• The diagnosis and management of a patient with acute pyelonephritis

      Hudson, Carly; Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2020-02-13)
      Lower urinary tract infections account for more than 224 000 hospital admissions each year and nearly all of these have the pathophysiological possibility to develop into pyelonephritis, known clinically as an upper urinary tract infection. Acute pyelonephritis is characterised by inflammation of the renal parenchyma caused by bacteriuria ascending from the bladder, up the ureters to the kidneys. Effective history taking, combined with refined physical examination skills, are the two most powerful tools to differentiate upper and lower urinary tract infections as well as assisting the practitioner to exclude other differential diagnoses. Utilisation of these skills by the practitioner, together with the recognised presenting symptom triad of flank pain, fever and nausea in this case study, enabled the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis to be given.
    • Primary biliary cholangitis: symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

      Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (MA Healthcare, 2019-06)
      Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), previously known as primary biliary cirrhosis, is a chronic but progressive disease that, over many years, causes damage to bile ducts, leading to cholestasis and, in some patients, cirrhosis. The rate at which PBC progresses varies from person to person, but significant damage takes decades to occur. It predominately affects women aged 40–60 years with a female to male ratio of 9:1, but can affect anyone from the age of 20. There is no cure for PBC other than liver transplant, but medications can be given to slow down disease progression and for the treatment of symptoms. Health professionals should monitor for complications, including the development of osteoporosis, vitamin deficiencies and liver cirrhosis, which caries the associated complications of portal hypertension, varices and ascites.