• “Age is just a number, init?”: Interrogating perceptions of age and women within social gerontology

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-02-25)
      The article discusses social gerontology and mentions age and women. Topics discussed include social relations, self-identity and ageing. Other topics which includes women's bodies, menopause and feminism are also discussed. Ethnography, marginalization and sexual attraction towards women are also mentioned.
    • Art elicitation. Exploring the birth experience

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-10-27)
      In The Birth Project we are exploring women’s experience of childbirth and the transition to motherhood using the arts and then presenting the research findings in films and exhibitions. Our overarching research question wishes to explore what role arts engagement might have to play in antenatal and postnatal provision, especially where post-birth trauma is being translated into bodily symptoms. The Birth Project is also interested in investigating to what extent clinically-related birth practices are implicated in iatrogenic outcomes and post-natal distress. Furthermore, we are also concerned to investigate what is distinctive about an arts-based approach in terms of expressing narratives about birth and the transition to motherhood, so we are interested in thinking about different sorts of arts-based methods. This film is about the art elicitation group which comprised a group of mothers who had been traumatised by their birth experience. The group and was facilitated by a Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC, UK) registered art therapist and used a used a thematic approach, as this was felt to offer necessary containment for the strong feelings being expressed.
    • Art therapy theories: A critical introduction

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
      Art therapists work with a range of distinct philosophical and theoretical underpinnings, but as yet there has been no single book to offer an overview of these theories. Art Therapy Theories provides an introductory, non-partisan overview of art therapy theories outlining the following therapy approaches: Cognitive Behavioural Art Therapy Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Psychoanalytical (Freudian) Art Therapy Analytical (Jungian) Art Therapy Gestalt Art Therapy Person-Centred or ‘Rogerian’ Art Therapy Mindfulness Art Therapy Integrative Art Therapy (the Group-Interactive Model) Feminist Art Therapy Art Therapy as Social Action Art Therapy as a Research Tool Each chapter provides a non-judgemental, yet analytical, synopsis of each approach. No detailed knowledge is necessary to understand the different approaches, as the book explains them in clear and concise English. Difficult terms and concepts are explained as they arise, and a glossary of terms is also provided. Art Therapy Theories is aimed at trainee art therapists who need to demonstrate that they have a grasp of theory, as well as a sense of how the theory can translate into practice. It will also appeal to seasoned therapists, counsellors and to a wide range of professionals in the mental health field.
    • Arts, health & wellbeing: reflections on a national seminar series and building a UK research network

      Stickley, Theo; Parr, Hester; Atkinson, Sarah; Daykin, Norma; Clift, Stephen; De Nora, Tia; Hacking, Sue; Camic, Paul M; Joss, Tim; White, Mike; et al. (Taylor and Francis, 2016-05-10)
      An account is provided of a UK national seminar series on Arts, Health and Wellbeing funded by the Economic and Social Research Council during 2012–13. Four seminars were organised addressing current issues and challenges facing the field. Details of the programme and its outputs are available online. A central concern of the seminar programme was to provide a foundation for creating a UK national network for researchers in the field to help promote evidence-based policy and practice. With funding from Lankelly Chase Foundation, and the support of the Royal Society for Public Health, a Special interest Group for Arts, Health and Wellbeing was launched in 2015.
    • Birth professionals make art. Using participatory arts to think about being a birthing professional

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-10-27)
      Midwifery and obstetric practices, within a stressful period of austerity for the NHS with litigation fears and pressure from the media, have an impact on the experience of all those involved: women giving birth and birthing professionals. In The Birth Project the arts are being used to interrogate this complex topic. Obstetricians, midwives, and new mothers have been given the opportunity to explore their experiences of compassion fatigue, stress, birth suffering and post-natal readjustments using the arts. These different groups have joined together in ‘mutual recovery’ events in which perspectives have been shared, primarily through elucidation of the art works produced, captured using documentary filmmaking. The raison d’etre of this project is to create dialogue between different communities of interest and experience, to use the arts to interrogate discourses, to challenge embedded assumptions, and in this process, to stimulate mutual recovery between all those who experience and are affected by birth. We situate this endeavour in the context of an emerging practice of health humanities (Crawford et al. 2014). A series of workshops with birth professionals, including professional doulas, who may have experienced vicarious trauma, whose traumatising experience is often overlooked, have used the arts to explore their experiences. This film narrates their concerns and reveals their artistic engagement.
    • The Birth Project: Using the Arts to explore birth. Interim report

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-10)
      The aim of this study was to use the arts to interrogate birth discourses, to challenge embedded assumptions, and in this process, to stimulate mutual recovery between all those who experience and are affected by birth. The research questions are: • What role might arts engagement have to play in ante-natal and post-natal care? • To what extent are hospital practices, that are iatrogenic in nature, implicated in post-natal distress? • To what extent is ‘mutual recovery’ possible through engagement with the arts, and if so, to establish what form this may take? • What, in particular, does an arts-based approach offer in exploring birth experiences and the transition to motherhood?
    • Birth shock: exploring pregnancy, birth and the transition to motherhood using participatory arts

      Hogan, Susan; Baker, C.; Cornish, Shelagh; McCloskey, Paula; Watts, Lisa; University of Derby,; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (Demeter Press, 2015-09)
      Natal Signs: Cultural Representations of Pregnancy, Birth and Parenting explores some of the ways in which reproductive experiences are taken up in the rich arena of cultural production. The chapters in this collection pose questions, unsettle assumptions, and generate broad imaginative spaces for thinking about representation of pregnancy, birth, and parenting. They demonstrate the ways in which practices of consuming and using representations carry within them the productive forces of creation. Bringing together an eclectic and vibrant range of perspectives, this collection offers readers the possibility to rethink and reimagine the diverse meanings and practices of representations of these significant life events. Engaging theoretical reflection and creative image making, the contributors explore a broad range of cultural signs with a focus on challenging authoritative representations in a manner that seeks to reveal rather than conceal the insistently problematic and contestable nature of image culture. Natal Signs gathers an exciting set of critically engaged voices to reflect on some of life’s most meaningful moments in ways that affirm natality as the renewed promise of possibility.
    • Community-based Arts and health in Britain

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 01-08-2017)
    • Creative ageing: the social policy challenge.

      Hogan, Susan; Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018)
    • Gender representation, power and identity in mental health and art therapy.

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12-14)
    • Interrogating women’s experience of ageing: reinforcing or challenging clichés?

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (2015-07)
      The “Representing Self—Representing Ageing” initiative has been funded by the ESRC as part of the New Dynamics of Ageing cross-council research programme. It has consisted of four projects with older women using participatory arts to enable women to articulate their experiences of ageing, and to create alternative images of ageing. Methods have included the use of art elicitation, photo-diaries, film-booths, directed photography, and phototherapy.
    • The introductory guide to art therapy

      Hogan, Susan; Coulter, A.; University of Derby,; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (Routledge, 2014)
      Foreword by Professor Judy Rubin. Introduction. What is Art Therapy? On Experiential Learning. An Introduction to Art Therapy. Becoming an Art Therapy Practitioner. Teaching Art Therapy to Allied Health Professionals. Innovative Teaching Strategies. An Overview of Models of Art Therapy. The Role of the Image in Art Therapy & Intercultural Reflections. Working as an Art Therapist with Children. Working as an Art Therapist with Offenders. Art Therapy with Couples and Families. Group Work with Adults. Art Therapy and Co-therapy. Starting Supervision. Models of Supervision & Personal Therapy. International Perspectives. A Critical Glossary of Key Terms.
    • Lost in translation? Inter-cultural exchange in art therapy

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; Health & Social Care Research Centre (Charles C. Thomas Publishers, 2015)
      This exciting text is a comprehensive work that examines the use of art, play, music, dance/movement, and drama in different cultures and with diverse client populations. The editors’ primary purpose is to explore how the creative therapies can be implemented in diverse cultures and in different countries. Renowned, well-credentialed, and professional creative arts therapists in the areas of art, play, music, dance/movement, and drama helped write this collection. Examples include the use of art in working with refugee children in Australia and with Chinese-American children; shared experiences in using dance and movement with Arabic women in Jerusalem, indigenous Inner Mongolia, and with survivors of torture. Other chapters offer stories of using drama in the Netherlands, music and other creative arts in China, play therapy in Appalachia and with different races. Additionally, there are chapters on working with children with learning disabilities as well as the use of creative arts in supervision. Some of the chapters are beautifully complimented with photographs of client works of art or play. The text provides a rich tapestry on how the creative therapies can be used across cultures for issues such as depression and trauma to name a few. Of special interest are the chapters on supervision. Not only a tool for creative art therapists, this informative book will be of special interest to educators, students, therapists, as well as people working in other parts of the world or with culturally diverse clients.
    • Mothers make art

