• Routledge international handbook of play, therapeutic play and play therapy

      Jennings, Sue; Holmwood, Clive; University of derby; University of Witwatersrand, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Routledge International Handbook of Play, Therapeutic Play and Play Therapy is the first book of its kind to provide an overview of key aspects of play and play therapy, considering play on a continuum from generic aspects through to more specific applied and therapeutic techniques and as a stand-alone discipline. Presented in four parts, the book provides a unique overview of, and ascribes equal value to, the fields of play, therapeutic play, play in therapy and play therapy. Chapters by academics, play practitioners, counsellors, arts therapists and play therapists from countries as diverse as Japan, Cameroon, India, the Czech Republic, Israel, USA, Ireland, Turkey, Greece and the UK explore areas of each topic, drawing links and alliances between each.  The book includes complex case studies with children, adolescents and adults in therapy with arts and play therapists, research with children on play, work in schools, outdoor play and play therapy, animal-assisted play therapy, work with street children and play in therapeutic communities around the world. Routledge International Handbook of Play, Therapeutic Play and Play Therapy demonstrates the centrality of play in human development, reminds us of the creative power of play and offers new and innovative applications of research and practical technique. It will be of great interest to academics and students of play, play therapy, child development, education and the therapeutic arts. It will also be a key text for play and creative arts therapists, both in practice and in training, play practitioners, social workers, teachers and anyone working with children.
    • Neuro-dramatic play and a hero's journey: a play-based approach in a UK junior school

      Holmwood, Clive; University of derby (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      This chapter aims to consider the principles of neuro-dramatic play - NDP (Jennings 2011) as a form of pre-therapy/ structured interventional play. By running nine sessions with a group of 15 children (Years 3 to 6, 7-11 year olds), all of whom had been handpicked by school staff, due to their confidence and self-esteem issues; I will explore the notion of NDP as an effective form of low level play based intervention. By allowing the children to build bridges with each other through the play and going on a fantastical and dramatic hero’s journey, I will consider the appropriateness of NDP as a way of supporting the confidence and self-esteem of a small group of middle school age children in the UK.
    • Creative critical representation of the choreographer’s creation process

      Collard-Stokes, Gemma; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-11-30)
      This review examines Jonathan Burrows: Towards a Minor Dance, a monography by Daniela Perazzo Domm published within the Palgrave Macmillan’s New World Choreographies series. Perazzo Domm’s first monograph introduces British choreographer Jonathan Burrows, whose work is considered an important contribution to contemporary performance practices’ effort to rethink what constitutes choreography. The review focuses of the books main themes of socio-political creativity and collaboration at the intersection(s) of artist, body and composition. The review observes this through the endeavour to question relational aspects between the writer and the choreographer’s creative process.
    • Recreational burlesque and the aging female body: challenging perceptions

      Collard-Stokes, Gemma; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-10-28)
      Rejecting the association between aging and asexuality that persists in the UK’s cultural representation of the female aging body, this paper reveals the importance of sensuality and maintaining physical agency to older women. It pays attention to the phenomena of participating in recreational burlesque classes to counter and negotiate potentially negative representations. Through in-depth interviews and researcher-as-participant observation, the paper explores the transformative possibilities mediated through participating in theatrically glamorized performance classes and the processes thereby initiated. The author examines the potential of burlesque to offer improvements to wellbeing and healthier self-perceptions for aging women experiencing marginalization through social invisibility.
    • The magic of the mundane: the vulnerable web of connections between urban nature and wellbeing

      Dobson, Julian; Brindley, Paul; Birch, Jo; Henneberry, John; McEwan, Kirsten; Mears, Meagan; Richardson, Miles; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Sheffield; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-10-23)
      Cities are sites of human, ecological and institutional stress. The elements that make up the city – its people, landscapes and processes – are engaged in constant assemblage and disassembly, joining and pulling apart. Reporting the findings of a three-year multi-disciplinary deep case study, this paper examines the role of urban nature in mediating the relationship between stressed humans and stressed places. It applies assemblage theory to show how such relationships can be understood in contexts of multiple pressures. From empirical findings it shows how urban nature contributes to mental wellbeing, but also how institutional stresses linked to austerity policies shape efforts to reconnect humans and nature. Across five strands of research, this article foregrounds the importance of multiple everyday experiences of urban nature and practices of care and maintenance. It calls on researchers, policymakers, planners and practitioners to pay closer attention to the ‘magic of the mundane’ in supporting human wellbeing; in caring for spaces and places; and in providing the services that link people and the natural environment.
    • Delivering patient centred care (Part 2): a qualitative study of the perceptions of service users and deliverers.

