• Gender representation, power and identity in mental health and art therapy.

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12-14)
    • Self-belief in education

      Jinks, Gavin; Harber, Denise; University of Derby (Human Givens Publishing, 2018-12)
    • Rediscovering the playful learner.

      Bird, Drew; Holmwood, Clive; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
    • Learning as a creative and developmental process in higher education: A therapeutic arts approach and its wider application.

      Taylor, Judie; Holmwood, Clive; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
      Much has been written about the importance of creativity in learning and education over the last few decades. This unique book extends beyond the usual focus on implementing creative methods in learning, teaching and assessing within higher education, to an examination of creativity as central to a learning process which is transformational for the student. More specifically, Learning as a Creative and Developmental Process in Higher Education examines the importance of a facilitative tutor-student relationship and environment which contextualise this creative process of teaching and learning.  Bringing together unique teaching and learning approaches developed by experienced academics, this book discusses a number of complex issues, including approaches to an understanding of the student’s self-concept as learner; the nature of the curriculum; the potential of metaphor and creativity; and a multi-modal approach to learning and teaching. Contributions to the book also examine some of the challenges and tensions of such an approach within the context of arts-based subjects in higher education institutions. Using a unique and coherent thematic structure that is based upon the student journey as a transformational process, this book provides a new way of understanding the student journey through higher education.  Including an examination of the parallels between educational and arts education and arts therapies disciplines, this book will be of interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students involved in the arts and the arts therapies, as well as those studying creativity in teaching and learning in higher education. It should be of particular interest to those involved in the teaching and training of teachers and lecturers in higher education.
    • Liminality in higher education – gaps and moments of uncertainty as legitimate learning spaces.

      Holmwood, Clive; Scales, Pete; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
      Higher Education, learning and teaching philosophy is beginning to acknowledge that programmes crammed full of top down knowledge (Fox & Radloff 1999) are not the best way for teachers to teach or students to learn. Therefore, academically dense lectures and programmes packed with knowledge and information might not be conducive to student learning in the ‘google’ era, when information is readily available at the click of a button. With ideas such as the flipped classroom (Tucker 2012), we are beginning to consider that students should play a greater role in the teaching and learning process and that they be given new, evolving and appropriate spaces in the curriculum in which to do that. In this chapter, the notion of liminal spaces, gaps and moments of uncertainty within programmes of study, and threshold concepts (Meyer and Land, 2003) will be considered. This is a relatively new idea in Higher Education, which focuses on shifts in thinking and learning within the context of liminal spaces. Pete Scales brings many years of HE experience, whilst Clive Holmwood shares his anthropological understanding of space from a therapist’s perspective. Together they begin to consider the legitimate importance of gaps and spaces in the teaching curriculum; suggesting that these ambiguous spaces are where ‘deep learning’ (Biggs & Tang 2011) can potentially take place.
    • Assessing the Arts, and student response, within the creative expressive therapies in higher education.

      Holmwood, Clive; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
      My original focus, through a small research project, was to examine the complexity of assessing the arts within dance, drama, art and music pathways on the BA (Hons) Creative Expressive Therapies programme (which will potentially change to BA (Hons) Arts Health and Wellbeing) at the University of Derby. However, my research focus shifted as I became increasingly more interested in how students responded emotionally to the assessment process and their individual feedback. So, the research came to be less about how the assessments are carried out by lecturers, and more about students’ personal emotional responses to them. This led to three areas of focus which appeared to be of key concern to students, assessing creativity, tutor bias and student understanding.
    • Student Mentoring and peer learning: a partnership approach.

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Perspectives In Education Conference 2018, 2018-10)
      In 2015 I initiated a student mentoring and peer assisted learning project for year 1 students on the BA Applied Social Work at the University of Derby. Initially this was a small and low key idea. I recruited 5 students from the 2nd and 3rd years to run a short session during induction week and to be contactable so that the new year 1s could raise any questions and queries which they preferred not to raise with tutors. On review discussions with both mentors and mentees indicated that year 1 students wanted to have a significantly developed student mentoring scheme. The following year 19 further mentors were recruited from year 1 in order to develop the project. Mentors took responsibility for 2 full days of student induction. A number of mentor led presentations were delivered during Induction Week on a range of topics. They also took responsibility for setting up and managing a Facebook group for the new year 1 students. The Facebook group was set up in the summer before the new year 1s began the degree programme and allowed information to be given to new students as well as providing an opportunity for the new students to raise questions with their peers in years 2 and 3. Student mentors were also involved in providing assignment guidance to year 1 students for subjects in which those mentors had been very successful. Mentors were also involved in co-teaching module learning input for topics in which they had demonstrated significant knowledge or expertise. As we move into the 3rd year of the project the plan is to expand the remit so that year 2 students also receive mentoring from year 3 mentors. There is also a plan for the creation of mentor led study groups. A ‘mentor away day’ will take place in May 2018 to review the project so far and plan for the forthcoming academic year. A key feature of the approach taken is that decisions are based on a partnership between myself and the student mentors. Decision making is based on consensus and mentors have significant responsibility for their input. Another key finding thus far has been the enthusiasm with which those invited to take on the student mentor role have responded. The philosophy of partnership has undoubtedly resulted in mentors articulating a real sense of ownership regarding the project and its development. Equally striking has been the sense of being valued that mentors experience.
    • Record, pause, rewind: a low tech approach to teaching communication (and other) skills.

