• Assessment by discussion

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (2016-07-04)
    • Cultivating self-belief

      Jinks, Gavin; Harber, Denise; University of Derby (International conference on education and new developments, 2019-06)
      The two presenters have very different backgrounds. Gavin Jinks is a senior lecturer in social work. Denise Harber has been a teacher, head-teacher and school adviser. Both have concluded that the ability to create self-belief in a student group, be they primary school pupils or students in higher education, is fundamental to their achievements. Gavin has been the project leader for an award winning student mentoring project on the BA Applied Social Work at the University of Derby. Denise Harber was an adviser on a team that designated a primary school in the south of England as a 'cause for concern'. She then took on the role of Head-teacher and led the school to be designated as good in a subsequent Ofsted inspection. Underpinning both of these pieces of work was a commitment to develop the self-belief of the students. This was seen as being a fundamental building block in bringing about real change in the achievements of both the students and the pupils concerned. This workshop will explore how Gavin and Denise went about these pieces of work. They will explore the transferability of these ideas to other educational settings and situations, particularly settings with traditionally low academic engagement. They will also be encouraging participants to consider how it might be possible for them to cultivate a culture of self-belief in their own students/pupils.
    • Learning imaginatively in higher education

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (Human Givens Publishing, 2017-06-01)
    • A partnership approach to student mentoring

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Forum for Peer Learning, 2019-06)
      In 2015 as Year 1 Tutor on the BA Applied Social Work I initiated a student mentoring project with the aim of increasing the support to Year 1 students. In that first year I recruited 5 student mentors from Years 2 and 3 to support incoming Year 1 students. Fast forward to 2018 and the project has grown very significantly. There are now 42 mentors, they are Year 2 and Year 3 students with a handful of graduates now in employment. Mentoring is now offered to students on all 3 years of the programme. The mentor support has a number of strands to it: A Facebook group for each of the 3 years of the programme. The Facebook group for each year has mentors from the year above so that students can raise questions and queries with peers who have the ‘been there, done that’ factor. The Facebook groups are not overseen by academic staff. This highlights a fundamental element of the project, that mentors are trusted to undertake the role. The Year 1 Facebook group is set up in the summer before their studies commence. Induction for Year 1 and Year 2 students is largely run by mentors. The mentors create activities and presentations for mentees on a range of topics. Again the mentors are trusted to prepare and present these presentations without academic interference. All Year 1 and Year 2 students have a named mentor who they can contact for guidance when they would like to talk to a peer rather than a tutor. Students who have been very successful in module assessments are invited to give guidance to students undertaking those modules the following year. All decision are made between myself and the mentors. The project won a Union of Students award in 2018.
    • Record, pause, rewind: a low tech approach to teaching communication (and other) skills.

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Perspectives In Education Conference 2018, 2018-10)
      Over the last 3 years I have developed a technique for teaching communication skills on the BA Applied Social Work programme at the University of Derby. The idea for the technique was originally based on a skills course I attended which involved the use of video recording equipment. I took the view that I could achieve similar results simply by asking participants to imagine that they were being recorded! The technique involves students working with a facilitator in groups of approximately 12. They are asked to come prepared to demonstrate their skills with a character from a case study they are familiar with. The character is played by an actor (usually a member of staff). One person from the group volunteers or is asked to play the role of the professional. All are asked to imagine that once the conversation starts the scenario is being recorded on video. At any point the ‘volunteer’ can say “pause” and ask for help from everyone else. The facilitator can also pause in order to make some learning points. And those watching can pause to make suggestions or comments. The technique also allows pauses to be used to ask the ‘actor’ playing the client how they feel about the conversation. The technique allows real time ‘reflection in action’ in a safe environment. After reflection a decision is frequently made to rewind to an earlier point in the conversation to see what happens if the ‘volunteer’ tries a different approach. The technique has proved extremely popular as a learning tool and could be applied to the teaching of a wide range of skills.
    • Self-belief in education

      Jinks, Gavin; Harber, Denise; University of Derby (Human Givens Publishing, 2018-12)
    • Student mentoring and peer learning.

      Jinks, Gavin; Maneely-Edmunds, Carl; University of Derby (2018-03-27)
      A presentation exploring the implementation of a student mentoring and peer learning project on the BA Social Work programme at the University of Derby
    • Student Mentoring and peer learning: a partnership approach.

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Perspectives In Education Conference 2018, 2018-10)
      In 2015 I initiated a student mentoring and peer assisted learning project for year 1 students on the BA Applied Social Work at the University of Derby. Initially this was a small and low key idea. I recruited 5 students from the 2nd and 3rd years to run a short session during induction week and to be contactable so that the new year 1s could raise any questions and queries which they preferred not to raise with tutors. On review discussions with both mentors and mentees indicated that year 1 students wanted to have a significantly developed student mentoring scheme. The following year 19 further mentors were recruited from year 1 in order to develop the project. Mentors took responsibility for 2 full days of student induction. A number of mentor led presentations were delivered during Induction Week on a range of topics. They also took responsibility for setting up and managing a Facebook group for the new year 1 students. The Facebook group was set up in the summer before the new year 1s began the degree programme and allowed information to be given to new students as well as providing an opportunity for the new students to raise questions with their peers in years 2 and 3. Student mentors were also involved in providing assignment guidance to year 1 students for subjects in which those mentors had been very successful. Mentors were also involved in co-teaching module learning input for topics in which they had demonstrated significant knowledge or expertise. As we move into the 3rd year of the project the plan is to expand the remit so that year 2 students also receive mentoring from year 3 mentors. There is also a plan for the creation of mentor led study groups. A ‘mentor away day’ will take place in May 2018 to review the project so far and plan for the forthcoming academic year. A key feature of the approach taken is that decisions are based on a partnership between myself and the student mentors. Decision making is based on consensus and mentors have significant responsibility for their input. Another key finding thus far has been the enthusiasm with which those invited to take on the student mentor role have responded. The philosophy of partnership has undoubtedly resulted in mentors articulating a real sense of ownership regarding the project and its development. Equally striking has been the sense of being valued that mentors experience.
    • Student mentoring: An exploration of the benefits of student mentors for year 1 students on an undergraduate programme.

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2017-11)
      In 2015 I introduced the idea of student mentors for year 1 students on the BA Applied Social Work at the University of Derby. This was a small and low key idea. I recruited 5 students from the 2nd and 3rd years to run a short session during induction week and to be contactable so that new year 1s could raise questions and queries which they preferred not to raise with tutors. Discussions with all involved indicated that year 1 students wanted to have a significantly developed student mentoring scheme. So this year 19 further mentors have been recruited from current year 1 in order to develop the scheme. For 2017-18 the mentors are taking responsibility for 2 full days of student induction. They are taking responsibility for setting up and managing a Facebook group for the new year 1 students. This group will allow information to be given to new students as well as providing an opportunity for them to raise questions. Student mentors will also be involved in providing assignment guidance to year 1 students for subjects in which those mentors have been very successful. A key finding thus far has been the enthusiasm with which those invited to take on the student mentor role have responded. Keywords: