• An initiative for student nurses to practise clinical skills at home

      Whitehead, Bill; Ansell, Helen; University of Derby (EMAP, 2021-02-15)
      This article describes an initiative for students to practise clinical skills in their own homes using university-supplied instructions and equipment, implemented as a response to the restrictions to on-campus teaching during the coronavirus pandemic. It includes recommendations for future use, concluding that it would also be a useful adjunct to traditional training methods following the end of the pandemic.
    • A literature review exploring the preparation of mental health nurses for working with people with learning disability and mental illness.

      Adshead, Stephanie; Collier, Elizabeth; Kennedy, Sarah; University of Salford (Elsevier, 2015-01-23)
      The aim of this literature review is to explore whether mental health nurses are being appropriately prepared to care for learning disabled patients who also suffer from mental ill health. A systematic approach was adopted in order to identify relevant literature for review on the topic. Five electronic databases were searched; CINAHL, Medline, ERIC, PubMed and Scopus. Searches were limited to the years 2001-2013. A total of 13 articles were identified as relevant to the topic area for review. Three main themes were identified relating to (a) attitudes (b) practice and (c) education. There appears to be a lack of research that directly addresses this issue and the existing literature suggests that there are considerable deficits in the ability of mental health nurses to be able to provide appropriate care for those with both a learning disability and mental ill health. The findings of this review would suggest that this topic area is in urgent need of further investigation and research. Further research into this area of practice could possibly help to inform education regarding this subject at pre-registration and post qualifying levels, which could therefore in turn, improve the delivery of mental health nursing care to this particular client group.
    • "Penny's plan" - Dying matters what can we do?

      Watson, Sharan; O'Reilly, Chris; Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-05-14)
    • Using more healthcare areas for placements

      Sherratt, Lou; Young, Alwyn; Brundrett, Heather; Whitehead, Bill; Collins, Guy; University of Derby (Macmillan Publishing Ltd., 2013-06-26)
      The need for private, voluntary and independent placements in nursing programmes has become more important in recent years due to changes in where health services are delivered. These placements can be used effectively within nursing programmes to show students the realities of healthcare, and to challenge myths and attitudes. Dedicated time and resources need to be provided to discover and maintain these placements, and to ensure appropriate, high-quality learning opportunities. This article presents the findings of a national Higher Education Academy workshop, held at the University of Derby in November 2012. It explores three key issues discussed at the workshop: current practice and opportunities for learning; myths, attitudes and solutions; and maintaining the quality of placements. The use of PVI placements is seen as valuable and a set of recommendations are provided to assist in their use.
    • Will graduate entry free nursing from the shackles of class and gender oppression?

      Whitehead, Bill; University of Derby (Macmillan Publishing Ltd., 2010-06)
      Debates in nursing focus on the provision of good nursing care and its relation to academic status. For example, are nurses "too posh to wash" if they believe entry to the profession should require a degree, or is this a case of them having pretensions "above their station"? This article discusses the nature of oppression and its relationship to hierarchy, and concludes that nurses are oppressed through gender and socioeconomic class. It also examines the profession's social position, arguing thatthe majority of nurses identify with the most oppressed social class.