• Are you using simulation in radiography? If not, why not?

      Shiner, Naomi; University of Derby (2018-01-31)
    • Can simulation impact on first year diagnostic radiography students' emotional preparedness to encounter open wounds on their first clinical placement: A pilot study

      Shiner, Naomi; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-05-11)
      This study reports on the use of moulage within a simulation to introduce first year diagnostic radiography students to open wounds in preparation for clinical practice. A mixed-method quasi-experimental design was used. Visual Analogue Scales were used to capture state feelings at the point of seeing open wounds. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to draw themes from focus groups and an interview following clinical placement. The simulation reduced negative feelings whilst emotional preparedness, distraction and excitement increased. Five major themes were identified including emotional engagement, engagement with wound, building relationships, developing professional self and simulation impact. The use of moulage and a simulation provides an opportunity to explore initial reactions. Students actively reflect on this experience during clinical practice changing practice. The impact of open wounds can be long lasting and support from radiographers should allow these new experiences to be processed reducing the risk of burnout.
    • Evaluation of shared placements between MSc Pre-Registration and BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography students.

      Partner, Alexandra; Shiner, Naomi; Hyde, Emma; University of Derby (National Association Educators in Practice (NAEP), 2018-04-20)
      Background A new two year Masters (pre-registration) Diagnostic Radiography programme was introduced in 2016 at the University. It is one of only 4 courses of this type in the country. To date no literature has been published to evaluate the impact of such a course. The Masters students (level 7) share multiple teaching sessions with the undergraduate students (level 4); mixed level teaching is a new development for the current academic team. These cohorts undertake their clinical placement at the same NHS site over the same time period. This has provided an opportunity to evaluate the perceptions, expectations and experiences of the students learning together on placement. Aims To evaluate the shared placement experience of MSc (Pre-Registration) Diagnostic Radiography and BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography from their perspective Method The study used a questionnaire design to gather quantitative and qualitative data from all groups. Both the MSc (n=5) and BSc (n=38) students were included to provide comparative data. This will be enriched with qualitative data gained from small focus groups undertaken at the end of the MSc shared placement block. Analysis: Analysis is ongoing but provisional results from the BSc students is that the presence of level 7 MSc students within the classroom is enjoyable and adds depth to the learning as they pose more challenging questions. Working together on placement has been a positive experience. Conclusion Mixed level teaching enriches discussion within the classroom, is more time and cost efficient. The addition of the MSc Pre-Registration Fast Track Diagnostic Radiography has increased student numbers without significantly impacting on capacity, whilst addressing the local workforce needs. The results of the study will form part of the programme evaluation and provides opportunity to develop the curriculum in close partnership with placement providers.
    • Is there a role for simulation based education within conventional diagnostic radiography? A literature review

      Shiner, Naomi; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2018-02-07)
      Simulation based education is advancing, but is there a role for it in Diagnostic Radiography? The aim of this literature review was to understand the use of simulation within conventional diagnostic radiography education to raise awareness of this pedagogical approach. Objectives were to identify the prevalence and stage of delivery in education; understand the variation of simulation and learning objectives informing its use; and review the perceptions of those using simulation in education and practice. The literature review used a systematic search strategy. Library Plus, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Medline and Google Scholar were reviewed resulting in 703 articles. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied with initial review of title and abstract resulting in 22 articles. Fifteen articles were selected following full text review. Simulation was used for both pre-and post-registration education. Themes included inter-professional education, use of computer software and improving patient/practitioner interactions. Increased confidence and understanding of professional roles were common outcomes. Simulation is a valuable pedagogical approach for diagnostic radiography education. Staff training and careful implementation of each stage is required to achieve desired learning outcomes.
    • An overview of the types and applications of simulation-based education within diagnostic radiography and ultrasound at two higher education institutions

      Shiner, Naomi; Pantic, V; University of Derby; University of Leeds (The Society of Radiographers: Deeson Publishing, 2019-06-02)
      The aim of this research was to explore the use of SBE across two HEIs delivering diagnostic radiography and ultrasound programmes; to inform, inspire and encourage educators across HEIs and in clinical practice to implement the use of SBE to support students in their learning.
    • The use of simulation and moulage in undergraduate diagnostic radiography education: A burns scenario

      Shiner, Naomi; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-01-08)
      There is a national drive to increase allied health professions simulation training. However, there is a paucity of literature within diagnostic radiography in relation to clinical simulation. No research could be found regarding the impact of simulation in radiography with complex clinical burns scenarios.This research aims to explore the perceptions of radiography undergraduate students regarding their preparedness for the complex care requirements in imaging examinations of clinical burns cases using a mixed methods approach. A small-scale simulation-based teaching session was developed in a Scottish HEI, using role play and moulage to create realism. Twenty-eight undergraduate student radiographers participated in the scenario. Students completed pre- and post-scenario questionnaires using Likert scale and free response data. Focus groups were undertaken three months after the simulation to obtain rich qualitative data. Common themes were identified via a process of initial coding and a 6-phase thematic analysis. Thematic analysis demonstrated a marked increased perception of preparedness post-scenario; students felt more prepared to undertake their role in the imaging of complex care patients (Likert scoring increased with both mode and median post-scenario). Common themes that were identified were patient centeredness, realism and learning. Within this limited pilot project, the use of simulation was an effective means of preparing students to understand their role within the complex care setting (with respect to the traumatic realism of burns) in preparedness for professional practice. Additionally, students related to the practical understanding of the complexity of human factors that exist within clinical practice.