04)
    We develop a theoretical framework that delineates the process by which customer oriented perspective taking contributes to employees’ proactive service performance. Drawing from motivated information processing and proactivity perspectives, the model hypothesizes that employees’ customer-oriented perspective taking enhances their role breadth self-efficacy (RBSE), which in turn enhances proactive customer service performance and proactive complaint-handling performance. A three-wave, time-lagged study, involving 145 frontline employees and their immediate supervisors in the Chinese hospitality industry, tests the research model. The results of structural equation modelling show taking customers’ perspectives results in a high level of RBSE. This relationship grows stronger if employees exhibit a strongly proactive personality. A high level of RBSE also mediates the interactive effects of customer-oriented perspective taking and proactive personality on proactive customer service performance and proactive complaint-handling performance. These findings provide insights for research on perspective taking, RBSE, and proactive service performance.
  • Who is fit to serve? person–job/organization fit, emotional labor, and customer service performance

    Lam, W.; Huo, Y.; CHEN, Ziguang; Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong; University of Surrey (Wiley, 2018-11-07)
    This study investigates person–job (P–J) fit and person–organization (P–O) fit perceptions and relates these perceptions to employees' emotional labor and customer service performance. Data from a two-point, time-lagged study of 263 employees and 690 customers reveal that both P–J and P–O fit relate positively to deep acting and negatively to surface acting, in accordance with an emotional labor perspective. In addition, P–J and P–O fit are jointly associated with emotional labor, such that the positive link between P–J fit and deep acting is stronger, and the negative link between P–J fit and surface acting is weaker when P–O fit is high. Emotional labor partially mediates the interactive effects of P–J and P–O fit on service interaction quality and customer satisfaction; service interaction quality relates positively to customer satisfaction. These findings have multiple theoretical and practical implications.
  • How and when peers' positive mood influence employees' voice

    Liu, w.; Tangirala, S.; Lam, W.; Chen, Z.; Jia, R. T.; Huang, X.; City University of Hong Kong (American Psychological Association, 2014-11-03)
    Employees often assess whether the social context is favorable for them to speak out, yet little research has investigated how the target’s mood might influence the actor’s voice behavior. From an affect-associal-information perspective, we explored such potential effects of the target’s mood on the actor’s promotive voice in 2 empirical studies. In a scenario-based study with 142 MBA students (Study 1), the target’s positive mood was positively associated with the actor’s intentions to engage in promotive voice toward that target, mediated by the actor’s perceived psychological safety. This mediated relationship was stronger when (a) the quality of the relationship between the actor and the target was poor or (b) the actor had a lower social status than the target. We replicated these results in Study 2, a correlational field study with 572 dyads nested within 142 members of 30 teams, where the actor’s promotive voice behaviors (rather than intentions) were measured.
  • Uncovering the impact of triadic relationships within a team on job performance: an application of balance theory in predicting feedback‐seeking behaviour

    Lan, Junbang; Huo, Yuanyuan; Cai, Zhenyao; Wong, Chi‐Sum; Chen, Ziguang; Lam, Wing; Sun Yat‐sen University, China; University of Surrey; Shanghai University, China; University of Technology Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; et al. (Wiley, 2020-04-14)
    Although a great deal of knowledge has accumulated about dyadic relationships (i.e., leader–member exchange (LMX) or team–member exchange (TMX)) within a team, employee behaviours that involve triadic relationships among focal employees, leaders, and teammates have seldom been investigated. Using balance theory, which describes triadic relationships from a power dependence perspective, in the current study, we explore how the interplay of LMX, TMX, and peers’ LMX jointly impacts employees’ feedback‐seeking behaviour (FSB) and subsequent job performance. By conducting a multilevel moderated polynomial regression on three‐wave, multi‐source data from 147 team members and their leaders (from 45 work teams), we found that the incongruence between LMX and TMX facilitates FSB when peers’ LMX or task interdependence is high. We also found an asymmetrical incongruence effect concerning the way in which individuals are more likely to seek feedback when LMX is worse than TMX, compared with when LMX is better than TMX. This differential effect is stronger when peers’ LMX or task interdependence is high. The interplay of LMX, TMX, peers’ LMX, and task interdependence eventually has an indirect effect on job performance through FSB. The results from a follow‐up study of 270 employees from 77 teams further confirm our predictions about the mechanism of balance theory. Specifically, the results indicate that when peers’ LMX is high, the incongruence between LMX and TMX decreases employees’ psychological safety.
  • Analysing the risks of adopting circular economy initiatives in manufacturing supply chains

