• Lost in translation? Inter-cultural exchange in art therapy

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; Health & Social Care Research Centre (Charles C. Thomas Publishers, 2015)
      This exciting text is a comprehensive work that examines the use of art, play, music, dance/movement, and drama in different cultures and with diverse client populations. The editors’ primary purpose is to explore how the creative therapies can be implemented in diverse cultures and in different countries. Renowned, well-credentialed, and professional creative arts therapists in the areas of art, play, music, dance/movement, and drama helped write this collection. Examples include the use of art in working with refugee children in Australia and with Chinese-American children; shared experiences in using dance and movement with Arabic women in Jerusalem, indigenous Inner Mongolia, and with survivors of torture. Other chapters offer stories of using drama in the Netherlands, music and other creative arts in China, play therapy in Appalachia and with different races. Additionally, there are chapters on working with children with learning disabilities as well as the use of creative arts in supervision. Some of the chapters are beautifully complimented with photographs of client works of art or play. The text provides a rich tapestry on how the creative therapies can be used across cultures for issues such as depression and trauma to name a few. Of special interest are the chapters on supervision. Not only a tool for creative art therapists, this informative book will be of special interest to educators, students, therapists, as well as people working in other parts of the world or with culturally diverse clients.
    • Mothers make art: using participatory art to explore the transition to motherhood

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; Health & Social Care Research Centre (Intellect and International Expressive Arts Therapy Association., 2015-06-01)
      This article explores the use of visual methods to explore women’s experience of pregnancy, childbirth and the adjustment to motherhood in a British context; it is particularly interested in thinking about whether visual methods can help deliver new insights into these experiences and what forms these might take. The work is not making universal claims about maternal experience, but rather is interested in the vibrancy, intensity and freshness that visual methods can bring to elucidate human experience.
    • Peripheries and borders: Pushing the boundaries of visual research

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby,; Health & Social Care Research Centre (Taylor and Francis, 2013-07)
      In my last paper for Inscape, ‘Ways in Which Photographic and Other Images are Used in Research: An Introductory Overview’ (July, 2012), I summarised the ways in which the arts are being used by social scientists. In this paper I look at less mainstream developments which are nevertheless of interest. In particular, I outline Iain Edgar's idea of ‘imagework’, which is the use of creative visualisation within research processes (although much of what he does is rather akin to some forms of art therapy). Probably less well documented and explored is the interesting borderline between social science research and personal therapy represented by both social art therapy and phototherapy, both of which will be explored in further detail. This paper is then contextualised with reference to other recent papers discussing the potential contribution of art therapy to social science, psychological and ethnographic research projects.
    • Unpacking gender in art therapy: The elephant at the art therapy easel

      Hogan, Susan; Cornish, Shelagh; University of Derby,; Health & Social Care Research Centre (2014-10-28)
      A national survey of registered art therapists in Britain was undertaken to create both quantitative and qualitative data about how ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation influence the therapeutic relationship. A tick-box scale was used alongside more open questions. This article presents the initial findings of the research and will focus on gender issues in the art therapy relationship; it will elucidate some of the ways in which art therapists conceptualise gender in the therapeutic alliance. The research indicates that the overwhelming majority of art therapists think that their own gender is very important to the therapeutic encounter. The personal preference of the client, personal history and presenting issues, which may be gender related, are highlighted by both male and female respondents. Art therapists seek to be aware and non-judgemental regarding gender. An interesting finding highlights that the transference gender might not correspond to the biological sex, suggesting that some art therapists have a ‘mobile’ understanding of gender, and are keen not to foreclose conceptual possibilities because of gender. This would also seem to indicate a permeation of postmodernist ideas into art therapy thinking.
    • Your body is a battleground: Art therapy with women

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby,; Health & Social Care Research Centre (2013-09)
      This article interrogates the place of feminism within art therapy. It provides a lively, polemical argument that art therapy must maintain a critical relationship to the discipline of psychology in order to avoid oppressing women with misogynistic discourses which are embedded in theories and practices. The article also explores the visual culture which surrounds us, and how images affect our sensibility, our self-esteem, and our ability to act in the world.