      Hyde, Emma; Hardy, Maryann; University of Derby; University of Bradford (Elsevier, 2020-10-07)
      There is growing awareness of the importance of patient centred care (PCC) in health care. Within Radiography in the UK, elements of PCC are embedded within professional body publications and guidance documents, but there is limited research evidence exploring whether perceptions of PCC are equivalent between those delivering (radiographers) and those experiencing (patient) care. This study aimed to address this gap by determining compatibility in perceptions of PCC between those using and those delivering radiography services in order to develop measurable indicators of PCC. This project was funded by the College of Radiographers Industry Partnership Scheme. Ethical approval was granted by the University of Derby College of Health & Social Care Ethics committee. This paper reports Stage 2 of the project, which was a series of focus groups and telephone interviews to enable deeper discussion and exploration of PCC. Situational vignettes were used to promote discussion and debate and encourage suggestions for PCC approaches. Audit tools to assess engagement with PCC were developed at individual and organisational level. Four focus groups and six telephone interviews were carried out in total. Focus groups were held in a variety of locations to promote attendance. Telephone interviews were used to capture participants who could not attend a focus group in person. Disparity between perceptions of service users and those delivering radiography services on what constitutes high quality PCC was evident. Perceived levels of care and the effectiveness of communication appeared to be the key influences on whether PCC was delivered. It is evident from the results of Stage 1 and Stage 2 that we have some way to go before we have parity in how care within diagnostic radiography is perceived, experienced and delivered. Audit tools and an educational toolkit are offered as ways to support increased PCC within diagnostic radiography practice. Several service improvements and audit tools are offered to support the increased delivery of PCC.
    • Crisis management for people with dementia at home: Mixed‐methods case study research to identify critical factors for successful home treatment

      Hopkinson, Jane; King, Amanda; Young, Lucy; McEwan, Kirsten; Elliot, Fiona; Hydon, Kate; Muthukrishnan, Sabarigirivasan; Tope, Rosie; Veitch, Anne; Howells, Cristie; et al. (Wiley, 2020-08-27)
      Best practice in dementia care is support in the home. Yet, crisis is common and can often result in hospital admission with adverse consequences. The objective of this mixed‐methods case study research was to identify the critical factors for resolving crisis for a person with dementia living at home. The research was an in‐depth investigation of what happens during crisis for people with dementia and how it is managed by a Home Treatment Crisis Team to resolution and outcome at 6 weeks and 6 months. The methods were; observation of crisis management for 15 patients with dementia (max three observations per patient, total 41), interviews with patients with dementia (n = 5), carers (n = 13) and professionals (n = 14, range one to six interviews per person, total 29), focus group (nine professionals), and extraction of demographics and medical history from medical records. Analysis focused on the identification of factors important for crisis resolution and avoidance of hospital admission. Critical factors for the Home Treatment Crisis Team to enable successful crisis resolution were: immediate action to reduce risk of harm, expertise in dementia care and carer education, communication skills to establish trust and promote benefits of home treatment, shared decision‐making, medication management, addressing the needs of carers independently of the person with dementia and, local availability of respite and other community services. The Home Treatment Crisis Team integrated the seven factors to deploy a biopsychosocial systems approach with embedded respect for personhood. This approach enabled crisis resolution for a person with dementia by creating a system of services, treatments, resources and relationships, ‘Safe Dementia Space’, in the community with avoidance of hospital admission in more than 80% of referrals. The identified critical factors for crisis resolution are important considerations in the design and delivery of home treatment services for people with dementia.
    • Patient centred care and considerations

      Hyde, Emma; University of Derby (CRC Press/ Routledge, 2020-07-15)
      This chapter shares the findings of a large scale research project into patient centred care in diagnostic radiography.
    • Cultivating learner aspirations and self-belief

      Jinks, Gavin; Harber, Denise; University of Derby (2020-07-13)
      The research team believes that to be a successful learner, the individual has to commit to the desired outcome in two ways: s/he has to want it, so it has to be relevant and important to her/him, and s/he has to believe that s/he can be successful. The team believe that both aspirations and self-belief are affected by personal influences, cultural/community influences and structural and societal influences. The team wishes to find reasons why significant numbers of school students don’t succeed in school, why many university students "drop out" of courses or don’t achieve the standard of which they are capable, and why adults fail to engage with the community activities. The team acknowledges that the influences on prospective learners of their families, their social and cultural groups, their local communities, and wider society in general are significant, but seek to establish whether low aspirations and poor self-belief are fixed or can be changed if leaders of learning and teachers create a culture of success in their settings, and develop a growth mindset in learners. This session explores the characteristics required for a positive learning culture, and the behaviours "teachers" might utilise in order to develop aspirations and self-belief in leaners.
    • Behaving professionally in an age of political and corporate nonsense

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (Human Givens Publishing, 2020-07-03)
      This article explores how a professional might practice in an ethical and value informed manner whilst also being able to subject to scrutiny practices that might be of questionable value. The background to this discussion is the exponential rise in digital communication and the rising power of large corporate organisations.
    • ‘Withness’: Creative spectating for residents living with advanced dementia in care homes

      Astell-Burt, Caroline; McNally, Theresa; Collard-Stokes, Gemma; Irons, J. Yoon; London School of Puppetry; University of Derby (Intellect, 2020-07-01)
      Aiming to illustrate the potential for puppetry as a useful resource in dementia care, the authors argue unusually that play with puppets derives not particularly from drama or theatre, but fundamentally from the performative relationship people have with objects. The puppeteers of the study achieved remarkable emotional connection with care-home residents through an experience of puppetry, which dissolved the unitary autonomy of the puppet, recontextualizing it relationally as the puppeteer-with-puppet-with-spectator. It is this ‘withness’ that ignited the creative spark of presence of the residents. For a moment of trust and child-like joy kinaesthetic memories stirred in them, appearing to break down emotional barriers between the person and the world around them and indicating comparatively longer-term therapeutic benefits.
    • Birth shock! What role might arts engagement have to play in antenatal and postnatal care?

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Intellect, 2020-06-17)
      This article shares research findings for an Arts and Humanities Research Council project called The Birth Project (grant ref. AH/K003364/1). The Birth Project has been particularly interested to explore women’s personal experience of birth and the transition to motherhood using the arts, within a participatory arts framework. It ran experiential art-based groups for mothers and a further group for birthing professionals, each over a twelve-week period to solicit in-depth qualitative data. An innovative aspect of this endeavour has been the use of film as research data, as a means of answering the research questions (through selective editing) and as the primary mode of dissemination of the research results. Results elaborated and summarized here explore the ways women and birthing professionals found the intervention useful. The project analyses the distinctive contribution of the arts and concludes that arts engagement can play a vital role in both antenatal and postnatal care.
    • Patient centred care in diagnostic radiography (Part 1): Perceptions of service users and service deliverers

      Hyde, Emma; Hardy, Maryann; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-06-13)
      There is growing awareness of the importance of patient centered care (PCC) in health care. Within Radiography in the UK, elements of PCC are embedded within professional body publications and guidance documents. However, there is limited research evidence exploring whether perceptions of PCC are equivalent between those delivering (radiographers) and those experiencing (patient) care. This study aimed to address this gap by determining compatibility in perceptions of PCC between those using and those delivering radiography services. This is the first step in developing measurable indicators of PCC in diagnostic radiography. A multi-method two stage approach was undertaken using survey and interview data collection techniques. Ethical approval was granted by University of Derby College of Health & Social Care Ethics committee. This paper reports Stage 1 of the study, the online, cross sectional survey. Participants were asked to indicate their level of agreement to a series of attitudinal statements using a 5-point Likert scale. Statements were paired, but not co-located to increase validity. Participants were invited to provide free text comments to supplement their responses. Stage 2 of the project is reported separately. Survey responses were received from all 3 participant subgroups. A minimum response rate of 30 participants per sub-group was set as a target. Response rates varied across subgroups, with only radiography managers failing to meet the expected response threshold. Wide disparity between perceptions of service users and those delivering radiography services on what constitutes high quality PCC was evident. It is evident that there is still work required to ensure parity between expectations of service users and deliverers on what constitutes high quality PCC. Further work is required to identify measurable service delivery outcomes that represent PCC within radiographic practice.
    • The schwartz center rounds: supporting mental health workers with the emotional impact of their work.