    Ethirajan, Manavalan; Arasu M, Thanigai; Kandasamy, Jayakrishna; K.E.K, Vimal; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Kumar, Anil; VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India; National Institute of Technology, Patna, Bihar, India; University of Derby; London Metropolitan University (Wiley, 2020-08-25)
    The concept of circular economy (CE) has proven its worth due to the scarcity of natural resources and huge amounts of wastage which impacts the environment. Thus, the adoption of the CE concept in the supply chain becomes critical. However, due to the complex nature of processes/activities in the circular supply chain (CSC), managing risk has become a priority to avoid disruption. In current literature, no discussion has been conducted on how to analyse the risks in the context of CSC. Therefore, to fill this literature gap, this study concentrates on identifying and analysing the risks to promote effective circular initiatives in supply chains in the context of the manufacturing industry, thus minimising the negative environmental impact. A total of 31 risks were identified through an extensive literature review and discussions with experts. A grey‐based decision‐making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method is applied by incorporating the experts' knowledge to compute prominence and cause/effect scores to develop an interrelationship map. Finally, a vulnerability matrix for risk categories is developed using the average of prominence and cause/effect scores of risks. The results show that transparent process is the most prominent risk and branding is the least significant risk. By using the average prominence and cause/effect score, a risk category, namely, financial risk, is identified as most vulnerable to CSC. These findings will help industry managers not only to prepare business strategies in the adoption of CE initiatives in supply chains by eliminating risks but also in minimising negative environmental impact.
  • Religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and wales religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and Wales: interim findings and emergent themes

    Weller, Paul; Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby (2012-09-05)
    Issues around discrimination and equality in religion or belief are sensitive and highly contested, involving freedom of conscience and speech; religious activity in community and public life; employer and service provider responsibilities. They connect with understandings of religion, social policy and the law. Put alongside issues of gender and sexual orientation, there has often been tension and conflict. The “Religion and Belief, Discrimination and Equality in England and Wales: Theory, Policy and Practice (2000-2010)” research project is in its final year. It aims to be a benchmark study, including comparison with results of 1999-2001 research on “Religious Discrimination in England in Wales”. The completed research includes a national questionnaire survey of religious organisations and fieldwork among religious, public, private and voluntary sector groups (including focus groups with the “non-religious”). Review of legal cases and policy developments continues while a review on religious discrimination evidence was published in 2011 by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/research/research_report_73_religious_discrimination.pdf). At the conference it will be possible to present some provisional findings and emergent themes which will then be tested further during Autumn 2012 in a series of Knowledge Exchange Workshops with practitioners from the public, private, voluntary, religion and belief, and legal sectors.
  • Religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and wales religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and Wales: interim findings and emergent themes

    Weller, Paul; Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby (AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society Research Programme Podcasts, 2012-09-05)
    Issues around discrimination and equality in religion or belief are sensitive and highly contested, involving freedom of conscience and speech; religious activity in community and public life; employer and service provider responsibilities. They connect with understandings of religion, social policy and the law. Put alongside issues of gender and sexual orientation, there has often been tension and conflict. The “Religion and Belief, Discrimination and Equality in England and Wales: Theory, Policy and Practice (2000-2010)” research project is in its final year. It aims to be a benchmark study, including comparison with results of 1999-2001 research on “Religious Discrimination in England in Wales”. The completed research includes a national questionnaire survey of religious organisations and fieldwork among religious, public, private and voluntary sector groups (including focus groups with the “non-religious”). Review of legal cases and policy developments continues while a review on religious discrimination evidence was published in 2011 by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/research/research_report_73_religious_discrimination.pdf). At the conference it will be possible to present some provisional findings and emergent themes which will then be tested further during Autumn 2012 in a series of Knowledge Exchange Workshops with practitioners from the public, private, voluntary, religion and belief, and legal sectors.
  • Controversies as a lens on change

    Weller, Paul; University of Derby; Weller, P., and Winter., N. (2012). ‘Controversies as a lens on change’ [Podcast]. 16 February. Available at: http://www.religionandsociety.org.uk/publications/podcasts/show/paul_weller_controversies_as_a_lens_on_change. (AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society Research Programme Podcasts, 2012-02-16)
    “Controversies as a lens on change” is the title of the opening chapter of Religion and Change in Modern Britain (published Feb 2012 by Routledge). In this podcast Norman Winter is in conversation with one of the joint authors of this chapter, Paul Weller. Professor Weller has worked in the field of inter-faith and multi-faith studies at the University of Derby for over 20 years. He is Principal Investigator on Religion and Society project Religion and Belief, Discrimination and Equality in England and Wales: Theory, Policy and Practice (2000-2010). The co-writer of this chapter was Malory Nye, the Principal of the Al-Maktoum College of Higher Education in Dundee. In this chapter the authors view highly-publicised arguments and conflicts as markers of underlying trends, revealing the changing concerns about religion which have engaged the public from the Second World War to the present. Paul Weller talks about the changing nature of the media which has also contributed to how those conflicts and concerns have been portrayed, especially with the advent of new media which have brought new immediacy and interactivity. The chapter moves forward in time. In the early part of the period the Christian Church and its legacy were still dominant, and arguments often revolved around deviation from that tradition, for instance in the 1963 publication of “Honest to God”, or expressions of anxiety about cults and new religious movements. Debate and dispute regarding other major world faiths gradually gained prominence. In the 1970s, local residents in Hertfordsire opposed the establishment of a Hindu place of worship at Bhaktivedanta Manor. Then in 1989, some time after its original publication, Salman Rushdie’s novel “The Satanic Verses” sparked highly-publicised outrage among Muslims, with TV images of book-burning. This was fuelled further when the supreme leader of Iran, the Ayatollah Khomeini, pronounced Rushdie to be an apostate, and a bounty was put upon his death. More recent controversies have revealed further conflicts between rights and freedoms, both within faiths and between religion and society as a whole. There have been public arguments about Islamic dress and Islamist teaching. The play “Behzti” (2004) and the BBC2 screening of “Jerry Springer the Opera” (2005) provoked strong movements of opposition. New legal protections and rights, for instance in services offered to gay couples, prompted conservative Christian opposition. The chapter also describes the political and media discussion of the “failure of multiculturalism”.
  • The clash of civilisations thesis and religious responses

    Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Fatih University, 2010-12-25)
    The article describes key aspects of Samuel Huntington’s “Clash of Civilizations” thesis. It acknowledges the way in which that thesis has picked up on some key changes in relation to the role of religion in public life and, especially, in international relations. But it also critiques the thesis for its “essentializing” and “bloc” approach to cultures and societies, arguing that such an approach does not take sufficient account of the differences and sometimes fault-lines and conflicts within societies and cultural groups. For what might characterise appropriate religiously informed responses to Huntington’s thesis, the article proposes an approach based on four “keynotes” of “modesty”, “integrity”, “realism” and “distinctiveness”.
  • International environmental governance: A case for sub-regional judiciaries in Africa

    Ekhator, Eghosa Osa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillam, 2020-08-21)
    Arguably, due to the non-justiciability of the right to environment doctrine in many African countries, Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs), activists, communities and individuals now utilise the sub-regional judiciaries in accessing justice in environmental issues. This chapter focuses on the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Community Court of Justice (ECCJ) and the East African Court of Justice (EACJ) because they are amongst the most active sub-regional judiciaries in Africa. The main question this chapter addresses is whether the rise of environmental governance or litigation in sub-regional judiciaries leads to better environmental protection for the victims and communities. The methodology adopted in this study is of a doctrinal nature that consists of library-based texts analysis. This paper undertakes a critical analysis of the emergent environmental governance under the sub-regional judiciaries in Africa.
  • Social and transitional identity: exploring social networks and their significance in a therapeutic community setting

    Best, David; I. Lubman, Dan; Savic, Michael; Wilson, Ann; Dingle, Genevieve; Alexander Haslam, S.; Haslam, Catherine; Jetten, Jolanda; Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre, Eastern Health: Eastern Health, Fitzroy, Australia and Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia (Emerald, 2014-04-08)
    There is considerable literature indicating the importance of social connectedness and its relationship to wellbeing. For problem substance users, a similar literature emphasises the importance of the transition from a social network supportive of use to one that fosters recovery. Within this framework, the therapeutic community (TC) is seen as a critical location for adopting a transitional identity (i.e. from a “drug user” to a “member of the TC”), as part of the emergence of a “recovery identity” following treatment. The purpose of this paper is to outline a model for conceptualising and measuring identity based on the theories of social identity and recovery capital, and pilots this model within a TC setting. A social identity mapping was used with TC residents to test their identification with “using” and “TC” groups, and their relationship to recovery capital. The network mapping method was acceptable to TC residents, and provided valuable insights into the social networks and social identity of TC residents. This paper explores issues around mapping social identity and its potential in the TC and other residential settings. The paper integrates a number of conceptual models to create a new framework for understanding transitions in social networks during treatment and reports on a novel measurement method underpinning this.
  • A model for predicting clinician satisfaction with clinical supervision

    Best, David; White, Edward; Cameron, Jacqui; Guthrie, Anna; Hunter, Barbara; Hall, Kate; Leicester, Steve; Lubman, Dan I.; Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; University of New South Wales, Sidney, Australia; et al. (Informa UK Limited, 2014-01-06)
    Clinical supervision can improve staff satisfaction and reduce stress and burnout within the workplace and can be a component of organizational readiness to implement evidence-based practice. This study explores clinical supervision processes in alcohol and drug counselors working in telephone and online services, assessing how their experiences of supervision link to workplace satisfaction and well-being. Standardized surveys (Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale and the TCU Survey of Organizational Functioning) were completed by 43 alcohol and drug telephone counselors. Consistency of supervisors and good communication were the strongest predictors of satisfaction with clinical supervision, and satisfaction with supervision was a good predictor of overall workplace satisfaction.

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