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-10-27)
      In The Birth Project we are exploring women’s experience of childbirth and the transition to motherhood using the arts and then presenting the research findings in films and exhibitions. Our overarching questions are concerned to explore what role arts engagement might have to play in antenatal and postnatal provision, especially where post-birth trauma is being translated into bodily symptoms. The Birth Project is also interested in exploring to what extent clinically-related birth practices are implicated in iatrogenic outcomes and post-natal distress. Furthermore, we are also concerned to investigate what is distinctive about an arts-based approach in terms of expressing narratives about the transition to motherhood. Two sets of workshops have been run to-date for The Birth Project. A participatory arts group, 'Mothers Make Art', has been facilitated by the artist Lisa Watts. Watts has a distinctive art practice called Live Art, described by Gorman as ‘an art practice that presents the living body to encourage a self-reflective exploration of subjectivity, art and knowledge production’ (2014 p.6). One aspect of this way of working is that is ‘engages with how the audience experiences the performing body’s interaction with objects and materials’ (Watts 2010 p.2). Mothers Make Art, asks questions in two ways: what are the effects of participation in workshops for the makers of the art and then what are the effects on others who experience the art that is produced as viewers. The Mothers Make Art group comprised eight women who live in a city in the north of England. They self-selected to participate in a series of twelve workshops. Some of the women were trained in the arts, some not, but all had an interest in visual arts, and an openness to learn and to make. The brief was to use a participatory framework to enable the women to explore any topics they wished with respect to the birth experience and motherhood. In Mothers Make Art structured techniques were used to enable the participants to explore the nature of meaning making and to construct and deconstruct works (physically and metaphorically). An important method employed was the use of everyday objects, (ornaments, clothing, mothering paraphernalia, toys), to help to create stories. There was also an opportunity to be meditative with everyday objects (cling-film, tin-foil, kitchen paper). Rather than making a representation or literal object referring to their birth or mothering, the women focused on the formal aesthetic qualities of the materials. This way of working explores objects with a focus on their material capabilities, rather than having a predetermined vision of where the art making might lead. This not only provided a self-reflective space, but functioned to give the women the skills and confidence to manipulate materials to be able to create their own original art piece at the end of the series. The art works were varied; one women pegged up her boys clothes from the tiny newborn garments to the larger ones representing fads and crazes. She acknowledged the preciousness of each stage with an acute awareness of the fleeting nature of the experience, a heightened awareness of temporality, with poems and a monologue. Another of the installation pieces explored the maker’s sense of stability, with a series of finely balanced and delicately poised fragile mixed-media pieces, comprising living plant bulbs, glass and plastic containers, wire and wood and other materials. Rachel, a medical consultant, spoke of valuing the time and space to make art work. She said that the work was about seeking equilibrium between the domestic, professional and personal realms of her life, as well as exploring notions of what it is to be a good mother. She invited the group to say what her piece evoked: precariousness, balance, complexity, giving the bulbs space to grow, were a few of the reactions.
    • Mothers make art: using participatory art to explore the transition to motherhood

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; Health & Social Care Research Centre (Intellect and International Expressive Arts Therapy Association., 2015-06-01)
      This article explores the use of visual methods to explore women’s experience of pregnancy, childbirth and the adjustment to motherhood in a British context; it is particularly interested in thinking about whether visual methods can help deliver new insights into these experiences and what forms these might take. The work is not making universal claims about maternal experience, but rather is interested in the vibrancy, intensity and freshness that visual methods can bring to elucidate human experience.
    • Peripheries and borders: Pushing the boundaries of visual research