      Allen, Deborah; Spencer, Graham; McEwan, Kirsten; Catarino, Francisca; Evans, Rachael; Crooks, Sarah; Gilbert, Paul; University Hospitals Derby & Burton NHS; Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust; University of Derby (Wiley, 2020-05-15)
      In healthcare settings there is an emotional cost to caring which can result in compassion-fatigue, burnout, secondary trauma and compromised patient care. Innovative workplace interventions such as the Schwartz Rounds offer a group reflective practice forum for clinical and non-clinical professionals to reflect on the emotional aspects of working in healthcare. Whilst the Rounds are established in medical health practice, this study presents an evaluation of the Rounds offered to mental health services. The Rounds were piloted amongst 150 mental health professionals for 6 months and evaluated using a mixed-methods approach with standardised evaluation forms completed after each Round and a focus group (n=9) at one-month follow-up. This paper also offers a unique six-year follow-up of the evaluation of the Rounds. Rounds were rated as helpful, insightful, relevant and at six years follow-up Rounds were still rated as valuable and viewed as embedded. Focus groups indicated that Rounds were valued because of the opportunity to express emotions (in particular negative emotions towards patients that conflict with the professional care-role), share experiences, and feel validated and supported by colleagues. The findings indicate that Schwartz Rounds offer a positive application in mental healthcare settings. The study supports the use of interventions which provide an ongoing forum in which to discuss emotions, develop emotional literacy, provide peer-support and set an intention for becoming a more compassionate organisation in which to work.
    • Where the wild things are! Do urban green spaces with greater avian biodiversity promote more positive emotions in humans?

      Cameron, Ross; Brindley, Paul; Mears, Meagan; McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona; Sheffield, David; Jorgensen, Anna; Riley, J; Goodwick, J; Ballard, L; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-01-22)
      Urban green space can help mitigate the negative impacts of urban living and provide positive effects on citizens’ mood, health and well-being. Questions remain, however, as to whether all types of green space are equally beneficial, and if not, what landscape forms or key features optimise the desired benefits. For example, it has been cited that urban landscapes rich in wildlife (high biodiversity) may promote more positive emotions and enhance well-being. This research utilised a mobile phone App, employed to assess people’s emotions when they entered any one of 945 green spaces within the city of Sheffield, UK. Emotional responses were correlated to key traits of the individual green spaces, including levels of biodiversity the participant perceived around them. For a subsample of these green spaces, actual levels of biodiversity were assessed through avian and habitat surveys. Results demonstrated strong correlations between levels of avian biodiversity within a green space and human emotional response to that space. Respondents reported being happier in sites with greater avian biodiversity (p < 0.01, r = 0.78) and a greater variety of habitats (p < 0.02, r = 0.72). Relationships were strengthened when emotions were linked to perceptions of overall biodiversity (p < 0.001, r = 0.89). So, when participants thought the site was wildlife rich, they reported more positive emotions, even when actual avian biodiversity levels were not necessarily enhanced. The data strengthens the arguments that nature enhances well-being through positive affect, and that increased ‘engagement with nature’ may help support human health within urban environments. The results have strong implications for city planning with respect to the design, management and use of city green spaces.
    • Assessing the feasibility of public engagement in a smartphone app to: improve wellbeing through nature connection and map wellbeing across urban green spaces

      McEwan, Kirsten; Richardson, Miles; Sheffield, David; Ferguson, Fiona; Brindley, Paul; University of Derby; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2020)
      Aside from practical interventions such as providing green infrastructure to improve air quality or water contamination and reduce flooding, wellbeing interventions to increase engagement with the natural environment are one of the fastest growing ways of improving human and environmental health. This feasibility study assessed a novel Smartphone app wellbeing intervention. Over 30 days the app prompted adults, including those seeking help for a common mental health problem, to notice the good things about urban green or built spaces (control condition). Self-referral was successful with 885 people downloading the app, 435 supplying baseline data and 50 supplying post-intervention data. However, the low number of observations (M=6 per participant) indicates that 30 days is too long to remain engaged. There were significant improvements in wellbeing and nature connection, but no difference between green and built space conditions. Limitations, future recommendations regarding improving engagement and marketing to lower socio-economic status groups are discussed.
    • A feasibility study of non-invasive continuous estimation of brachial pressure derived from arterial and venous lines during dialysis