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Perspectives In Education Conference 2018, 2018-10)
      Over the last 3 years I have developed a technique for teaching communication skills on the BA Applied Social Work programme at the University of Derby. The idea for the technique was originally based on a skills course I attended which involved the use of video recording equipment. I took the view that I could achieve similar results simply by asking participants to imagine that they were being recorded! The technique involves students working with a facilitator in groups of approximately 12. They are asked to come prepared to demonstrate their skills with a character from a case study they are familiar with. The character is played by an actor (usually a member of staff). One person from the group volunteers or is asked to play the role of the professional. All are asked to imagine that once the conversation starts the scenario is being recorded on video. At any point the ‘volunteer’ can say “pause” and ask for help from everyone else. The facilitator can also pause in order to make some learning points. And those watching can pause to make suggestions or comments. The technique also allows pauses to be used to ask the ‘actor’ playing the client how they feel about the conversation. The technique allows real time ‘reflection in action’ in a safe environment. After reflection a decision is frequently made to rewind to an earlier point in the conversation to see what happens if the ‘volunteer’ tries a different approach. The technique has proved extremely popular as a learning tool and could be applied to the teaching of a wide range of skills.
    • The host revisited.

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby; Original music by Matt Le Mare; Directed by Katy Tozer (Buxton Fringe Festival 2018, 2018-07-12)
      A darkly comic, fragmented tale with serious aspirations, no actors or scenery, and only one chair! This one-man show plays with the fine line between commitment and obsession; between something and nothing; between imagination and the empty space. Original music by Matt Le Mare and Directed by Katy Tozer.
    • An a/r/tographic exploration of engagement in theatrical performance: What does this mean for the student/teacher relationship?

      Bird, Drew; Tozer, Katy; University of Derby; University of Derby, UK; University of Derby, UK (Sage, 2018-07-11)
      With an emphasis on self-study and the connections between the personal and the professional domain, the authors reflect upon their teaching practice on a postgraduate theatre-based course using the research methodology of a/r/tography. The aim was to develop understanding of teacher/student roles and how these can affect learning. Through researcher reflexivity, focus groups and questionnaires, data were captured from students/participants responding to a video of the researcher’s solo performance work. The research presents itself through three a/r/tographic renderings. First, the experience of seeing tutors in unfamiliar roles is considered. Second, the impact of witnessing tutors taking risks as a performer and being vulnerable is discussed and, lastly, the work illuminates new ways of opening up as teachers. The authors explore how the student’s/participant’s perception of them as tutors seemed to change after witnessing them as artists and how this impacted upon student’s learning for their own assessed performance pieces.
    • The host.

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (European Federation of Dramatherapy 4th European Dramatherapy Conference: Borders in Action, Nürtingen, Germany., 2018-04-28)
      The performance is an ongoing solo performance that explores the borders between characters and their external and internal worlds. A host guides the audience through the performance introducing them to various characters and their worlds. A bride groom stands at the front of the church, an integrator attempts to squeeze out a password from a man bound to a chair, a cheerleader relentlessly practices her routine, an emaciated women is tied to a tree and a door waits to be opened. The external and internal world of the performer comes under close scrutiny as the host of the show attempts to pull the fragmented show together with no actors or scenery and only one chair. The performance exposes the borders of the characters rigid worlds and the transformation and energy that ensues when those world collide and elide. The performance explores the borders of the personal and autobiographical with the professional role of a Drama therapist and facilitator. The performer facilitates and guides an autobiographical performance that is informed by the research methodology known as Heuristic Inquiry. Using the characteristics of intuition and illumination the performer draws on personal material to deepen ones understanding of a Drama therapist and the importance of play in the therapeutic process. The borders between the story of the performer and the audience’s story are drawn closer together as the performance draws on mythological and existential themes. The performance approach breaks down the 4th wall, guiding the audience into a shared world and existence with the staged characters. The performance plays with the imagination and the borders between the seen and unseen and the energy that is created when separate worlds elide. Directed by Katy Tozer.
    • Values-based practice (VBP) training for radiographers.

