• Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis: a guide and case study

      Boyer, Helena; Mortimore, Gerri; Royal Derby Hospital; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2020-12-10)
      Vasculitis is a relatively rare and poorly understood condition causing inflammation of the blood vessels, which in turn can affect a patient's respiratory and renal systems. In some cases, ocular involvement can cause loss of sight and hearing loss may also be a red flag for vasculitis, which, if not treated early, can cause complete hearing loss. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group comprising granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and eosinophilic granulomatosis (EGP). AAV is fatal if untreated and as increased risk escalates with age, coupled with a decline in renal function, these are the principal predictors of poor outcome. Vital roles for nursing vasculitis patients lie in managing inflammation and pain, as these distressing symptoms are prevalent in the disease. Because of the multiple complications that can occur with vasculitis, treatment-related information is a high priority for these patients. As nurses are well placed to deliver information, value lies in their role in reducing the negative impacts on treatment regimens and compliance that accompany patients' poor insight into their condition.
    • Chronic limb ischaemia: case study and clinical literature review

      Farrington, Liz; Mortimore, Gerri; University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2021-07-21)
      This article will discuss chronic limb ischaemia as the result of peripheral artery disease (PAD) using a case study. The patient's concurrent diagnosis of metastases meant clinical decision making was complex and treatment options were limited. PAD is the third most common clinical presentation of atherosclerosis after coronary artery disease and stroke. Although advances in radiological technology and biochemical screening offer the potential for earlier intervention and improved survival rates for patients with PAD, a review of the evidence suggests that commitment to more conservative approaches, such as exercise therapy and health promotion, could have more sustainable, longer-term benefits for patients with chronic limb ischaemia. The therapeutic nature of the nurse–patient relationship makes nurses ideally placed for encouraging lifestyle changes and signposting to support services. Active participation from the patient is imperative for any potential modifications, which should be individualised as part of a holistic care plan, to ensure patient engagement and compliance. Therefore emphasis should remain on the management and prevention of modifiable risk factors, for which the nurse's role is an integral part to ensure success.
    • The diagnosis and management of a patient with acute pyelonephritis

      Hudson, Carly; Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (Mark Allen Group, 2020-02-13)
      Lower urinary tract infections account for more than 224 000 hospital admissions each year and nearly all of these have the pathophysiological possibility to develop into pyelonephritis, known clinically as an upper urinary tract infection. Acute pyelonephritis is characterised by inflammation of the renal parenchyma caused by bacteriuria ascending from the bladder, up the ureters to the kidneys. Effective history taking, combined with refined physical examination skills, are the two most powerful tools to differentiate upper and lower urinary tract infections as well as assisting the practitioner to exclude other differential diagnoses. Utilisation of these skills by the practitioner, together with the recognised presenting symptom triad of flank pain, fever and nausea in this case study, enabled the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis to be given.