      Stewart, Jill; Walker, Thomas; Eldehini, Tarek; Horner, Daniela Viramontes; Lucas, Bethany; White, Kelly; Muggleton, Andy; Selby, Nicholas M; Taal, Martin W; Stewart, Paul; et al. (IEEE, 2020)
      Intradialytic haemodynamic instability is a significant clinical problem, leading to end-organ ischaemia and contributing to morbidity and mortality in haemodialysis patients. Non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring is not part of routine practice but may aid detection and prevention of significant falls in blood pressure during dialysis. Brachial blood pressure is currently recorded intermittently during haemodialysis via a sphygmomanometer. Current methods of continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring tend to restrict movement, can be sensitive to external disturbances and patient movement, and can be uncomfortable for the wearer. Additionally, poor patient blood circulation can lead to unreliable measurements. In this study we performed an initial validation of a novel method and associated technology via a feasibility study to continuously estimate blood pressure using pressure sensors in the extra-corporeal dialysis circuit, which does not require any direct contact with the person receiving dialysis treatment.\\ The paper describes the development of the measurement system and subsequent \emph{in vivo} patient feasibility study with concurrent measurement validation by \emph{Finapres Nova} experimental physiological measurement device. We identify a mathematical function to describe the relationship between arterial line pressure and brachial artery BP, which is confirmed in the patient study. The methodology presented requires no interfacing to proprietery dialysis machine systems, no sensors to be attached to the patient directly, and to be robust to patient movement during treatment and also to the effects of the cyclical pressure waveforms induced by the hemodialysis pump. This represents a key enabling factor to the development of a practical continuous blood pressure monitoring device for dialysis patients.
    • Shifting identities: exploring occupational identity for those in recovery from an eating disorder

      Dark, Esther; Carter, Sarah; University of Derby (Emerald, 2019-11-23)
      The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature, transition and formation of occupational identity for those in recovery from eating disorders (EDs). Semi-structured “episodic” interviews were carried out with six women, self-identifying in recovery from an ED. Narrative-type-analysis produced a distilled narrative of participant’s accounts, before use of thematic analysis compared and extracted pertinent themes. During recovery from an ED, significant shifts occurred in occupational identities, moving from sole identification with the ED, to a greater understanding of self; facilitated by increased engagement in meaningful occupations, adapting occupational meaning, connecting with self and others and the importance of becoming and belonging. This is the first known piece of research exploring occupational identity in relation to EDs. The findings are applicable to occupational therapists and add to the growing body of qualitative research into ED's.
    • The good things in urban nature: A thematic framework for optimising urban planning for nature connectedness

      McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona J; Richardson, Miles; Cameron, Ross; University of Derby (2019-11-06)
      Green interventions which connect people with nature to improve wellbeing are increasingly being applied to tackle the current crisis in mental health. A novel Smartphone app intervention was evaluated amongst adults (n = 228) including (n = 53) adults with common mental health problems, with the aim to improve wellbeing through noticing the good things about urban nature. The app prompted participants once a day over 7 days to write notes about the good things they noticed in urban green spaces. Notes were thematically analysed and ten themes emerged. The three themes with the greatest representation were: i) wonder at encountering wildlife in day-to-day urban settings; ii) appreciation of street trees; and iii) awe at colourful, expansive, dramatic skies and views. Through combining the above themes with the pathways to nature connectedness this paper provides an extended framework of activities to inform activity programming, nature engagement media content, and ‘green health’ interventions. Moreover, the findings have strong implications for optimising city planning, design and management for the wellbeing of both humans and wildlife.
    • Patient involvement in pressure ulcer prevention and adherence to prevention strategies: An integrative review

      Ledger, Lisa; Worsley, Peter; Hope, Jo; Schoonhoven, Lisette; University of Derby; University of Southampton; Utrecht University (Elsevier, 2019-10-14)
      Chronic wounds including pressure ulcers represent a significant burden to patients and healthcare providers. Increasingly patients are required to self-manage their care but patient adherence to prevention strategies is a significant clinical challenge. It is important to increase understanding of the factors affecting patients’ ability and willingness to follow pressure ulcer prevention interventions. To investigate from a patient perspective the factors affecting adherence to pressure ulcer prevention strategies. Integrative Literature Review Data Sources: A systematic search of electronic databases (Athens, Pub Med, Web of Science, Science Direct, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo, Google Scholar, Delphis) was initially conducted in May 2017 (repeated August 2018). The methodological quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) principles. The Noticing, Collecting, Thinking (NCT) model of qualitative data analysis was used to identify key themes. A total of twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The majority of studies were qualitative and three key themes were identified: i) individual/daily lifestyle considerations, ii) patient involvement in the decision-making process, and iii) pain and/or discomfort. There is limited research that focuses on the patient view of factors affecting adherence to prevention measures, particularly in community settings. Individual and daily lifestyle considerations and involvement in decision-making around pressure ulcer care are important aspects from the patient perspective. Further research is necessary to explore which factors affect patient adherence in order to improve clinical practice and support patient involvement in preventative strategies.