      Strudwick Ruth; Newton-Hughes, Ann; Gibson, Sue; Harris, Joanne; Gradwell, Mark; Hyde, Emma; Harvey-Lloyd, Jane; O'Regan, Tracy; Hendry, Julie; University of Suffolk; University of Salford; Canterbury Christchurch University; University of Derby; Kingston University (The National Association of Educators in Practice, 2018-04-20)
    • Evaluation of shared placements between MSc Pre-Registration and BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography students.

      Partner, Alexandra; Shiner, Naomi; Hyde, Emma; University of Derby (National Association Educators in Practice (NAEP), 2018-04-20)
      Background A new two year Masters (pre-registration) Diagnostic Radiography programme was introduced in 2016 at the University. It is one of only 4 courses of this type in the country. To date no literature has been published to evaluate the impact of such a course. The Masters students (level 7) share multiple teaching sessions with the undergraduate students (level 4); mixed level teaching is a new development for the current academic team. These cohorts undertake their clinical placement at the same NHS site over the same time period. This has provided an opportunity to evaluate the perceptions, expectations and experiences of the students learning together on placement. Aims To evaluate the shared placement experience of MSc (Pre-Registration) Diagnostic Radiography and BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography from their perspective Method The study used a questionnaire design to gather quantitative and qualitative data from all groups. Both the MSc (n=5) and BSc (n=38) students were included to provide comparative data. This will be enriched with qualitative data gained from small focus groups undertaken at the end of the MSc shared placement block. Analysis: Analysis is ongoing but provisional results from the BSc students is that the presence of level 7 MSc students within the classroom is enjoyable and adds depth to the learning as they pose more challenging questions. Working together on placement has been a positive experience. Conclusion Mixed level teaching enriches discussion within the classroom, is more time and cost efficient. The addition of the MSc Pre-Registration Fast Track Diagnostic Radiography has increased student numbers without significantly impacting on capacity, whilst addressing the local workforce needs. The results of the study will form part of the programme evaluation and provides opportunity to develop the curriculum in close partnership with placement providers.
    • Approaching development of a new education programme in diagnostic radiography.

      Partner, Alexandra; University of Derby (International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT), 2018-04)
      Introduction: Developing a new Diagnostic Radiography education programme is a large project, and is a multi-facetted complex process. Reviewing the most innovative ways to undertake learning, teaching and assessment and embed them into the University is crucial to enhance the quality of education. Preparing graduates adequately for practice is vital to meet the demands of the workforce. In the UK, removal of NHS Bursaries following the Comprehensive Spending Review (HM Treasury, 2015) has led to a more competitive environment where providers need to look for unique selling points. Methods: A review of current legislation, national guidance and policies was undertaken to check for relevant alterations. A thorough appraisal of all Professional Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) documentation and national level organisations was completed. Project planning started between 2 years and 18 months prior to the planned delivery date. Stakeholders were invited to a number of on-site sessions to brain storm what employers need from graduates over the next 5 years. It’s important that views are sought from a variety of interested parties including; academics, placement providers, employers, service users, students and external examiners. After this the follow-up sessions were divided into placement, curriculum and assessment. Strengths and weaknesses were identified in the current programme and brain storming exercises looking at what new curricula needed implementing. Conclusion: The programme was approved by the University the PSRB’s. The programme was designed using innovative learning and teaching methods and a variety of assessment methods. Having themes which built on topics throughout the programme allowed these to be embedded more effectively. Looking at ways to offer placement in a more creative way and supporting this with simulation allows for increased capacity. Having the right programme impacts on recruitment, student experience, student attainment and employability. Once the programme has been delivered in its first year an evaluation of the individual modules and the year as an overview will be evaluated. It is necessary to keep up to date with new guidance and currency of practice and continually improve educational programmes to be able to produce competent graduates and compete as a business.
    • Student mentoring and peer learning.

      Jinks, Gavin; Maneely-Edmunds, Carl; University of Derby (2018-03-27)
      A presentation exploring the implementation of a student mentoring and peer learning project on the BA Social Work programme at the University of Derby
    • The host.