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby,; Health & Social Care Research Centre (Taylor and Francis, 2013-07)
      In my last paper for Inscape, ‘Ways in Which Photographic and Other Images are Used in Research: An Introductory Overview’ (July, 2012), I summarised the ways in which the arts are being used by social scientists. In this paper I look at less mainstream developments which are nevertheless of interest. In particular, I outline Iain Edgar's idea of ‘imagework’, which is the use of creative visualisation within research processes (although much of what he does is rather akin to some forms of art therapy). Probably less well documented and explored is the interesting borderline between social science research and personal therapy represented by both social art therapy and phototherapy, both of which will be explored in further detail. This paper is then contextualised with reference to other recent papers discussing the potential contribution of art therapy to social science, psychological and ethnographic research projects.
    • The tyranny of expectations of post-natal delight: gendered happiness

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-09-30)
      This article explores the contested nature of childbirth practices with a historical perspective. The article discusses the modern medical/interventionist model of birth now predominant in the UK and examines the consequences of prevailing norms for women. It includes some reflections on the regulation of pregnancy and the transition to motherhood and notes some counter-cultural movements such as ‘free-birthing’.
    • Unpacking gender in art therapy: The elephant at the art therapy easel

      Hogan, Susan; Cornish, Shelagh; University of Derby,; Health & Social Care Research Centre (2014-10-28)
      A national survey of registered art therapists in Britain was undertaken to create both quantitative and qualitative data about how ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation influence the therapeutic relationship. A tick-box scale was used alongside more open questions. This article presents the initial findings of the research and will focus on gender issues in the art therapy relationship; it will elucidate some of the ways in which art therapists conceptualise gender in the therapeutic alliance. The research indicates that the overwhelming majority of art therapists think that their own gender is very important to the therapeutic encounter. The personal preference of the client, personal history and presenting issues, which may be gender related, are highlighted by both male and female respondents. Art therapists seek to be aware and non-judgemental regarding gender. An interesting finding highlights that the transference gender might not correspond to the biological sex, suggesting that some art therapists have a ‘mobile’ understanding of gender, and are keen not to foreclose conceptual possibilities because of gender. This would also seem to indicate a permeation of postmodernist ideas into art therapy thinking.
    • The value of art therapy in antenatal and postnatal care: A brief literature review with recommendations for future research

      Hogan, Susan; Sheffield, David; Woodward, Amelia; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2017-09-01)
      There is a very small body of literature addressing the use of the arts or art therapy in antenatal and post-natal care, and much of it is qualitative, including some rich and complex data which is worthy of discussion and consideration. Overall, it points to a promising use of supportive and therapeutic arts in this area. This article presents some background on the use of the arts specifically focusing on post-natal depression and birth trauma. It then moves on to present a brief survey of literature in the field, followed by some further reflections and discussion about further research needed to establish clinical utility and economic viability.
    • Women’s inequality: a global problem explored in participatory arts.

      Hogan, Susan; Warren, Lorna; University of Derby,; College of Health & Social Research Centre (UNESCO, 2013-11)
      This paper discusses research-guided practice in community-based arts in health activity in Britain. This discussion is situated within an exploration of health policy and its relationship to the arts in health. It provides a summary analysis of a large body of research relevant to wellbeing and mental-health rehabilitation; it will describe how community-based arts in health activity provides the basis for a set of evidence-based actions to improve well-being. In respect to research-guided practice, this paper will argue a strong case that community-based arts in health initiatives encompass all aspects of the ‘Five Ways to Wellbeing’; furthermore, it will indicate how community arts in health activities are also significant in aiding recovery from mental ill health. The essay moves on to explore why participatory approaches are of particular value to women. In particular, the paper looks at the position of older women, with reference to the New Dynamics of Ageing Programme in Britain. It concludes with a detailed discussion of several recent projects. A description of the research inquiry will enable the partnership structures and the ethos developed in the projects’ delivery to be elucidated and discussed in order to interrogate strategies of practice. It is hoped that this frank discussion of some of the tensions between arts-based participatory practice and arts-based participatory practice for research will be of interest. Different visual methods will be articulated. Methods have included the use of art elicitation, photo-diaries, film-booths, directed photography, and re-enactment phototherapy within an overarching participatory framework. It is recognised that women are a highly diversified group with crosscutting allegiances, some of which have been acknowledged in this project.