• Delivering informed measures of patient centred care in medical imaging: What is the international perspective?

      Hyde, Emma; Hardy, Maryann; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-06-25)
      Focus on patient experience and patient centred approaches within healthcare has substantially increased since the Picker Institute (a not for profit organisation) was established in the 1980’s (Picker Institute, 2021). Picker’s founding principles have been adapted from their original form, to keep pace with changes in health and social care, but remain the cornerstone of research and guidance on person-centred approaches. Organisations such as the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute, have developed their own guiding principles for patient centred care, reflecting the nature of the health care systems in their respective countries. In the UK professional, statutory and regulatory bodies governing health care professionals, such as the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) and College of Radiographers, have also incorporated patient centred approaches and care into their Standards of Proficiency for registrants (HCPC, 2013; CoR, 2018). As guidance and regulation linked to patient care and patient experience has become more widespread, interest in research into patient centred care and approaches has developed. Publications sharing the findings of research projects carried out to investigate patient experience during medical imaging examinations and radiation therapy have also increased. In our research we have sought to define informed measures of patient centred care for medical imaging technologists, and to date have reported the findings from our UK based participant’s (Hyde & Hardy, 2020; Hyde & Hardy, 2021a; Hyde & Hardy, 2021b; Hyde & Hardy 2021c). In this commentary we would like to open up debate about the similarities and differences between UK and international views about patient centred care in medical imaging, and invite expressions of interest from potential collaborators.
    • Delivering patient centred care (Part 2): a qualitative study of the perceptions of service users and deliverers.

      Hyde, Emma; Hardy, Maryann; University of Derby; University of Bradford (Elsevier, 2020-10-07)
      There is growing awareness of the importance of patient centred care (PCC) in health care. Within Radiography in the UK, elements of PCC are embedded within professional body publications and guidance documents, but there is limited research evidence exploring whether perceptions of PCC are equivalent between those delivering (radiographers) and those experiencing (patient) care. This study aimed to address this gap by determining compatibility in perceptions of PCC between those using and those delivering radiography services in order to develop measurable indicators of PCC. This project was funded by the College of Radiographers Industry Partnership Scheme. Ethical approval was granted by the University of Derby College of Health & Social Care Ethics committee. This paper reports Stage 2 of the project, which was a series of focus groups and telephone interviews to enable deeper discussion and exploration of PCC. Situational vignettes were used to promote discussion and debate and encourage suggestions for PCC approaches. Audit tools to assess engagement with PCC were developed at individual and organisational level. Four focus groups and six telephone interviews were carried out in total. Focus groups were held in a variety of locations to promote attendance. Telephone interviews were used to capture participants who could not attend a focus group in person. Disparity between perceptions of service users and those delivering radiography services on what constitutes high quality PCC was evident. Perceived levels of care and the effectiveness of communication appeared to be the key influences on whether PCC was delivered. It is evident from the results of Stage 1 and Stage 2 that we have some way to go before we have parity in how care within diagnostic radiography is perceived, experienced and delivered. Audit tools and an educational toolkit are offered as ways to support increased PCC within diagnostic radiography practice. Several service improvements and audit tools are offered to support the increased delivery of PCC.
    • Patient centred care in diagnostic radiography (Part 1): Perceptions of service users and service deliverers

      Hyde, Emma; Hardy, Maryann; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-06-13)
      There is growing awareness of the importance of patient centered care (PCC) in health care. Within Radiography in the UK, elements of PCC are embedded within professional body publications and guidance documents. However, there is limited research evidence exploring whether perceptions of PCC are equivalent between those delivering (radiographers) and those experiencing (patient) care. This study aimed to address this gap by determining compatibility in perceptions of PCC between those using and those delivering radiography services. This is the first step in developing measurable indicators of PCC in diagnostic radiography. A multi-method two stage approach was undertaken using survey and interview data collection techniques. Ethical approval was granted by University of Derby College of Health & Social Care Ethics committee. This paper reports Stage 1 of the study, the online, cross sectional survey. Participants were asked to indicate their level of agreement to a series of attitudinal statements using a 5-point Likert scale. Statements were paired, but not co-located to increase validity. Participants were invited to provide free text comments to supplement their responses. Stage 2 of the project is reported separately. Survey responses were received from all 3 participant subgroups. A minimum response rate of 30 participants per sub-group was set as a target. Response rates varied across subgroups, with only radiography managers failing to meet the expected response threshold. Wide disparity between perceptions of service users and those delivering radiography services on what constitutes high quality PCC was evident. It is evident that there is still work required to ensure parity between expectations of service users and deliverers on what constitutes high quality PCC. Further work is required to identify measurable service delivery outcomes that represent PCC within radiographic practice.