      Bird, Drew; Tozer, Katy; University of Derby; Le Mare, Matt; Baron, Chris (The Maypole Café Bar and Theatre, 2018-02-10)
      A darkly comic, fragmented tale with serious aspirations, no actors or scenery, and only one chair! This one-man show plays with the fine line between commitment and obsession; between something and nothing; between imagination and the empty space. Original music by Matt Le Mare and Chris Baron, music directed by Matt Le Mare. Directed by Katy Tozer
    • Sonographic parameters for diagnosing fetal head engagement during labour.

      Wiafe, Yaw Amo; Whitehead, Bill; Venables, Heather; Odoi, Alexander T.; University of Derby; Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technolog; Department of Nursing, Radiography and Healthcare, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Nursing, Radiography and Healthcare, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Nursing, Radiography and Healthcare, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana (Sage, 2018-02-01)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of the head–perineum distance, angle of progression, and the head–symphysis distance as intrapartum ultrasound parameters in the determination of an engaged fetal head. Two hundred and one women in labour underwent both ultrasound and digital vaginal examination in the estimation of fetal head station. The transperineal ultrasound measured head–perineum distance, angle of progression, and head–symphysis distance for values correlating with digital vaginal examination head station. Using station 0 as the minimum level of head engagement, correlating cutoff values for head–perineum distance, angle of progression, and head–symphysis distance were obtained. Receiver operating characteristics were used in determining the diagnostic performance of these cut-off values for the detection of fetal head engagement. With head–perineum distance of 3.6 cm the sensitivity and specificity of sonographic determination of engaged fetal head were 78.7 and 72.3%, respectively. A head–symphysis distance of 2.8 cm also had sensitivity and specificity of 74.5 and 70.8%, respectively, in determining engagement, whilst an angle of progression of 101 was consistent with engagement by digital vaginal examination with 68.1% sensitivity and 68.2% specificity. Ultrasound shows high diagnostic performance in determining engaged fetal head at a head–perineum distance of 3.6 cm, head–symphysis distance of 2.8 cm, and angle of progression of 101.
    • Virtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke.

      Threapleton, Kate; Newberry, Karen; Sutton, Greg; Worthington, Esme; Drummond, Avril; University of Nottingham; University of Derby (Sage, 2018-01-09)
      Virtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke Show less Kate Threapleton, Karen Newberry, Greg Sutton, Esme Worthington, Avril Drummond First Published January 9, 2018 Research Article Download PDFPDF download for Virtually home: Feasibility study and pilot randomised controlled trial of a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke Article information Full Access Article Information Article first published online: January 9, 2018 Received: January 27, 2017; Accepted: October 19, 2017 https://doi.org/10.1177/0308022617743459 Kate Threapleton1, Karen Newberry2, Greg Sutton3, Esme Worthington1, Avril Drummond4 1Research Fellow, 14278School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK 2Senior Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, UK 3Learning Technology Developer, Learning Enhancement, University of Derby, UK 4Professor of Healthcare Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK Corresponding Author: Kate Threapleton, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, A Floor, South Block Link, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2HA, UK. Email: kate.threapleton@nottingham.ac.uk Abstract Introduction Virtual reality has the potential to assist occupational therapists in preparing patients for discharge by facilitating discussions and providing education about relevant practical issues and safety concerns. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of using a virtual reality intervention to support patient discharge after stroke and pilot its use. Method Practical aspects of delivering a virtual reality intervention prior to discharge were explored by means of a non-randomised feasibility study and a subsequent pilot randomised controlled trial. Factors considered included eligibility, recruitment, intervention delivery, attrition and suitability of outcome measures. Outcome measures included standardised assessments of stroke severity, mobility, health-related quality of life, functional ability, satisfaction with services and concerns about falling. Results Thirty-three participants were recruited in total: 17 to the feasibility study and 16 to the pilot trial. At 1-month follow-up, 14 participants (82%) were re-assessed in the feasibility study and 12 (75%) in the pilot trial. The main difficulties encountered related to recruitment, particularly regarding post-stroke cognitive impairments, the presence of mild deficits or illness. Conclusion It was feasible to recruit and retain participants, deliver the intervention and collect outcome measures, despite slow recruitment rates. These findings could inform the design of a definitive trial. Keywords
    • Creative ageing: the social policy challenge.

      Hogan, Susan; Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018)
    • Building capacity: an evaluation of the use of non-traditional placements in diagnostic radiography education

      Hyde, Emma; Errett, Sue; University of Derby (Society of Radiographers, 2017-12-01)
      This article shares the findings of a research project which evaluated student radiographers experiences of placements in a care setting, where there is no diagnostic imaging activity, and student radiographers experience of placements in private, voluntary and independent imaging settings.