• We are not the same people we used to be: an exploration of family biographical narratives and identity change following traumatic brain injury

      Whiffin, Charlotte Jane; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; Bailey, Christopher; Jarrett, Nicola; Hutchinson, Peter J.; University of Derby; Bournemouth University; University of Nottingham; University of Southampton; University of Cambridge (Taylor and Francis, 2017-10-26)
      Subjective changes are increasingly recognised as important in recovery and rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury. Accumulation of subjective changes over time has led many to examine the question of ‘continuity of self’ post-injury. Vacillation between feeling the same and different is common and often at odds with the medical narrative preparing families for permanent change. This position of ambiguity was examined in a qualitative narrative study. The aim of this paper is to describe the narrative structures used by uninjured members of a family to understand change. These changes relate primarily, to their perspective of whether and how the injured person had changed, but also secondarily to whether and why they themselves felt they had changed in the first year post-injury. Nine uninjured family members from three families took part in three unstructured interviews during the first twelve months post-injury. In-depth narrative analysis showed family members used biographical attendance; biographical disruption; biographical continuity and biographical reconstruction to understand change. Drawing on these findings it is argued that concentrating on a narrative of change is too limiting and that engaging in biographical narratives may help humanise care provided to injured individuals and their families. Implications for research and practice are discussed
    • We may unknowingly consume dangerous levels of alcohol.

      Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (EMAP publishing limited, 2018-05-31)
      Alcohol is the main cause of liver disease and associated death. By raising awareness and offering brief interventions, not only to patients but also to family and friends, nurses can potentially save lives.
    • Why it’s important healthcare professionals talk about dying

      Watson, Sharan; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-05-15)
      This week is Dying Matters Awareness Week (May 11-17) – an awareness week led by Hospice UK to provide an opportunity to discuss the importance of talking about dying, death and bereavement. Here, Sharan Watson, Programme Leader for PG Cert Palliative Care at the University of Derby, discusses why it is more imperative than ever that health and social care workers feel confident and supported to talk about bereavement. The theme of this year’s Dying Matters Awareness Week is ‘Dying to be heard’, which feels so much more pertinent in our current challenges of delivering person-centred care during the Coronavirus pandemic. This week marked International Nurses Day (May 12) and 200 years since Florence Nightingale was born. Being a nurse has given so many of us the platform to develop such a diversity across all settings and has highlighted the true importance of interprofessional working.
    • Will graduate entry free nursing from the shackles of class and gender oppression?

      Whitehead, Bill; University of Derby (Macmillan Publishing Ltd., 2010-06)
      Debates in nursing focus on the provision of good nursing care and its relation to academic status. For example, are nurses "too posh to wash" if they believe entry to the profession should require a degree, or is this a case of them having pretensions "above their station"? This article discusses the nature of oppression and its relationship to hierarchy, and concludes that nurses are oppressed through gender and socioeconomic class. It also examines the profession's social position, arguing thatthe majority of nurses identify with the most oppressed social class.